RN Lactation Experts To Be Replaced - page 3

Susan J. DiMario suspected things were not going as well as described in medical notes the minute she walked into the new mother's hospital room. Although everything looked fine-the baby was... Read More

  1. Visit  HazelLPN} profile page
    4
    I don't think that non nursing professionals understand what IBCLCs in the NICU do. When I was doing NICU, we had two IBCLCs on staff who worked on the unit part time doing patient care and were lactation consultants part time for the entire house. I can't imagine having a non RN/LPN IBCLC who was not an experienced NICU nurse. Anyone ever get pulled to NICU were you were given "easy" feeder growers? Anyone frustrated that these babies are sometimes very difficult to feed because they have been on the vent so long and "forget" how to eat...or they just get too tired? Imagine how these mothers feel who are trying their best to do the right thing for the baby and and these already challenging to feed kids are refusing to breast feed? I have had mothers in tears because the baby wouldn't eat and thank goodness for our lactation specialists in the unit who can explain the WHYs and HOWs of the problems and solutions giving sound medical advice. A well meaning person who isn't an RN or an LPN who had success in breastfeeding their own children who trained to be an IBCLC might be okay for new mothers with healthy children at home, but not for the most tiny and vulnerable patients in the NICU.

    Good old Lindarn is right about taking the cue from teachers. Years ago, teachers didn't have BA/BS degrees. They went to one year teacher colleges (for elementary, high school always needed a degree I think). Through the years, these teacher colleges were phased out and now most veteran teachers hold M.Ed./M.A. or M.S. degrees. This gives them more ammunation when advocating for more autonomy and higher pay. I don't think we need to kick nurses with less formal education to the curb because we need to respect their years of experience and knowledge base that came from experience that no amount of formal education can give, but if the BSN requirement is phased in (while grandfathering the LPNs/ADN/diploma RNs) I do believe nursing will be seen as a more respected profession and we can avoid being dictated to by management who are not nursing professionals.

    Best to you,
    Mrs H.
    mystory, cdsga, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  klone} profile page
    4
    Quote from HazelLPN
    A well meaning person who isn't an RN or an LPN who had success in breastfeeding their own children who trained to be an IBCLC might be okay for new mothers with healthy children at home, but not for the most tiny and vulnerable patients in the NICU..
    You have GOT to be kidding me.

    THIS is a prime example of why IBCLCs get NO respect.

    I think you are confusing IBCLCs with La Leche League Leaders, who are peer counselors trained to handle basic breastfeeding issues with healthy babies.

    Do you know how long it took me to accrue all the training and experience required to sit for the IBCLC exam? 10 years. Yes, I said that right. 10 years. (btw, it only took me FOUR years to get my RN). 4000 HOURS of consultancy experience. I wasn't simply a "woman who had success in breastfeeding her own children."

    I'm so offended by what you wrote that I'm having a hard time formulating a coherent response.

    An IBCLC has more experience and training with handling complex breastfeeding issues than most PHYSICIANS. And like I said in my first post, the knowledge and training they get, they didn't get in nursing school.
    mystory, cdsga, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  cdsga} profile page
    2
    Just like everything else in women's health-played down and ignored. Breast feeding, it's just natural-dang girl, God gave you breasts, don't you know how to use em? I swear, from chronic anemia, carrying around fibroids, unwarranted c-sections, placenta percretas from all the c-sections, breast cancer, thyroid disease, hormone upheaval-to take HRT or just "sweat it out", I agree with you-I don't have the words.
    mystory and lindarn like this.
  5. Visit  lindarn} profile page
    2
    Quote from HazelLPN
    I don't think that non nursing professionals understand what IBCLCs in the NICU do. When I was doing NICU, we had two IBCLCs on staff who worked on the unit part time doing patient care and were lactation consultants part time for the entire house. I can't imagine having a non RN/LPN IBCLC who was not an experienced NICU nurse. Anyone ever get pulled to NICU were you were given "easy" feeder growers? Anyone frustrated that these babies are sometimes very difficult to feed because they have been on the vent so long and "forget" how to eat...or they just get too tired? Imagine how these mothers feel who are trying their best to do the right thing for the baby and and these already challenging to feed kids are refusing to breast feed? I have had mothers in tears because the baby wouldn't eat and thank goodness for our lactation specialists in the unit who can explain the WHYs and HOWs of the problems and solutions giving sound medical advice. A well meaning person who isn't an RN or an LPN who had success in breastfeeding their own children who trained to be an IBCLC might be okay for new mothers with healthy children at home, but not for the most tiny and vulnerable patients in the NICU.

    Good old Lindarn is right about taking the cue from teachers. Years ago, teachers didn't have BA/BS degrees. They went to one year teacher colleges (for elementary, high school always needed a degree I think). Through the years, these teacher colleges were phased out and now most veteran teachers hold M.Ed./M.A. or M.S. degrees. This gives them more ammunation when advocating for more autonomy and higher pay. I don't think we need to kick nurses with less formal education to the curb because we need to respect their years of experience and knowledge base that came from experience that no amount of formal education can give, but if the BSN requirement is phased in (while grandfathering the LPNs/ADN/diploma RNs) I do believe nursing will be seen as a more respected profession and we can avoid being dictated to by management who are not nursing professionals.

    Best to you,
    Mrs H.
    Thank you for the complement! I do have to scratch my head in awe, when I hear nurses say, "so we all have BSN! We get a generous $0.50 and hour raise for all of our education and work"!!

    Hello!! Did teachers settle for a measly $0.50 raise when they increased their entry into practice? Or when PTs and Pharmacist, went to a doctorate? Or OTs who went to a Masters?

    So why do we have to wait for hospitals to recognize and monetarily reward a higher educational level? Why do we have to wait for someone to offer? Why are we not DEMANDING more money??

    Why do nurses always sell themselves short like this? And we wonder why no one takes us seriously!!
    Why do we wait and beg for better staffing? What is wrong with the concept of, "just say no"!! I will not take any more patients. Call in more staff , or do it yourself! Sorry if you got a run in your pantyhose".

    We need more assertive nurses, who have enbraced unionizing. Spare me the anti union rhetoric. Unionizing is the ONLY thing that will save the nursing profession. Just look at how it has helped the Australian nurses.

    First with staffing ratios,they can close units to maintain staffing ratios, they are represented by the SAME national Australian Nurses Union. ALL of the Australian nurses belong to the same National union. THAT is power!!

    JMHO and my NY 0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    Last edit by lindarn on Dec 1, '11
    HazelLPN and dirtyhippiegirl like this.
  6. Visit  newtress} profile page
    4
    Lindarn has put the entire nursing conundrum in perspective. Thank you, thank you for saying exactly what the nursing profession desperately needs. Strength in numbers and very loud voices joining in solidarity for unionizing ALL nurses just as much as ALL autoworkers, ALL pipefitters, ALL teachers and ALL firefighters are, and it matters and speaks volumes to management and to the public. It is the only thing that will put nursing back into perspective.
    GooeyRN, lindarn, Ayala, and 1 other like this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top