Schwarzenegger Says Nurses are "Set Dressing" - page 13

And the hits just keep on coming ... :uhoh21: According to the Sacramento Bee, Gov. Schwarzenegger had this to say about protesting nurses in California: "They are becoming now more and more... Read More

  1. by   nurseinmilo
    [size=4]

    it seems that nobody understands the nursing shortage until they experience health problems and need to use the health care system.......(that is my first thought)(this is my second thought).....bottom line seems to be the driving factor in most settings.. face it people.....republicans are for corporate profit and democrats are for the people....that is the way it always has been and the was it still is.
  2. by   nocalmomo
    I am one of 36.5 MILLION Californians. I do not know Babs, nor Cher, nor do they speak for me. What I do know is that the end justifies the means. If we had not gotten that publicity, we would not have gotten the LAW of the ratios "unfrozen". We have the worst, (49th out of 50) patient to RN ratios in the country , with the most population. Do not contunue to get your infromation from TV or newspapers, it is skewed by the corporate BILLIONAIRES who run hospitals here, & in other states. Yes, I know you are not in Calif. It's obvious . I am impressed that you are a CRNA, however I have a MSN, too. If we work & STAND together for our patients, there is nothing we can't do . Thank you , I feel better , now.
    Quote from NGACRNA
    [Schwarzenegger himself is dismissive of the protesters who are becoming a regular part of his political road show.

    "They are becoming now more and more part of the set dressing," he said in an interview this week. "It's kind of like the extras when you do a movie and you need extras in the background. That's what they've become. That's fine

    Hmmm, sounds like he's referring to those nurses from the CNA that continue to "storm" his speaking engagements, NOT all nurses. He is "dismissive of the protesters", NOT all nurses.

    We, as nurses, need to consider what is good for the whole country, not just our little piece of it. If you want socialized medicine, please leave this country (and take Alec Baldwin and Cher and Babs with you).

    I am now ready to receive a mountain of criticism because I'm:
    1. Not in California
    2. A CRNA

    But let's keep it civilized, shall we?
  3. by   nurseinmilo
    we have socialized medicine.....i beg to differ! i work with the poorest and the sickest.....vent patients most who are on medcaid...do u know how hard it is to find a urologist who accepts medcaid to place a supra pubic cath that needs to be done? do you know how hard it is to get a colostomy and set them up for a surgical procedure in a hospital... yes maybe the emergency room HAS to accept all....but believe me the hospital does not!!! the unfortunate truth is as i have said ITS THE BOTTOM LINE....WHAT ? THE BOTTOM LINE.....unfortunately for our patients...
  4. by   michelleicu
    wow ,arnold should take it easy cause if he got sick and has to go to hospital,who's gonna care for him?a nurse right?
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Arnie need not worry Michelle. Folks like him will either end up in VIP suites or have a private nurse assigned to them for care. The shortage won't touch people like him. So he feels emboldened to say the things he does. He will NOT have to share one RN with 7 or 8 other sick patients, in this lifetime.
  6. by   tshores
    Quote from jtfreel
    There are some truths in what he says:

    He did not call professional nurses set dressing, he said that the group representing the CNA has become set dressing at his public gatherings.

    If the CNA is acting like the Teamster's Union, they should not object to being described as such. If they are truly interested in patient care, then why are their counterattacks personal?

    My fear is in that igniting an emotional reaction against GOV Schwarzenegger among its membership, that the position of professional nursing loses some of its professionalism. This tactic, to me, is a political maneuver.

    There are other truths: we are fragmented as a profession with no unified assosciation to represent professional nursing concerns. Many people believe that only the powerless need unionization. If nursing is a profession, for many, the need then to unionize conflicts with that image.

    I also believe that we, as the profession, have given away much of our influence and power for well meant though misguided reasons over the years and that nursing administration and nursing academics have played equally important roles in this process.

    I also believe that nursing is incredibly important to the healthcare of this nation and that, as a profession, we are a vital force in this process and could (if we got our act together) be a powerful collaborative influence.

    Their counterattacks are personal because he personally decided to override the law on the nurse/patient ratio. Just like he personally decided to override a bill already passed in the House and Senate that would disallow home foreclosures for $125 fees imposed by homeowner associations (Go in ahrc.com and you'll see how much he's loved there). I'm sure the CAI lawyers helped him reason that one out. Despite what he said before he entered office, he's for big business and money--those are HIS special interests. Hospitals are big business. And I thought California was still a democracy...who the hell does he think he is?!? Do you REALLY think he'll sit down and discuss the situation with nurses who're acting 'professionally' when he won't listen to the House and Senate? And, for you nurses who want to be 'professional' about all this, what solutions do you offer besides your philosophy about being professional? The rest of us want you to offer some concrete problem-solving solutions here.

    And, as already pointed out earlier, there are other professions who unionize.

    Yes, we are fragmented. It has nothing to do with an ADN/BSN "mentality" either. I'm an ADN from the 70's who went back in the 90's for a BSN. A degree has nothing to do with what you see at the bedside. The fragmentation comes from the fact that there are those of us who want to sit on our butts and politely say, "No, you can't do that," as someone hits us over the head--like we've always done in the past because that's being "professional"--doesn't accomplish anything, but we think we look good sitting there, being professional. It may be okay for a while...until they hit us again. Then there's those of us who will jump up and defend ourselves. And I say it's past time to jump up.
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Actually, I'm fairly new at this nurse stuff but I'm old too . I would never sit and let someone continue to hit me over the head. There is a third option to your scenerio and that is to stand up and not ever let yourself be taken advantage of by anyone. I don't have to get in anyone's face to do that.

    What bothers me is the us vs. them mentality. . . . like all hospitals are evil and all nurses are angels. I think there is a middle ground.

    steph
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Mar 6, '05
  8. by   swimmingduck
    From sfgate.com
    SACRAMENTO
    1-to-5 nurse-patient ratio must be met, judge says
    Ruling on state's hospitals is upheld, overriding governor
    - Lynda Gledhill, Chronicle Sacramento Bureau
    Saturday, March 5, 2005


    Sacramento -- California hospitals must comply with a more stringent nurse-to-patient ratio, according to a Friday court ruling that critics say may force hospitals to close.

    Superior Court Judge Judy Hersher rejected Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's attempt to use emergency regulations to stop a 1-to-5 nurse-to-patient ratio from going into effect at the beginning of this year. The 1999 law that made California the first state in the nation to set minimum staffing ratios set a 1-to-6 ratio starting Jan. 1, 2004, for all medical and surgical wards.

    A request for a stay until the matter is appealed was denied, meaning the order could go into effect as soon as Monday. The administration and the California Hospital Association both pledged to immediately appeal the decision.

    "Today's decision will force hospitals to choose between closing beds and eliminating patient care services in order to comply with the 1-to-5 ratio or breaking the law and caring for patients,'' said C. Duane Dauner, president of the California Hospital Association.

    The judge, however, said the administration "failed to convince the court that there is a substantial risk of harm" if the lower ratio was upheld. Hersher issued a tentative ruling Thursday and upheld it Friday after hearing from both sides.

    Nurses, who have protested the governor since he issued the emergency order in November, were thrilled with the outcome. About 100 nurses rallied outside the courthouse, blocking the rain with red and white California Nurses Association umbrellas.

    "This is a great victory for nurses and a great victory for patients," said Rose Ann DeMoro, executive director of the nurses association.

    They aren't going to let up on the governor, however. They will join out-of-state nurses to protest Schwarzenegger at the Arnold Classic bodybuilding contest in Ohio this weekend and at his fundraisers in New York City and Washington, D.C., next week.

    "I think this is a huge blow to the governor," DeMoro said. "Schwarzenegger cannot ride roughshod over the law, over us, or over California patients."

    At issue is a 1999 law signed by Gov. Gray Davis that directed the Department of Health Services to set minimum safe level standard nurse-to-patient ratios. The department set a ratio of 1 nurse to every 6 patients beginning Jan. 1, 2004, with the number of patients per nurse dropping to 5 at the start of this year.

    The administration's emergency declaration blocked the lower ratio from taking effect, keeping in place the 1-to-6 ratio for medical and surgical wards.

    Some hospitals, such as Kaiser, already comply with the 1-to-5 requirements, according to the nurses association.

    Throughout the process of the law being passed and the regulations drawn up, the hospital association protested, saying the increased costs of hiring more nurses would result in hospital closures.

    "It is a very serious thing to have a hospital close -- they are a scarce and necessary resource," said Robert Leventhal, who represented the California Hospital Association. "We can see that they are closing."

    That remained their argument in court Friday, suggesting that the 1-to-6 ratio is actually the safe standard, and that the state was simply trying to "raise the bar" by putting in more stringent standards.

    "It was nothing but a discretionary enrichment," said Deputy Attorney General Janie Daigle. "The Department of Health Services thought they could build on the minimum, but taking into account real-world factors, they realized one year was not enough."

    This new argument was met with skepticism by the nurses association and the judge, who said it was "not supported by the facts or the law."

    "There has been no mention of discretionary enhancement until this morning -- and this law was passed in 1999," said James Eggleston, the nurses' lawyer.

    The judge also rejected the notion that an emergency existed, saying there was no new evidence that hospitals or patients were suffering because of the staffing ratios.

    "Not only was it old news, but it was also hearsay news," she said during arguments. "You were saying it was an emergency, but the same places had said for the four or five years previous that they were having the same problems."

    The judge noted that the California Hospital Association tried to change the ratios by introducing a bill in the Legislature last year, but that attempted failed.

    The administration is in the process of creating new regulations re-examining the staffing ratios. Those new regulations, if different from what is currently in place, will be challenged in court, the nurses association said.

    Page B - 7
    URL: http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cg.../05/NURSES.TMP
  9. by   LPNer
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    Set dressing?????

    "Would you like some mustard with your foot Governor S.?"
    I took that to mean they were simply there (in the instance referred to.)
    I do not think he meant to say that all nurses are always set dressing.
    Gees, don't take everything so personal and don't think everything said refers to everything else.
    Many times a person will say something, taken out of context, that seems horrible. This time, he was only referring to one incidient!

    Where does all this paranoia come from among nurses?
  10. by   CHATSDALE
    old saying it is the squeaky wheel that gets the grease
    this has been used for civil rights, womens rights, gay issues etc etc
    if no one spoke up then it would be said that everyone was happy..nothing needed to be done
    protesting nurses show just as much if not more professionalism as the non-protesting ones...they go out on their own time and work to improve the system for their patients and for their couch potato co-workers they keep the issue before the public..

    everyone knew that when he spoke of the set dressing he was referring to the demonstrating nurses, but if you really listen to the meaning behind the words:
    he was saying your opinion doesn't count and i am going to make fun of you to the media so that we can have a big laugh and forget about you
    if you don't like your working condiitions i will tell the kpublic that you are trying to raise the cost of medial care so much that when their children get sick they can not be care for
    the nursing shortage will not end until workig conditions change and the mass exodus from hospital come to an end///many nurses prefer bedside nurses which is why they went into the profession in first place but their real education starts when they get in a situaiton that is so typical...you endanger your patient and your license = time to walk

    and i cannot understand the slurring to other parts of the community...truck drivers, republicans, they are all just people going to work, making a living and raising they family..cut a little slack here
  11. by   MissPiggy
    Quote from tshores
    Their counterattacks are personal because he personally decided to override the law on the nurse/patient ratio. Just like he personally decided to override a bill already passed in the House and Senate that would disallow home foreclosures for $125 fees imposed by homeowner associations (Go in ahrc.com and you'll see how much he's loved there). I'm sure the CAI lawyers helped him reason that one out. Despite what he said before he entered office, he's for big business and money--those are HIS special interests. Hospitals are big business. And I thought California was still a democracy...who the hell does he think he is?!? Do you REALLY think he'll sit down and discuss the situation with nurses who're acting 'professionally' when he won't listen to the House and Senate? And, for you nurses who want to be 'professional' about all this, what solutions do you offer besides your philosophy about being professional? The rest of us want you to offer some concrete problem-solving solutions here.

    And, as already pointed out earlier, there are other professions who unionize.

    Yes, we are fragmented. It has nothing to do with an ADN/BSN "mentality" either. I'm an ADN from the 70's who went back in the 90's for a BSN. A degree has nothing to do with what you see at the bedside. The fragmentation comes from the fact that there are those of us who want to sit on our butts and politely say, "No, you can't do that," as someone hits us over the head--like we've always done in the past because that's being "professional"--doesn't accomplish anything, but we think we look good sitting there, being professional. It may be okay for a while...until they hit us again. Then there's those of us who will jump up and defend ourselves. And I say it's past time to jump up.
    Well said, tshores!
  12. by   Arizona RN Activist
    Quote from SMK1
    i'd be interested in noting how many jobs that require a minimum of a 4 yr degree have unions? I have a feeling one of the ANA's issues with CNA is that they don't believe "Professionals" have unions and they want nursing to regarded by all as a white collar 4 yr degreed profession. I think i'll try a searc when i get a chance to see what other jobs have unions specifically for them even though they are "professions" as defined by a bachelors degree or higher entry level.

    It is difficult to understand this argument, that the ANA does not believe in unions, since they run the largest nurses union in the country: United American Nurses. (Check the ANA website). The ANA even recognizes that unionizing can be good for nurses and patients as reflected in their Code of Ethics.
    But what they don't understand is that nurses across the country are contacting CNA for help because ANA refuses to stand up and take a meaningful stand for bedside nurses. It is their own failure that is catapulting CNA into the national arena, and I can't wait to be part of it. I am tired of standing by while my professional practice is dismantled by the use of unlicensed (read: $cheap$) caregivers, suppressed wages, and distractions into "advanced practice." The bedside nurse is uniquely positioned to positively influence patient outcomes. The practice should be supported and expanded through regulatory and legislative means, if necessary.
    Why should a physician write "nursing orders?" That should be our job. And the physicians I know would happily give it up!
  13. by   prmenrs
    Teachers have unions, and they do, on occassion, strike.

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