S. 497, The Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development Act of 2009

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    S. 497, The Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development Act of 2009

    http://www.washingtonwatch.com/bills...11_SN_497.html

    Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development Act of 2009 - Amends the Public Health Service Act to require the Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), to award a grant to each eligible school of nursing to increase the number of nursing faculty and students.

    Requires such schools to formulate and implement a plan to accomplish at least two of specified goals, which include: (1) establishing or significantly expanding an accelerated baccalaureate degree nursing program designed to graduate new nurses in 12 to 18 months; (2) establishing cooperative interdisciplinary training between schools of nursing and other specified health related fields; (3) increasing admissions, enrollment, and retention of qualified individuals who are financially disadvantaged; (4) increasing enrollment of minority and diverse student populations; (5) increasing enrollment of new graduate baccalaureate nursing students in graduate programs that educate nurse faculty members; (6) developing post-baccalaureate residency programs to prepare nurses for practice in specialty areas where nursing shortages are more severe; and (7) increasing integration of geriatric content into the core curriculum.

    In my opinion can't happen soon enough, looks like it is in the Senate and should vote on this , this will help the "nursing shortage".
    Chanta2 and lindarn like this.
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  4. 7 Comments so far...

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    There is no nursing shortage. Go ask any new graduate of an accelerated BSN program or just a regular BSN program or an ASN program.

    There is a shortage of nurses willing to work for $20 an hour during the graveyard shift with some of the worst possible working conditions.

    Instead of having the govt help pump out new grads, why don't we have the govt help hospitals pay nurses more. That would probably get the 500,000 RNs sitting on the sidelines back into the nursing working world.
    Chanta2, anoro, Carliestarling, and 3 others like this.
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    Amen to that! There is no nursing shortage in my area. They need to provide money to hospitals to train new nurses, because they don't want us because we cost a lot to train. They want experience, and don't want us.

    The hospitals can pay nurses more - the CEOs don't want to give up their several million dollar incomes.

    Now, in about say 10 years - there will be a desperate nursing shortage when the baby boomers start falling apart. Maybe that is why the "shortage" stories keep flying around!
    Last edit by Platypus on May 31, '09 : Reason: forgot to add something
    Chanta2, iteachob, and hope3456 like this.
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    Quote from Alexk49
    S. 497, The Nurse Education, Expansion, and Development Act of 2009

    Requires such schools to formulate and implement a plan to accomplish at least two of specified goals, which include: (1) establishing or significantly expanding an accelerated baccalaureate degree nursing program designed to graduate new nurses in 12 to 18 months; (2) establishing cooperative interdisciplinary training between schools of nursing and other specified health related fields; (3) increasing admissions, enrollment, and retention of qualified individuals who are financially disadvantaged; (4) increasing enrollment of minority and diverse student populations; (5) increasing enrollment of new graduate baccalaureate nursing students in graduate programs that educate nurse faculty members; (6) developing post-baccalaureate residency programs to prepare nurses for practice in specialty areas where nursing shortages are more severe; and (7) increasing integration of geriatric content into the core curriculum.
    While several of these goals are laudable and logical, I have to question the wisdom of a couple of others.

    Goal #5 states, "increasing enrollment of new graduate baccalaureate nursing students in graduate programs that will educate nurse faculty members." I'm not entirely comfortable with the notion of fresh out of school BSN students bypassing clinical experience and going straight to graduate school in order to teach. While that model works for other academic disciplines, nursing demands not only that its faculty be educated, it also requires that the faculty have a level of clinical mastery. Someone who goes from freshly minted BSN straight to MSN or PhD might be able to analyze concepts and explain nursing theories but a level of clinical competence is necessary to have the credibility to teach. As per Benner's model of novice to expert, it takes experience and time to develop that level of competence. While it may not be possible for every instructor in every program to be an expert nurse, is it really wise for someone at a novice level in terms of clinical experience to be teaching student nurses? Rather, I would like to see some sort of system in which experienced nurses, even those without BSNs, can get into graduate school and into teaching positions. I'd like to see more emphasis on RN to MSN or PhD degrees and LPN to BSN programs, rather than making people jump through hoops of LPN to RN to BSN to MSN to PhD in order to gain academic credentials. How about joint programs between health care facilities and schools of nursing that would provide for joint appointments, allowing nurses with clinical expertise to remain on the staff of those facilities while teaching and going to graduate school one course at a time?

    Goal #6 calls for "developing post-baccalaureate residency programs to prepare nurses for practice in specialty areas where nursing shortages are more severe." Why limit this to post-baccalaureate programs? Why not have residency programs for ADNs or LPNs?While we still have multiple levels of practice it doesn't make sense that residency programs should be limited to the graduates of only one type of program. Moreover, can we really predict the specialty areas in which there will be a "severe" nursing shortage? Certainly, there will be a greater demand for gerontological nurses as the Baby Boom generation ages. However, might more nurses be attracted to gerontology if there were better hours, better wages, better working conditions? Can we anticipate the changes in health care (such as a shift to wellness care) in innovative ways or are schools of nursing simply going to churn out new graduates by the bucketful?

    I see this act as a step in the right direction but it is not the perfect answer to the many issues facing nursing education today.
    Chanta2, Carliestarling, and mochabean like this.
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    I just emailed my state representative about this. I informed her that new graduate RN's are currently having problems finding jobs and that the funding should be going to hospitals so that they can take on more new grads.
    Chanta2 and AZ_LPN_8_26_13 like this.
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    They don't want to pay for experience either. At my hospital if a nurse retires and works at a per diem rate she is paid less than if she had not taken retirement. This has led to nurses just opting to take retirement and get out when the hospital could very much benefit from them working per diem. There is a huge seasonal shift in work load here so it doesn't pay to hire someone full time or part time and have to pay them through the times when it is slow. As it is when it is slow here my department has set up an informal way of taking turns in volunteering for days off instead of being called off but either way we still take vacation days or go without pay. HOw long can that go on before people get sick of taking unplanned time? And then, when it is busy we are slammed and working until late at night and expected to come in the next day or stay home without pay (I work in the OR and we are only staffed until 3:30 then it is the call team's responsibility to finish left over surgeries). Maybe we would benefit from having a half year late shift, but who wants to volunteer for that? Per diem staff seems to be the most seamless solution and if we could get the retirees to work as per diem it would cut down on training costs.
    Chanta2 likes this.
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    sorry if the last reply was a little disorganized but it was also kind of a personal rant. one other thing i wanted to add was that state schools should have to educate a certain percentage of nursing students from within the state. i ran into a problem a few years ago at my state university where i was denied admission into the nursing school but could stay undeclared and i had a 3.86 GPA. my friend from out of state got in with a 3.1 and i had finished more pre-reqs. the only reason i could come up with for this to happen was that i was on academic scholarship and she was paying out of state, out of pocket in full. now i'm working in the state and she is not. how does that benefit the state in the long run?
    Chanta2 likes this.
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    Truly there are some areas of the country that have no shortage, but this is not true of every area. Not only that, but in a recession, inactive (experienced) nurses will go back to work, hence the difficulty for new (inexperienced) grads to find a job. Where do you think they'll go after the recession is over? They won't all stay at work.

    It is very short-sighted to not realize that in the rather near future (10-20 years) a LARGE number of nurses are going to retire. The boomers are getting older, and living longer.

    There is a catastrophe on the horizon. I think that bills such as these are desperately needed, and even so, probably won't begin to avoid the looming crisis.
    Chanta2 likes this.


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