Schwarzenegger Says Nurses are "Set Dressing" - page 7

And the hits just keep on coming ... :uhoh21: According to the Sacramento Bee, Gov. Schwarzenegger had this to say about protesting nurses in California: "They are becoming now more and more... Read More

  1. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from stevielynn
    And I LOVE JAMIE LEE CURTIS. :hatparty:
    I want to steal her Nurse Barbie!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from caroladybelle
    I want to steal her Nurse Barbie!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I know, wouldn't that be cool!!!

    I think the photo is funny. In a nice way. I'm sure these two people were trying to raise money and were good sports and dressed up like a stereotypical nurse and doc.

    steph
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Mar 2, '05
  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I own that Dr. Ken.

    His coat was a lab coat by day, but flip the upper corners outward, an instant tuxedo for the evening.

    (Kinda reminds me of politicians. With the flip of the hands, you can be a different person)
  4. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    His coat was a lab coat by day, but flip the upper corners outward, an instant tuxedo for the evening.

    (Kinda reminds me of politicians. With the flip of the hands, you can be a different person)

    I wanna know--did he come with a set of golf clubs, a Jag, and a Diner's Club Card?:chuckle
  5. by   dazzle256
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I remember when the Teamsters went on strike years ago. Nothing in the US that moved by truck moved at all. So we had no bread, no milk, no eggs, etc. Stuff rotted at the docks, and the country was virtually shut down. That "got ugly."

    Yet we rooted for the truckers and waited it out.

    Anyone remember the Air Controllers strike? That most certainly "got ugly." So ugly that President Reagan stepped in.

    Those workers struck for better pay and working conditions. Yet they struck for their own interests. Nurses, on the other hand, typically strike for better conditions for their patients.

    Yet culturally, if nurses strike for better pay and benefits for themselves as well as their patients, "it makes them look bad."

    People don't realize their bias, their stereotyping of nurses (and women). I'd even go so far as to suggest that this bias is tacitly supported by the ANA, despite their strongly worded Code of Ethics.

    The ANA Code of Ethics includes two statements that basically say that nurses are morally obligated to leave any facility that is dangerous, and supports the notions of "workplace advocacy" and "collective bargaining."

    Because of copyright laws, I can only post the link and ask you to read Section 6.3:
    http://nursingworld.org/ethics/code/...ode150.htm#6.3

    I say "notion" because we all are very much aware that the collective bargaining process can be a painful one. I get the impression that the ANA means this process needs to be as pain-free as possible because I don't actually see the ANA doing anything. This is akin to a nurse standing at the bedside of an arresting patient reading the ACLS guidelines but not administering any medication or treatment.

    The ANA says all the right words, but they provide none of the political clout that it takes to get the job done. Nurses have been strongarmed politically into silence for decades, yet the ANA only spends its funds on publishing Position Papers that no one ever reads or cares about because there is no follow-through.

    CNA accomplished staffing ratios by "getting ugly." Where's the ANA now? Are they willing to get their hands dirty for their patients, for the nurses who look to them for leadership? Oh no, not if it involves "getting ugly." According to the ANA, we nurses may always--actually we "must"--vote with our feet on behalf of our patients, we must take the hits individually, but never take an active stance collectively. Too messy.

    The CNA's victory is representative of a "silent majority" of nurses:

    To all the nurses who went on strike--and lost. To all the nurses who lost jobs trying to advocate for union representation because management let their patients die. To all the nurses who were unfairly fired or threatened with loss of license because they were "troublemakers." To all those who refused that extra patient or who spoke up about unsafe delivery of care. To all the nurses who hurt their backs, got sick or died from needlesticks, who couldn't take the stress and had to leave the profession altogether....

    the CNAs staffing ratio victory is representative of all the nurses who've been beaten into submission by the wealthy, by the powerful--special interests.

    The CNA represents all of those nurses who protested individually and were silenced by professional etiquette and political strongarm tactics. If they are now characterized as a "special interest," on one hand, it means they have acquired political power. If they are noticeable enough to be "set dressing," then they are acknowledged, however unconsciously, to be the reality behind the bad acting of the politicos.

    You go, girls. You just get as ugly as you want. The situation's called for it for decades. We're with you all the way.
    Excellent post...thanks
  6. by   begalli
    Does anyone really think that if Arnold or even Maria needed nursing care in a hospital that they wouldn't have a nurse at their beck and call 24 hours/day during their stay?

    VIP type nursing care is available at many hospitals in So CA, I'm positively sure that these hospitals/units staff specifically for VIP's. The VIP's pay for it.

    What has to happen is a not so well known family member or friend of these "celebrities" needs to fall ill and experience the reality of RN staffing problems and then relay their story to those who never experience the real world while they get their VIP treatment. Whatever.

    About the coach analogy. I've been involved heavily with youth sports for more than 10 years both as the parent of a player and as an insider of a very large league. What is described happens with boys too. It has to do with youth sports, not necessarily whether the youth are boys or girls.

    What you described stevielynn happened with an excellent soccer coach my son had. Some parents didn't like his style of "teaching" which I and some other parents absolutely, positively agreed with and supported 100%. These are serious teen soccer players hoping to play college soccer and this was a serious coach who was an ex-professional player. Some parents felt that this excellent coach was too rough on their kids (making them accountable for their actions/inactions like nutrition, working on their game outside of practices, showing up and putting 110% into practice, taking it seriously, etc). EXACTLY the kid of discipline and guidance teens this age need. He was replaced by a kinder, gentler coach after the parents quibbling and complaining. This split a great team in half and many talented players left after the coaching change.

    I guess my point is that when it has to do with kids, doesn't matter if it's boys or girls, parents are very sensitive and controlling about how they perceive coaches should "treat" their kids and I think it's based on their own beliefs about how discipline (teaching) should be done. When in fact it's not up to the parents. The coach is the coach and the boss of his/her team and it should be played by coaches rules, not the parents rules - for boys and girls.
  7. by   jnette
    Quote from dazzle256
    Excellent post...thanks

    DITTO !!!
  8. by   begalli
    I'm just really wondering what Arnold's response would be if a couple dozen nurses who where men showed up at one of his events. I would really be curious as to his response to them.

    I'd love for the protestors to arrange for something like this as an experiment.
  9. by   CseMgr1
    Arnie's still an actor...and he's no different than the rest of the fakes and phonies who run this country.
  10. by   jnette
    Quote from begalli
    I'm just really wondering what Arnold's response would be if a couple dozen nurses who where men showed up at one of his events. I would really be curious as to his response to them.

    I'd love for the protestors to arrange for something like this as an experiment.
    I hate to say this, as it may be totally and shamefully presumptive on my part, but the vibes I get from him lead me to believe he would have little regard or respect for men in nursing.. that he would regard them as "girlymen". JMO. :stone
  11. by   prmenrs
    Did anyone else see the article in this week's Time magazine re: Arnold and CNA?
  12. by   jaimealmostRN
    Quote from RN4NICU
    Whatever

    Nurses are not asking for special treatment because they are women. But they ARE asking not to be disrespected JUST because they are women. The point was made that "male" service professionals, such as police and firefighters are NOT disrespected the way nursing is. Asking for the same respect is not asking for "special treatment" it is asking for equal treatment.
    THIS is exactly what I was trying to say! Other "life-saving professions" (police, fire) ALWAYS stick together. When one is down, they ALL rally behind, usually, him. In Nursing, there's alway someone who "doesn't want to get involved" whether it be someone who witnesses a crime (KY surgeon vs. nurse) or someone who just wants to play devil's advocate. I'm not one to follow the pack either, but to truly advance Nursing, we MUST stick together.
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I say "notion" because we all are very much aware that the collective bargaining process can be a painful one. I get the impression that the ANA means this process needs to be as pain-free as possible because I don't actually see the ANA doing anything. This is akin to a nurse standing at the bedside of an arresting patient reading the ACLS guidelines but not administering any medication or treatment.

    The ANA says all the right words, but they provide none of the political clout that it takes to get the job done. Nurses have been strongarmed politically into silence for decades, yet the ANA only spends its funds on publishing Position Papers that no one ever reads or cares about because there is no follow-through.

    CNA accomplished staffing ratios by "getting ugly." Where's the ANA now? Are they willing to get their hands dirty for their patients, for the nurses who look to them for leadership? Oh no, not if it involves "getting ugly." According to the ANA, we nurses may always--actually we "must"--vote with our feet on behalf of our patients, we must take the hits individually, but never take an active stance collectively. Too messy.
    Great post.

    I don't know if anyone has seen the HBO movie Iron Jawed Angels, but it's about the women's sufferage movement.

    The movie is about two defiant women, Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, who broke from the mainstream women's-rights movement and created a more radical wing, pushing the boundaries of political protest to secure women's voting rights in 1920. The women were thrown in jail and went on a hunger strike that made national news.

    It was only after the more "radical wing" broke off from the mainstream organization that women actually secured the right to vote.

    I see a lot of parallels between this and CNA breaking off from ANA. The more "radical" CNA gets results. ANA accomplishes nothing, as evidenced by their loss on the overtime issue last year.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 2, '05

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