Schwarzenegger Says Nurses are "Set Dressing" - page 17

And the hits just keep on coming ... :uhoh21: According to the Sacramento Bee, Gov. Schwarzenegger had this to say about protesting nurses in California: "They are becoming now more and more... Read More

  1. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from lizz
    If nurses don't want to join a union, that's fine with me. My only problem is when they complain about what the union is doing, claiming they're tarnishing the nursing profession, that they're a bunch of thugs, etc. ...

    While, simultaneously, they benefit so much from the ratio law and don't even have to pay for the effort. To me, that's what's really selfish.

    I realize that you haven't made those comments Steph, but a lot of nurses on this board have. That's what drive me nuts.

    As far as people refusing to work with heavy patient loads ... that's great. But not everybody can afford to do that. They have bills to pay. The RN's who could afford to quit did, but there many RN's who don't have that choice ... simply from a financial standpoint.

    Would you say the same thing if your employer was asking you to do something unethical? Would you still work?

    I think there are ways to stand up for your patients and your own ethical considerations.

    However I'm speaking as a 47 year old . . .

    I wonder if people don't realize the power they actually have? Until they live a little.
  2. by   MissPiggy
    Quote from lizz
    This is what really drives me crazy about RNs who criticize CNA, just because they don't like the union's image and some of the things they do. They don't even pay union dues, and still benefit from ratios .... yet they complain.

    If CNA wasn't around, and if there wasn't a ratio law, then they'd be complaining about having to juggle up to 12 patients at one time.

    You have to wonder what these people are thinking. Would they prefer no CNA and no ratio law and much heavier patient loads? Just so their polite "image" of nursing could remain intact?

    I've said it before but it's worth repeating: 60,000 RN's pay union dues so more than 300,000 California RNs could benefit from ratios. That means only 20 percent of the RNs in this state are actually footing the bill for this effort while the remaining 80 percent benefit yet, they complain, don't have to pay anything for the benefits they're receiving.

    Yet ... some of them have the gall to complain and complain.

    It's truly outrageous.


    :angryfire
    Well said, lizz... that is as bad as these nurses in Texas - they complain and complain but are so anti-union it is sickening; sometimes I think they deserve whatever they get.
  3. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from MissPiggy
    Well said, lizz... that is as bad as these nurses in Texas - they complain and complain but are so anti-union it is sickening; sometimes I think they deserve whatever they get.

    Anyone in any job who complains but isn't part of the process to fix the problem has no credibility. And those kind of people are everywhere.

    Heck, even my kids will try to whine about something but won't take a minute to figure out the solution.

    That is not exclusive to union/anti-union folks. :wink2:

    steph
  4. by   MissPiggy
    Quote from stevielynn
    Anyone in any job who complains but isn't part of the process to fix the problem has no credibility. And those kind of people are everywhere.

    Heck, even my kids will try to whine about something but won't take a minute to figure out the solution.

    That is not exclusive to union/anti-union folks. :wink2:

    steph
    True, but extremely frustrating to those who see the bigger picture but get no support and actually risk their jobs by saying anything. That is one of the reasons I am getting out of nursing.
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from MissPiggy
    Well said, lizz... that is as bad as these nurses in Texas - they complain and complain but are so anti-union it is sickening; sometimes I think they deserve whatever they get.
    Texas scares me. There does seem to be a lot of unhappy Texas nurses on this board. Glad I don't live there anymore ...

  6. by   MissPiggy
    Quote from lizz
    Texas scares me. There does seem to be a lot of unhappy Texas nurses on this board. Glad I don't live there anymore ...

    Don't blame you... one of my fondest wishes was to start a nurses' union here before I got out, but I guess they'd rather stew in their own juices, so let them have their fun.
    Sorry if I sound bitter, but I have been a nurse here for the last 20 years and have seen enough! Am hoping to get out in Dec. when I am due to graduate with a Masters' in Clinical Psych and find a full-time internship in counseling. I now see why nurses are treated like you-know-what here - they are willing to take it! Well I'm not, so there!!!
    Sorry for the soapboxing, but this is a VERY sensitive issue with me; thanks for listening, now I'll shut up!!! :spin:
  7. by   PMHNP10
    Quote from stevielynn
    I think there are ways to stand up for your patients and your own ethical considerations.

    However I'm speaking as a 47 year old . . .

    I wonder if people don't realize the power they actually have? Until they live a little.
    I have to say your post got me thinking; and forgive me for any incoherence, but I'm kindly thinking out loud. I think that it's a fair statement that I speak up when I need to--I don't have much problem voicing my opinion. Regardless, I am really having difficult time thinking of any ideas in which I could possibly bring about change in a hospital setting.

    If I were asked to help a person die, for example, I would simply refuse because by doing so I'd lose my license. If I get fired for doing such I'd file for wrongful termination. On the other hand, if I'm asked to care for 9, 10, 11+ acutely ill patients and I refuse to do so, I would get fired and would likely have actions taken against my license, which I'd probably have no defense against outside of CA. This is just a couple ways of fighting the system, but in the end, what have I accomplished other than losing my job?

    I could write editorials, educate the public, send out fliers, write congress, etc., but I am but one person. What am I likely to accomplish, no matter how eloquently my editorial articles or letters are written? Let's pretend that I'm trying to present my case to a Tenet owned hospital or Arnold (whether he's the head of the hospital, or govt official). There are plenty of ego driven people running hospitals, politicians, etc. Am I going to be able to convince them to sit down with me, Mr. Joe Public, and reasonably discuss my concerns, allowing me to present them with facts and figures? I guess there is a first for everything, but I wouldn't hold my breath for it to occur. So what can any individual accomplish that would set forth change in nursing care? BTW I'm not rich, so outbribing the lobbyists, hospital CEOs, etc isn't going to happen for sure; and as the old saying goes, money talks, BS walks.

    So let's say I pass the word and other nurses start to back me. Is there going to be any difference when it's 10, 20, 30, thousands of voices instead of 1? I guess it's possible, but we have to get real results, not just open some eyes. Still the bottom line is the money; often facts have nothing to do with hospital care, unless those facts include $$$$ with a lot of zeros behind them. Of course we can't officially bind together or we become a union, but as a bunch of individuals we are just trying to rock the boat. And when we begin to do that, we start to get selectively eliminated, 1 by 1.

    I just can't think of what I could do by myself, especially if the people I'm trying to appeal to aren't listening. Maybe I'm misinterpreting your post, but I get the sense that you have an insight that I'm lacking. A way of bringing about change without sacrificing my job/license. Please share it with me, because when I return to TX I won't have my ratios to protect my license. Or would your suggestion be to do some of the things I've mentioned and hope for the best?
  8. by   LPNer

    This is what really drives me crazy about RNs who criticize CNA, just because they don't like the union's image and some of the things they do. They don't even pay union dues, and still benefit from ratios .... yet they complain.

    If CNA wasn't around, and if there wasn't a ratio law, then they'd be complaining about having to juggle up to 12 patients at one time.

    You have to wonder what these people are thinking. Would they prefer no CNA and no ratio law and much heavier patient loads? Just so their polite "image" of nursing could remain intact?

    I've said it before but it's worth repeating: 60,000 RN's pay union dues so more han 300,000 California RNs could benefit from ratios. That means only 20 percent of the RNs in this state are actually footing the bill for this effort while the remaining 80 percent benefit yet, they don't have to pay anything.

    Yet ... some of them have the gall to complain and complain.

    It's truly outrageous.

    :angryfire

    Do you honestly believe 60,000 RNs, running around making a nuisance of themselves in public places, where they were not invited actually make a difference?
    Seems to me, at a particular social event, celebrating a business where "extras" are considered "set dressing" you would understand the futility of your actions.
    There are many organizations working to better health care in this country, 60,000 RNs, no matter how big a collective mouth they have are not the saviors of Cali's health care woes.
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from LPNer
    Do you honestly believe 60,000 RNs, running around making a nuisance of themselves in public places, where they were not invited actually make a difference?
    Seems to me, at a particular social event, celebrating a business where "extras" are considered "set dressing" you would understand the futility of your actions.
    There are many organizations working to better health care in this country, 60,000 RNs, no matter how big a collective mouth they have are not the saviors of Cali's health care woes.
    Quite frankly, you don't have a clue. It does make a difference.

    Since CNA started their campaign, Schwarzenegger's approval rating has dropped 10 points. And that was before firefighters, teachers jumped on the bandwagon and started protesting the governor as well.

    If CNA was really viewed as a "nuisance," as you call it, Schwarzenegger's approval rating would be up, not down.

    CNA may not be the savior of healthcare, but they certainly have helped nurses. They not only passed the ratio law and the lift team bill, but they have successfully fought off two court challenges on the ratio law. That is nothing short of spectacular.

    CNA has single handedly driven up wages and benefits in my area. When they organized one hospital, all of the others increased wages and benefits because they were so afraid of CNA coming into their facilities. For years nurses were commuting elsewhere because wages and benefits in this area were so low. CNA was the only organization who made a difference.

    It takes a "big mouth" to get things done. It's funny how people like you only focus on the superficial things, and refuse to look at their actual track record, which is phenomenal.

    :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 19, '05
  10. by   LPNer
    Quote from fergus51
    ... to disolve the BON and say people could be trained to monitor both auto mechanics and nurses. How can anyone do these things if they respect nurses?
    Ohio is going in this direction too. I read it not long ago and can't find it now! Darn! It was very interesting to see that the state believes nursing can be "governed" by those who govern other licensed professions.
    I agree with it to a point right now.
    I am excited to see what direction this will take. There are professionals in all sorts of areas, with technical education all the way up to doctorate.
    It's an exciting time and I hope to be active in the whole proccess! Now, if I can just find that darn email newsletter! Bet I threw it away.
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.thedesertsun.com/apps/pbc...ionCat=opinion

    Governor's 'reforms' threaten to wipe out fundamental values

    Rose Ann DeMoro
    Special to The Desert Sun
    April 9, 2005

    Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger must be wondering if someone gave him the wrong script. In the movies, our action figure governor gets to trample over anyone in his way.

    In real life, those he tries to brush aside as the annoying "extras" on his set are not robots but the real-life heroes of our society - firefighters, teachers and nurses.

    While some pundits try to pigeonhole the current debate into the more familiar terrain of a narrow partisan Republican-Democrat spat, the stakes are far greater for the most fundamental values of our society - quality education, patient-safety standards, retirement security for our families, respect for the rights of working people, dignity for our most vulnerable neighbors, and preservation of our democracy.

    Schwarzenegger waltzed into office marketing his celebrity and a self-fashioned image of a "populist" who would root the money grubbers out of Sacramento and "could not be bought" due to his own personal fortune.

    But the faade has undergone an extreme makeover. Californians today see a typical politician mouthing the rhetoric of reform while shattering all records for the fundraising he once mocked, virtually all of it coming from wealthy interests who benefit financially from the tsunami of dollars they bestow on the governor.

    Those $100,000-a-plate dinners (each of which would pay for a $10 meal every day for the next 27 years for the rest of us) come with a steep price - the promise of deregulation, privatization, increased corporate control over our daily lives, and the wholesale auction of our health, education and public protections to the highest bidder.

    An example is the pharmaceutical industry, whose top 50 companies made $55 billion in profits last year.

    Schwarzenegger last year vetoed bills to assist the import of affordable prescription drugs from Canada. He's now promoting "voluntary" reductions by an industry that is notorious for a lack of restraint.

    In return, Big Pharma is a major donor to Schwarzenegger and is bankrolling an initiative to restrict the ability of unions, who have dared to challenge the governor, to participate in the political process.

    Review some of the governor's other "reforms":
    Privatization of pensions for public employees, a transfer of hundreds of millions of dollars to Wall Street, a model to be quickly followed in the private sector in concert with the Bush administration's bid to privatize Social Security. Though this week the governor announced plans to pull back this initiative, the proposal is still on the table and could be placed on the ballot next year.

    Rollback of minimum-safety protections for hospital patients, part of a larger goal of deregulation of all healthcare protections to swell the profits of his healthcare industry donors.

    Reduced funding for education and employment security for teachers, something likely to further undercut our schools and widen the chasm between those who can afford quality education and those who cannot.

    Mean-spirited attacks on the poor, the disadvantaged and the sick, symbolized by a plan to seize the homes and other assets of the families of deceased Medi-Cal recipients and cut the number of nursing beds available to ill residents of veterans' homes.

    An offensive against working people, including restricting the right to meals and breaks, vetoing a raise in the minimum wage and the much ballyhooed workers compensation plan, which cut disability payments by up to 70 percent.

    Schwarzenegger has usurped the role of the Legislature through bogus "emergency" regulations and cynical manipulation of the initiative process through threats to legislators to cave in to his proposals or face elections in which he can overwhelm opponents with massive fundraising.

    The governor has also worked to manipulate the media with Hollywood-style staged events and the production of fake video news release, and demonized unions in an effort to silence the collective voice of working people.

    This is not just a bad infomercial. In Schwarzenegger's world, no one is safe when democracy and our basic protections and rights are under assault - except for the big corporations, who are abetted by their cheerleader in Sacramento.

    Rose Ann DeMoro is executive director of the California Nurses Association.
  12. by   begalli
    inside politics

    by greg pierce
    published april 8, 2005

    arnold backs down
    under pressure from firefighters and police officers, california gov. arnold schwarzenegger backed off, for now, from his plan to privatize california's public employee pension system.
    the republican said "misconceptions" among firefighters and police officers that privatization would strip them of death and disability benefits had come to dominate the issue.
    over the past few weeks, mr. schwarzenegger has waged a campaign to put privatization on the ballot during a special election next fall. but yesterday he said he would wait until the june 2006 election if lawmakers did not craft a compromise measure in the coming months.
    "let's pull it back and do it better," said mr. schwarzenegger, flanked by more than a dozen police, fire and local government leaders.
    the move followed days of meetings with police and fire chiefs and survivors of firefighters and police officers killed in the line of duty, all of whom expressed concerns that the ballot language opened the possibility that the employees would lose death and disability payments, the associated press reports.
    the attorney general's office, analyzing the proposed ballot language, earlier had reached the same conclusion.
    mr. schwarzenegger said that was not his intention.
    the governor, who has called the state's pension system "another government program out of control," wanted to hold down the state's escalating pension contributions by making new employees open 401(k)-style individual investment accounts.
    the state's contribution to the pension system this year is $2.6 billion, up from $160 million in 2000.

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/funct...7-114824-4195r

    ------------------------------------------


    this article just proves that arnold doesn't have a clue and he's a fool! he's out there whining for changes while he doesn't even understand what impact the changes will have.



    one down....
  13. by   mdfog10
    Arnold thinks he can apply movie principles to running the Great State of California, he is wrong. This is real life. All the protests I have attended, teachers and firefighters have said "THANK YOU", thank you to the Nurses that started this....

    He is a multimillionare and will never suffer the decisions he wants to make. When people of his notoriety get admitted to a hospital the rules change. He would probably have his own nurse and everyone would be alerted to make sure no mistakes happen. His children go to PRIVATE SCHOOLS so they will never suffer from his cuts and broken promises.

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