Registered Nursing Occupational Outlook: 2010-11 - page 2

Significant Points Registered nurses (RNs) constitute the largest healthcare occupation, with 2.6 million jobs. About 60 percent of RN jobs are in hospitals. The three typical educational... Read More

  1. by   NickiLaughs
    Quote from orangepink
    i understand your sentiments but if more than one person has been saying the same thing then chances are that it's true. my guess is you're about to graduate with adn or bsn right? my only advice is to be aggressive during your practicum. put yourself out there.

    to those who are still considering nursing, my advice is ----- try ot, pt, resp therapist or rad tech instead.
    i find it interesting how many new nurses are touting to go into other professions, when you on any job board for resp therapy or rad tech, they say go to nursing because there is no jobs.

    the reality is that there is no recession proof job. everyone is scrambling around trying to find the "perfect" job, and it just doesn't exist in this economy.

    and to those who spoke that they are tired of hearing that there isn't any jobs, it is regional. your area may still be hiring, but many new nurses have been unemployed for a lengthy period of time, you are going to see it on a nursing forum as long as the economy is in this rut.
  2. by   want2banurse35
    Quote from NickiLaughs
    I find it interesting how many new nurses are touting to go into other professions, when you on any job board for resp therapy or rad tech, they say go to nursing because there is no jobs.

    The reality is that there is no recession proof job. Everyone is scrambling around trying to find the "perfect" job, and it just doesn't exist in this economy.

    And to those who spoke that they are tired of hearing that there isn't any jobs, it is regional. Your area may still be hiring, but many new nurses have been unemployed for a lengthy period of time, you are going to see it on a nursing forum as long as the economy is in this rut.
    I agree with you. Rad Techs are having a hard time finding employment just like nursing and other fields
  3. by   kamaboko
    That's it. I'm passing on nursing. I'm going to med school to become a brain surgeon.
  4. by   oklahomagal
    What I am really tired of is other nursing students saying "don't get into nursing there are no jobs" While they are still pursuing their nursing degrees... :/ I guess that if you can cut down on the competition that will better your prospects of getting hired. While there may not be an abundance of jobs available especially with our economy the way it is, there will be at some point other nurses retiring and jobs coming open, maybe just not at the rate we would like. I am not going to let the nursing shortage get me down, I have dreams... big ones... I will acheive them...
    Oh and to the OP I am still pre-nursing... I have three applications in and will find out the results of getting into them by may.
    I am trying not to get to much into debt while pursuing my dream, paying what I can, pell grants and small loans... that way I dont feel the pressure to have a career as soon as I graduate. I WILL make this work!
  5. by   CNM2B201?
    I think we all just need to be prepared for NOT having a job when we graduate....if you can live with that..then go for nursing...if you MUST have a job make sure you research YOUR area right now..talk to actual nurses from YOUR area...see what the job market is like...talk to hospitals/nursing homes ect and do your homework.

    I dont need a job right when I graduate..so Im ok with the risk..others might not be and they are the ones who should know the kind of job market right now and not be fooled by the "nursing shortage" statements and advertisements they see everywhere.
  6. by   lindarn
    This article was in today's paper here in Spokane, Washington:
    Comments from anyone?

    January 24, 2011 in CityWSU associate dean says nursing can be healthy career choice
    Johnst@Spokesman.Com, (509) 459-5419 The Spokesman-Review PrintEmail

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Anne Hirsch education health health care higher education Nurses nursing Washington Center for Nursing WSU College of Nursing
    Anne Hirsch is shown in the teaching lab of the WSU College of Nursing in Spokane on Friday.

    Today's nursing school graduates continue to find good jobs even as the economy stumbles along and the uncertainty of health care reform looms. Anne Hirsch, senior associate dean of the WSU College of Nursing and a director of the Washington Center for Nursing, says the types of jobs are changing and colleges are struggling to turn out enough graduates to fill the open jobs across the state.

    Q. Are there jobs for today's nursing school graduates?

    A. Absolutely there are jobs. Recently we did a survey. ... About 80 percent of newly licensed nurses are finding a position within one year.

    Whether it (is) the exact job, location and shift they envisioned for themselves remains to be seen. Many new nurses are applying to long-term care facilities, rehabilitation facilities, and home-health centers. These are not the typical acute care jobs at hospitals that new nurses tended to gravitate toward. It's true that those jobs aren't as plentiful, especially not in Spokane right now.

    Q. Where are the jobs?

    A. Many nurses graduating from WSU are going to the West Side. It used to be that they would walk out our doors with five job offers in hand. That may not be the case anymore.

    What we tell these graduates is to take a job in nursing, to work with other nurses and continue to learn. Sometimes that's in long-term care.

    Q. What is the pay?

    A. It remains very attractive to be a nurse. The average pay can be upwards of $70,000 a year. It's easily $50,000-plus even for nurses working in long-term care.

    Q. With such good pay why does there continue to be a nursing shortage?

    A. It's a pipeline issue at universities. There are many qualified applicants who want to be nurses. We just can't take all of them. Health care is the sector where there is job growth and we attract young students and those interested in nursing as a second career.

    What's happening is that the educational institutions don't have the capacity to meet the demand. It breaks down to three problems: The first is money. It costs the state money to produce nurses. The second is clinic experiences. We have to have partnership institutions where our students can gain experience. And the last is having enough faculty.

    Q. What is, or can be done to ease the nursing shortage?

    A. We must not lose sight of the need of our four-year baccalaureate institutions to have increased capacity in this state. If we don't do something, we're not going to meet our goals of maintain the type of nursing care people have come to expect.

    At stake, frankly, is the health of people in this state and in Spokane County. That's why this is important. We have to have a longer-range view. I know it sounds corny, but it's about Washington's health.

    Q. How many students accepted into WSU's nursing school are successful?

    A. We have about 95 to 98 percent retention. We get the cream of the crop.

    Q. What needs to happen at the Legislature this year to bolster WSU's nursing school?

    A. We just need to have the resources to continue to provide excellent education at all levels.

    That includes baccalaureate program nurses, RNs coming back to school, and our masters and PhD candidates.


    Comments anyone?

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
  7. by   orangepink
    Quote from oklahomagal
    I guess that if you can cut down on the competition that will better your prospects of getting hired.
    This was never my intention. If readers feel otherwise, then I apologize. Just because I said something that you didn't want to hear doesn't mean you have to take it personally.

    Quote from oklahomagal
    While there may not be an abundance of jobs available especially with our economy the way it is, there will be at some point other nurses retiring and jobs coming open, maybe just not at the rate we would like. I am not going to let the nursing shortage get me down, I have dreams... big ones... I will acheive them...
    Oh and to the OP I am still pre-nursing... I have three applications in and will find out the results of getting into them by may.
    I am trying not to get to much into debt while pursuing my dream, paying what I can, pell grants and small loans... that way I dont feel the pressure to have a career as soon as I graduate. I WILL make this work!
    I posted my opinion so others may be more informed when making a decision. If you (and other readers) still want to pursue nursing, go ahead. Who am I to stop anyone from accomplishing their dreams? I sincerely wish you all the best.

    As for me, I'm just telling you the reality of the nursing situation. Had I known then what I knew now, I would have pursued OT. I said what I said because I didn't want other people to have the same regrets.
  8. by   mmm333
    Quote from oklahomagal
    I am so tired of hearing this. jus sayin....
    And many are tired of these articles cramming more and more people into schools, and of people lashing out at new grads for disliking it. OP made an accurate statement to the effect that the article did not mention the entry-level segment at all. Not once. People read this and think it's safe to borrow $40K for a private school's accelerated BSN program, then don't have a job a year or more after they graduate, and some of us want people to be aware of the truth.
  9. by   lindarn
    Quote from mmm333
    And many are tired of these articles cramming more and more people into schools, and of people lashing out at new grads for disliking it. OP made an accurate statement to the effect that the article did not mention the entry-level segment at all. Not once. People read this and think it's safe to borrow $40K for a private school's accelerated BSN program, then don't have a job a year or more after they graduate, and some of us want people to be aware of the truth.
    As she is making these public statements in the local paper, the want ads have been bereft of want ads for nurses Period. As she is stating that there are all these jobs- most are nursing homes.

    I am planning on E mailing the reporter who wrote this article, and include AllNurses threads as evidence. The e mail and phone number are right in the article, if anyone also wants to contact this reporter, and set them straight.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
  10. by   next1
    This article sounds like propaganda spewed by some communist regime...
  11. by   mmm333
    The Spokane article shows how easy it is to take a set of numbers and data and display it in a way that gives people a far different impression. When they say 80% find jobs within 1 year of licensure, is that over the last 10 years? 5 years? 3 years? 1 year?
    This article sets forth the premises that 1) there are a current, actual nursing shortage, 2) there are actual positions open as a result, and 3) schools need more and more funding to produce more and more grads. At some point you've got to wonder whose interest the schools are promoting- and are they acting like a business? Maybe the problem is that we don't see that the schools are businesses that want money/funding and will do whatever they have to do in that pursuit. Many problems with healthcare are based similarly on that fact that we've long regarded healthcare as a public service even after it became a commodity (as unfortunate as that may be).
  12. by   kbrn2002
    "Where are the jobs?

    A. Many nurses graduating from WSU are going to the West Side. It used to be that they would walk out our doors with five job offers in hand. That may not be the case anymore.

    What we tell these graduates is to take a job in nursing, to work with other nurses and continue to learn. Sometimes that's in long-term care.

    Q. What is the pay?

    A. It remains very attractive to be a nurse. The average pay can be upwards of $70,000 a year. It's easily $50,000-plus even for nurses working in long-term care. "

    If she means western WA [Seattle/Olympia/Tacoma] by "going to the west side" to find a job then that pay is not at all "very attractive." I looked into moving to that area a few years ago and immediately changed my mind when I found out the cost of living in that area is at least double what it is where I live, and the wages about the same.
  13. by   kamaboko
    I have to attach some bias to the article. After all, of course a school that teaches a particular program is going to say there are plenty of opportunities for graduates. They need a stream of revenue (e.g., students). Speaking confidentially, someone working at the PCC nursing program near my place told me recent grads are not finding jobs, and they are looking out-of-state with little to no success. Moreover, my friend who recruits in the medical field told me there's a glut of nurses on the market. Sure, if you want to be a BSN doing CNA work I suspect there are plenty of opportunities.

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