Repost: 18 mo later Hurricane Katrina Continues Its Assault on New Orleans

  1. from nurse.com:
    craig guillot
    sunday may 6, 2007

    hurricane katrina continues its assault on new orleans
    eighteen months after the country's worst natural disaster, new orleans is still struggling to recover. the city -- both its population and landscape -- has changed in profound ways.

    nurses in high demand

    jo ann clark, rn, msn, edd, , executive director of the louisiana state nurses association, says that there was already a shortage of nurses in some areas of practice and the state before katrina. prior to katrina, many hospitals were lacking nurses for certain shifts and departments, but that problem has significantly worsened in new orleans since katrina. clark says that while nurses have returned to new orleans, many are growing tired of the long shifts and protracted periods of time without any relief.

    "as they reach that stressed-out point, i think it's possible that you'll see some more leave. i think it would help out if they could see some relief but i don't think you're seeing that because of the schools, housing, and safety issues," says clark. "after a while, people reach that exhaustion point."

    ochsner health system, which operates seven hospitals in the new orleans area, has seen a steady rebound in nursing staff since the storm but is still short in some areas. oschsner chief nursing officer and senior vice president nancy davis, rn, says that ochsner lost 65 percent of its nursing staff immediately after the storm.

    although the main hospital has stabilized and is now to about a two percent turnover rate, davis notes that the west bank campus has huge demands and could open more beds if there were more staff. ochsner is reactivating their regional pools and running campaigns to attract more nurses to the area but she says candidates are expressing concerns about moving to the city.

    "it's not all doom and gloom but we've really had to fight the picture that the national media has painted. we're very concerned because of this perception of crime and hopelessness that is out there," says clark.

    in ochsner's ed, joseph guarisco, md, said that the situation is bordering on chaos. during peak hours he said there is significant difficulty in meeting patient demands. the ed is down about 12 nurses from an ideal staff of 70 and, while there is some stabilization, he worries about any possible growth in the population. most of the patients the ed sees are uninsured and, due to a lack of emergency departments in the city, there is an increased load.

    "we thought almost two years past katrina, things would be a little bit better but, actually, the demand for emergency services has only gotten worse. this crisis of health care in new orleans is actually happening now rather than 18 months ago," says guarisco. ...
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on May 6, '07
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   noggin_wise
    I believe the crime in New Orleans is a very valid concern. New Orleans is a prime example of the devastation that the "nanny state" leaves people. People in these areas can't and won't do for themselves because the government has always done it for them. Now you see the end result.
  4. by   FocusRN
    Quote from noggin_wise
    I believe the crime in New Orleans is a very valid concern. New Orleans is a prime example of the devastation that the "nanny state" leaves people. People in these areas can't and won't do for themselves because the government has always done it for them. Now you see the end result.
    Okay, as a New Orleanian, born and raised, I think I have something to say about this. The crime in New Orleans, is now, always has been, and sadly most likely always will be because of the fact that it is an urban city, that is a party spot. It has nothing to do with being a "nanny state", if that were the case many of my fellow New Orleanians would not still be struggling right now, because "nanny" would have a bottle in our mouths.

    This is the type of thing that p*sses me off.

    Where in the world do you get off speaking on something that you don't know about?

    So basically our city is still in shambles b/c we are lazy criminals that won't do for ourselves in a lawful manner. Bull !!!...

    This Post was a lot longer ,but I think it's best that I stop here, and leave it at that.
    Last edit by FocusRN on May 8, '07
  5. by   grandee3
    Quote from Dream_Nurse
    Okay, as a New Orleanian, born and raised, I think I have something to say about this. The crime in New Orleans, is now, always has been, and sadly most likely always will be because of the fact that it is an urban city, that is a party spot. It has nothing to do with being a "nanny state", if that were the case many of my fellow New Orleanians would not still be struggling right now, because "nanny" would have a bottle in our mouths.

    This is the type o thing that p*sses me off.

    Where in the world do you get off speaking on something that you don't know about?

    So basically our city is still in shambles b/c we are lazy criminals that won't do for ourselves in a lawful manner. Bull !!!...

    This Post was a lot longer ,but I think it's best that I stop here, and leave it at that.
    Ditto, from another lifelong New Orleanian!:smiley_ab
  6. by   Nony
    I believe the post was about the shortage of nurses in New Orleans after Katrina. We waste time and space addressing issues that have no bearing on the topic that had been posted. To Jill, its a pity that you had such a bad experience in New Orleans, but this is not the way to address your frustrations by personally attacking people on the board. I have never been to New Orleans expect for a trip to the casinos and that was long before Katrina. As a houstonian, I have no problems with New Orleanians, I work with them, go to school and church with them. I cannot imagine what they have been through and are still going through after Katrina. My heart goes out to them and I would never disrespect them for the fact that I can never fully understand what it feels like to have every thing you owned and worked for taken away from you in a few hours of flooding. So please let us be civil here.
  7. by   Groo1sem
    I am currently living in New Orleans. I lived there since I was three. The gentilly area around Franklen ave to be specific. Unlike many people, I stayed during Katrina and saw a lot of nasty things. I didnt receive any help from FEMA and had to survive off of loans, but I didnt complan. I dont want to get in specifics. However, I came back two months later to my house and start the rebuilding process.. Anyways.\

    There is a HUGE shortage of nurses. I drive on the interstate to go to school and see billboards of RN's needed in hospitals. Health care this Healthcare that. Every 1/4 billboards on the interstate around New Orleans/Metaire has something to do with hospitals and nursing..

    In response to the person who had a bad experiance. Just leave. Crime is everywhere. You stick your foot in the wrong area then you are going to get stabbed. However, most of the crime is in the bad areas.
    Last edit by Groo1sem on May 8, '07
  8. by   noggin_wise
  9. by   FocusRN

    I'll keep this PG ,and not say what I really would like to say, but this LAUGHABLE !!!...


    Let's quote your first post shall we:

    I believe the crime in New Orleans is a very valid concern. New Orleans is a prime example of the devastation that the "nanny state" leaves people. People in these areas can't and won't do for themselves because the government has always done it for them. Now you see the end result.
    Now Lets quote a part of my original statement:

    The crime in New Orleans, is now, always has been, and sadly most likely always will be because of the fact that it is an urban city, that is a party spot. It has nothing to do with being a "nanny state", if that were the case many of my fellow New Orleanians would not still be struggling right now, because "nanny" would have a bottle in our mouths.
    Now do you realize or do I have to spell out the fact that, you posting this links proves no point. As a matter of fact I think I will spell it out:
    1. This post originally was about how New Orleans is still devestated, and the health care crisis.

      I never said that there was not crime in New Orleans. Nor, did I ever say that crime was not a major problem. If you look above and read for comprehension, as a matter of fact you shouldn't even try to comprehend it, because it is spelled out, as plain as day, and once again I said:
    The crime in New Orleans, is now, always has been, and sadly most likely always will be because of the fact that it is an urban city, that is a party spot. It has nothing to do with being a "nanny state", if that were the case many of my fellow New Orleanians would not still be struggling right now, because "nanny" would have a bottle in our mouths.
    Again this, is LAUGHABLE!!!...
    Last edit by FocusRN on May 9, '07 : Reason: edited out personal attack
  10. by   noggin_wise
    I bet it's not laughable to those that have been murdered and their families
    Last edit by Tweety on May 9, '07 : Reason: quoted personal attack.
  11. by   noggin_wise
    The original post was about a news article on the shortage of nurses. The article stated how crime wasn't a concern, and I beg to differ with that assessment. For a city it's size it is a murder metropolis. New Orleans and Louisiana in general are very poor areas and depend heavily on government subsisidies. Everday I see Ray Nagin on TV demanding more and more from the government. High crime and corruption are the hallmarks of New Orleans always has and always will be.
    Last edit by Tweety on May 9, '07 : Reason: quoted personal attack.
  12. by   mzkede
    [QUOTE=Dream_Nurse;2192507]Okay, as a New Orleanian, born and raised, I think I have something to say about this. The crime in New Orleans, is now, always has been, and sadly most likely always will be because of the fact that it is an urban city, that is a party spot. It has nothing to do with being a "nanny state", if that were the case many of my fellow New Orleanians would not still be struggling right now, because "nanny" would have a bottle in our mouths.

    This is the type of thing that p*sses me off.

    Where in the world do you get off speaking on something that you don't know about?

    So basically our city is still in shambles b/c we are lazy criminals that won't do for ourselves in a lawful manner. Bull !!!...

    This Post was a lot longer ,but I think it's best that I stop here, and leave it at that.[/

    THANK YOU! DITTO DITTO DITTO! BORN AND RAISED ALSO! OFCOURSE THERE'S NOOOOO CRIME ANY WHERE ELSE IN THE COUNTRY!
  13. by   cpkRN
    Just because the media decided to focus solely on the poor who were affected by the storm (and for the most part they still are) doesn't mean this is a bad place to live! There are bad places in every city! Know your way and avoid them! It's too bad the media has to continue to hurt our city by constantly focusing on the bad.

    One of the problems for us (personally - and probably for many others too) is homeowner's insurance. The only choice we had was the state program which is running us nearly $5,000/year - and that doesn't include flood which is another $900. There are few (if any) insurance companies writing policies in affected areas - making it difficult (impossible for many) to be a homeowner.

    And "nanny state?" Every state in our nation has those who need to be bottle fed and work the system - open your eyes and look around you! Again, media hype - always focusing on the negative. There are many here who need LEGITIMATE help in rebuilding - the elderly, single-parent households, hard-working lower class, etc. - are working their backsides off trying to get back to "normal."

    Don't lump everyone into one generalization. Do some real research on Katrina instead of taking everything MSNBC says as Gospel. Why don't you come down here and help instead of slinging mud from behind your computer at those of us who are proud to call New Orleans home?!?!

    Back to the topic: I can't wait to be finished with nursing school so I can help!
  14. by   grandee3
    Quote from Groo1sem
    I am currently living in New Orleans. I lived there since I was three. The gentilly area around Franklen ave to be specific. Unlike many people, I stayed during Katrina and saw a lot of nasty things. I didnt receive any help from FEMA and had to survive off of loans, but I didnt complan. I dont want to get in specifics. However, I came back two months later to my house and start the rebuilding process.. Anyways.\

    There is a HUGE shortage of nurses. I drive on the interstate to go to school and see billboards of RN's needed in hospitals. Health care this Healthcare that. Every 1/4 billboards on the interstate around New Orleans/Metaire has something to do with hospitals and nursing..

    In response to the person who had a bad experiance. Just leave. Crime is everywhere. You stick your foot in the wrong area then you are going to get stabbed. However, most of the crime is in the bad areas.
    Grew up in the same area 100 years ago, around St Raphael on Prentiss Ave. Lived in NO East when Katrina hit. Not going home. Trying to make a new home in Slidell. It's not easy, 60 yrs old. Kids and grandkids not going back to Lakeview. Have to drive 3 hrs to see them. Other family members spread out, everywhere.
    Crime? Yes, its there, it's everywhere, but there are still some safe areas. The reason I'm not rebuilding is because of the rate increase in insurance, utilities etc. I loved my little house. I have a hard time dealing with all the change. I also worked in Chalmette, the hospital is gone too. So, I've had to start over in many ways. I will not abandon my beloved city, I will do what I can to help bring NO back!
    Watching the news right now, devistation everywhere, weather will only get worse over the next few years. A tropical storm! Already? That's not good.

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