Schwarzenegger Says Nurses are "Set Dressing" - page 2

And the hits just keep on coming ... :uhoh21: According to the Sacramento Bee, Gov. Schwarzenegger had this to say about protesting nurses in California: "They are becoming now more and more... Read More

  1. by   unknown99
    I guess he does not realize that he may need a nurse someday!!!!
  2. by   jaimealmostRN
    I saw a picture of him in a speedo (((shudder))) and instead of the muscles he use to have, he was flabby and out of shape. Looks like CAD, and DM may be in his future. He'll probably need a Nurse much sooner than he thought.
  3. by   oramar
    Can't help but wondering ANA will sit on there hands and lets there remarks stand. I have not renewed my membership and if they do nothing and say nothing the ANA and I are finished. The problem is that CNA is a splinter group of ANA and I am afraid the ANA will see this as CNA problem. It is not, this man has insulted every nurse in the USA in particular and every nurse in the world in general. I am also going to write to PSNA and demand that they do something. I was going to at least join the PSNA if I did not renew my ANA membership. However, I am going to wait and see how both of these orginazation react before I write any checks. My advice to both PSNA and ANA is that your credibility is on the line. You better take a stand here and redeem youself and make up for all the times you have been wishy washy.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    The more he talks the more he shows his ignorance. He needs impeached.

    I will give him credit on this though. It must take a LOT of energy to be that **** stupid.
  5. by   markbeast
    Am I the only one who thinks the way CNA is conducted itself is making nurses out to look like a group of wanna-be professionals? Storming Press conferences? Attacking public figures at random events? Spending a fortune on smear advertising.

    This whole thing is leaving a bad taste in my mouth. Isn't there a better way to get the point across than to act like hooligans? Where is the negotiation? Where is the discussion. We have completely severed ties with the leader of our state.

    CNA you do not have my support to conduct yourself the way you have been acting, and I know I am not alone. Your issue is right, your tactics are wrong. Stop using intimidation tactics. They are not working and they are losing us respect.
    Last edit by markbeast on Feb 27, '05
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from markbeast
    Am I the only one who thinks the way CNA is conducted itself is making nurses out to look like a group of wanna-be professionals? Storming Press conferences? Attacking public figures at random events? Spending a fortune on smear advertising.

    This whole thing is leaving a bad taste in my mouth. Isn't there a better way to get the point across than to act like hooligans? Where is the negotiation? Where is the discussion. We have completely severed ties with the leader of our state.

    CNA you do not have my support to conduct yourself the way you have been acting, and I know I am not alone. Your issue is right, your tactics are wrong. Stop using intimidation tactics. They are not working and they are losing us respect.
    I disagree. The "leader" of your state is not only trying to roll back the ratio law but he also vetoed the lift team bill, which would have required all hospitals to employ lift teams so RNs wouldn't injure their backs. I don't know about you, but every nurse I know has back problems.

    Your "leader" has also cut nursing school funding which, of course, contributes to the same shortage he's using to justify all of his anti-nurse initiatives, which will only worsen the shortage further.

    The fact of the matter is: Schwarzenegger has been very bad for nurses.

    If you think being polite and quiet accomplishes anything ... just look at what's happened in other states with the ratio issue .... NOTHING. Every other ratio bill in the country has failed. Sometimes you need an aggressive organization to get anything done.

    I think CNA HAD to make a big stink about this because, if they hadn't, Schwarzenegger probably would have tried to repeal the ratio law all together. Now, with all of the publicity they've gotten, he'll really have to think twice about going any further.

    Besides ... since when is protesting the same thing as acting like a bunch of hooligans? It's not like they've physically assaulted anyone.

    At the local hospital in my area, CNA always tries to negotiate first. Guess what? The hospital doesn't listen ... they just stall and stall. It's only when they protest and generate a lot of publicity that the hospital realizes CNA means business and finally gives the nurses basic raises and pension benefits.

    That's what it takes to get anything done, and CNA has significantly improved working conditions for RNs in my area. After CNA organized one hospital, wages and benefits increased at all of the hospitals because they were so afraid of CNA coming into their facilities.

    CNA should be applauded for what they've done. As far as I'm concerned, they should keep doing what they're doing because it's the only thing that works.

    Being polite and ladylike doesn't get the job done. You have to make a lot of noise.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Feb 28, '05
  7. by   NGACRNA
    [Schwarzenegger himself is dismissive of the protesters who are becoming a regular part of his political road show.

    "They are becoming now more and more part of the set dressing," he said in an interview this week. "It's kind of like the extras when you do a movie and you need extras in the background. That's what they've become. That's fine with me."]

    Hmmm, sounds like he's referring to those nurses from the CNA that continue to "storm" his speaking engagements, NOT all nurses. He is "dismissive of the protesters", NOT all nurses.

    We, as nurses, need to consider what is good for the whole country, not just our little piece of it. If you want socialized medicine, please leave this country (and take Alec Baldwin and Cher and Babs with you).

    I am now ready to receive a mountain of criticism because I'm:
    1. Not in California
    2. A CRNA

    But let's keep it civilized, shall we?
    Last edit by NGACRNA on Feb 28, '05 : Reason: typo
  8. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    He isn't a smart man...who is "set dressing his speeches".

    Sarah
  9. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from NGACRNA
    [Schwarzenegger himself is dismissive of the protesters who are becoming a regular part of his political road show.

    "They are becoming now more and more part of the set dressing," he said in an interview this week. "It's kind of like the extras when you do a movie and you need extras in the background. That's what they've become. That's fine with me."]

    Hmmm, sounds like he's referring to those nurses from the CNA that continue to "storm" his speaking engagements, NOT all nurses. He is "dismissive of the protesters", NOT all nurses.

    We, as nurses, need to consider what is good for the whole country, not just our little piece of it. If you want socialized medicine, please leave this country (and take Alec Baldwin and Cher and Babs with you).

    I am now ready to receive a mountain of criticism because I'm:
    1. Not in California
    2. A CRNA

    But let's keep it civilized, shall we?
    I have to say that your first paragraph is how I read the article and I was surprised at the mischaracterization. He was referring to the group of protesters. Not all of nursing.

    And if "Being polite and ladylike doesn't get the job done. You have to make a lot of noise" is what the protesters believe than they have to be big enough to take the guff they will get for it. One thing that has always bugged me is when women want a place at the table and then dish it out but complain when they get the same treatment back. If you want equality, it has to go both ways. Stand toe to toe with someone you disagree with and you are going to get coming back at you what you are sending.

    And you shouldn't complain about it. Respond to it with facts, information, etc. Don't all of a sudden start complaining that the big guy is treating the little woman badly - like women are weak or something :angryfire . That isn't feminism or equality. And that bugs me.

    steph
  10. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from jnette
    Such arrogance......... :stone
    I agree and its such a shame. Even if one disagrees, there is no need to demean the other and their POV.

    Cali nurses...you GO! America's nurses are watching and most admire you and appreciate your hard work!
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I guess what bugs me most is how rude and unprofessionally he handles his disagreement with nurses. He is held to a standard as GOVERNOR that he is FAILING to meet. NO CLASS. I am NOT impressed.
  12. by   Spidey's mom
    <<"I guess what bugs me most is how rude and unprofessionally he handles his disagreement with nurses. He is held to a standard as GOVERNOR that he is FAILING to meet. NO CLASS. I am NOT impressed.">>

    Deb - as opposed to how the nurses who are protesting against him act?
    "They came into our office building, stormed the elevators, jammed our lobby and stood on our furniture," Emerson said. "They yelled all kinds of very angry charges, including, 'CHA kills people.' They marched around our reception desk for about 15 minutes."

    All I'm saying is that if you want to make changes and you have to do aggressive things to get noticed, you shouldn't be surprised that people respond. I think the complaining about Arnold's comments makes women look like crybabies and it really bothers me.

    And Arnold did actually say a couple of good things about nurses in general at the end of the article. When he was making the comment that the activist nurses are like set dressing or extras in a movie he was talking about the activisits being in the background wherever he goes . .. . he wasn't speaking of nurses at the bedside.

    And that is different than this thread started out purporting him to have said.

    "Schwarzenegger himself is dismissive of the protesters who are becoming a regular part of his political road show."

    "They are becoming now more and more part of the set dressing," he said in an interview this week. "It's kind of like the extras when you do a movie and you need extras in the background. That's what they've become. That's fine with me." (And that is fine with him)




    Quote from lizz
    And the hits just keep on coming ... :uhoh21:

    According to the Sacramento Bee, Gov. Schwarzenegger had this to say about protesting nurses in California:

    "They are becoming now more and more part of the set dressing," he said in an interview this week. "It's kind of like the extras when you do a movie and you need extras in the background. That's what they've become. That's fine with me."

    http://www.sacbee.com/content/politi...13318409c.html

    Here's the entire article:

    Members of the California Nurses Association stood up as Schwarzenegger was speaking at the Sheraton Grand on Thursday and unfurled a banner reading, "Stop the Power Grab."

    A week earlier, they protested as the Republican governor and a group of Hollywood stars arrived for a Sacramento movie premiere. The California Highway Patrol pulled one nurse out of the theater audience for questioning after spotting her hospital uniform.

    The CNA plans to fly an anti-Schwar-zenegger banner over the Oscar ceremonies in Hollywood on Sunday night.

    Officials of the state's largest nurses union say their concern is patient safety: They want the governor to stop blocking new regulations that would boost the number of nurses hospitals are required to have on duty.

    Largely due to the sponsorship of the CNA, California last year became the first state in the nation to institute mandatory nurse-patient ratios for hospitals. Until Schwarzenegger stepped in, the allowable ratio of patients to nurses was scheduled to decrease in January. The plan would have increased the mandatory number of nurses since each nurse would be handling fewer patients.

    But critics of the registered nurses union - namely, hospitals - say the group's aggressive tactics are more suited to the Teamsters than to caregivers. And they charge that the CNA is using the publicity as part of a national organizing drive.

    "What's important is that people understand their agenda," said Jan Emerson, a spokeswoman for the California Hospital Association. "Their vitriolic campaigning citing what are honestly minor changes to the ratios is not about their so-called concern about patients. It is about their efforts to make themselves a national labor union."

    Schwarzenegger himself is dismissive of the protesters who are becoming a regular part of his political road show.

    "They are becoming now more and more part of the set dressing," he said in an interview this week. "It's kind of like the extras when you do a movie and you need extras in the background. That's what they've become. That's fine with me."

    Officials at the CNA see the complaints about their tactics as pure sexism.

    "If you know anything about nurses at the bedside, they are extremely vocal in making sure they get the staffing they need," said Deborah Burger, a nurse who is president of the CNA. "They have to go up against sometimes very hostile hospital administrators and doctors. It only seems hostile or assertive because I think there's a bit of a gender bias. ... It's really trying to say women are not acting as they are supposed to."

    She added: "We couldn't be doing this aggressive campaign if we didn't have 100 percent support from our nurses."

    The CNA has 60,000 members and represents registered nurses at 171 health facilities throughout the state. Bay Area nurses founded the organization as a professional association affiliated with the national American Nurses Association about 100 years ago. It became a union in the 1940s.

    The group also lobbies on health care issues and donates to political campaigns. Officially nonpartisan, the CNA tends to give to Democrats who support its views. The group opposed the recall election and declined to endorse a candidate in the race for a new governor.

    Ten years ago, the CNA broke away from the more conservative American Nurses Association at a time when the advent of managed care in California stirred political activism among nurses. The CNA's membership has almost tripled since then, its leaders say.

    According to the Center for California Health Workforce Studies at the University of California, San Francisco, about one in five nurses nationwide is a member of a union, but the rate in California is double that.

    The CNA gained national fame among nurses in 1999 when Gov. Gray Davis signed the nation's first law mandating staffing ratios at hospitals.

    Partly because of the ratio law, Modern Healthcare magazine last year named CNA Director Rose Ann DeMoro the 35th most powerful person in health care in the nation, above such people as the dean of the Yale medical school and executives at Kaiser Permanente.

    The group has been organizing nationally, sparking sometimes bitter fights in California, Hawaii and Illinois as they attempt to persuade nurses that the CNA can help them more than other unions.

    "The California Nurses Association has been nationally recognized as one of the most aggressive nursing unions in the United States," said Joanne Spetz, associate director of the Center for California Health Workforce Studies. "That's been controversial within the profession. There are a lot of nurses who think collective bargaining is contrary to the notion of being a profession."

    Emerson of the California Hospital Association, for one, is not a fan of the CNA's tactics. She recalls a 2001 protest that the CNA held at the hospital group's Sacramento offices.

    "They came into our office building, stormed the elevators, jammed our lobby and stood on our furniture," Emerson said. "They yelled all kinds of very angry charges, including, 'CHA kills people.' They marched around our reception desk for about 15 minutes. They broke through some locked doors and harassed support staff and then demanded to use our bathrooms. They told one of our lobbyists if they didn't let them use our bathrooms, they would urinate on our carpets."

    CNA officials describe the protest differently. They said it was fully within the bounds of acceptable conduct. The suggestion that they threatened to defile the CHA's carpets is "a baldfaced lie," said the CNA's DeMoro, a professional labor organizer whom the nurses hired away from a job organizing film industry producers for the Teamsters union 20 years ago.

    "What Schwarzenegger has done is made this a very partisan fight because now he's getting the Republicans to attack us," DeMoro said. "The reality is nurses are not partisan."

    Schwarzenegger amped up the nurses' ire at a Long Beach speech in December when he responded to their noisy protest by saying, "Pay no attention to those voices over there. They are the special interests, and you know what I mean. The special interests don't like me in Sacramento because I am always kicking their butts."

    More recently, the CNA says the Schwarzenegger administration has overreacted to some of its protests, citing the incident when a nurse, Kelly DiGiacomo, was questioned and detained during the movie premiere.

    Kelly Huston, a spokesman for the California Highway Patrol, said that the officers were performing routine security matters.

    The governor says he has nothing against nurses.

    "They have taken care of me really well each time I was in the hospital, if it was in the heart surgery or the hip surgery or whatever it was," he said.

    He added: "Each of those nurses that are protesting are at the same time saving lives. And they are just being dragged in by the union. Eventually, they will get it that the unions are taking (money) from their paychecks and they have no control over it."

    He doesn't plan to change his mind.

    The nurses "can do whatever they need to do," he said. "I do what I need to do, and that's how we're going to go down the line."

    The nurses don't plan to change, either.

    "We don't have a choice but to fight the fight," DeMoro said. "If we don't fight, who will help the public?"
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Feb 28, '05
  13. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Hmmm, sounds like he's referring to those nurses from the CNA that continue to "storm" his speaking engagements, NOT all nurses. He is "dismissive of the protesters", NOT all nurses.
    Review ALL of his comments about nurses, and not just this one. Then it sounds like he's refering to all.

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