The Recession's Effect on Hospital Registered Nurse Employment Growth - page 3

by lperkrn

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From Nursing Economics: The Recession's Effect on Hospital Registered Nurse Employment Growth www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749072... Read More


  1. 8
    To address the age discrimination in Nursing:
    How long did it take the Nursing Profession to own up to, acknowledge(but still has not taken responsibility for) and stop living in denial that bullying was rampant amongst its profession for decades? The justification was "Oh, you just need to grow a thick skin" Nursing a profession whose core value is "do no harm",
    How long did it take the Nursing profession to acknowledge, and stop living in it's pathological state of denial over Physican Harassment(obnoxious verbal assault, physical assaults and sexual harassment). Again "do no harm"?? Was there a 'special list' of those nurses who were not to be harmed by and granted immunity from this behavior and practice and the rest of us needed to shut up because we had no rights? Were children of a lesser God? When this behavior was reported to the supervision the response was"Oh, you know how 'he'is" and said with a giggle and smirk.
    And those 2 issues were more difficult to prove.
    Ageism is against the law. It is going on, it is rampant and it is being IGNORED, again in Nursing's true pathological form- denial. Now the chants of denial are: 'it's all about the money'," not good for the employer", "low performers".
    I see alot of hypocracy in Nursing. Phrases like "Aging in place" ACE units, "the most vulnerable" Nursing can't even apply(conceptualize) these ideologies to it's own members,I think it's very apparent there is no regard for the patients and quality of life. Nursing needs to practice/live what it preaches. Nursing has become an assembly line job, with the same attachment sense as an assembly line worker. We need to stop teaching "patient needs" and start calling it "Job sitations" The infusion/infection of the business theory has obliterated the humane factor, for it's patients and it's most vulnerable nurses. We no longer have a Nurse. We have a generation of "Rosie, the Riviters"
    Last edit by kcmylorn on Nov 29, '11
    grasshopper1, brandy1017, IowaKaren, and 5 others like this.
  2. 0
    T'm not saying that there is no agism in nursing. I'm just saying that the author was not advocating for it in this article.
  3. 8
    The author was being very careful to be covert in his message. he was choosing his words very carefull and that you'd have to be pretty wide eyed naiive not to notice. There has be one thing I have been told from the time I was baby nurse- 30 years ago- I read between the lines very well. it was firstsaid to me by an ICU nurse who was tranferring a patient down to me on the oncology unit- in a round about way she was telling me the patient was being sent down toour unit to die. I know the "word dance" when I read it.
    grasshopper1, brandy1017, IowaKaren, and 5 others like this.
  4. 4
    StuderGroup - High-Middle-Low Performer Conversations


    Basically, high performers are people who bring solutions. Middle performers can identify the problem but may lack the experience or self confidence to bring solutions. Low performers tend to blame others for the problem. They act like renters instead of owners.
    Pull The Plug on Low Performers

    Has nothing to do with age but everything to do with workplace performance.Everyone needs to meet minimal workplace standards. Those that don't, need performance counseling and action plan for improvement with specific time frame. Those unable to meet expectations, need to consider other position within organization if able to meet new standards. Keeping a marginal employee on staff who's unwilling to change, only drags down morale of entire unit, along with unit performance has been my experience over the past 35yrs in healthcare.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Nov 29, '11
    llg, VickyRN, wetzoo, and 1 other like this.
  5. 7
    I agree 100% but I have to say that I have seen that "poor performance" used as the catch all to obtain the end to the desired effect. I have sat and listened over the last few years at some appalling behavior by "senior managemen" and knew that someday it would be my turn. It's disappointing but true......just my personal experience.

    I knew when I started my illness that my days were numbered as an older nurse who was too expensive to keep....both in salary and in insurance costs. Sad but true. I have seen other nurses cut inorder to improve the budget and after years of "outstanding performance" they suddenly are low performers. Anyone can pick apart and manipulate data to obtain a perdicted end. I'm not saying it's the rule but it does happen that's all...
    grasshopper1, hoopschick, IowaKaren, and 4 others like this.
  6. 5
    Using the criteria of performer cited above, I have to say- LOL, I don't think I have ever in 30 years sat in any group of complaining nurses, and note one nurse not to have an answer or a suggestion for a new managment policy, problem or solution for something they were disgruntled about.
    It's all about the politics. if you are in the managements inner circle, your speaking up and suggestions gets raves and accolades- it's like being crowned "miss america of the nursing world", and stands a very good chance of being at the very least, given a trial. If you are not in the inner circle, you are met with varying forms and degrees of criticism as to why your ideas are no good. It's a nurses political allies, opinnions and ideas that get them fired, not shutting up and keeping quiet, especially if you are an older nurse. The older nurse's ideas, solutions and suggestions are met with more disagreement and non support than a suggestion from a young nurse. I proposed in a meeting 5 days ago- that I take some of the patients away from a younger nurse(I am the oldest nurse in the group) with a heavier load, I get my work done earlier than most- I was blatanly told to 'shut up'. I was very clearly told No by my manager who said she would divy out the extra work load. Okay!! So today I sat and watched others work- I was done with mine load. I just can't buy the pure definition/critera from Suter of low performer, middle performer and high performer- It just is not carried out that way. sorry
    grasshopper1, brandy1017, IowaKaren, and 2 others like this.
  7. 1
    Thanks for sharing this article. Glad I registered for medscape too...looks like alot of good articles there.
    lindarn likes this.
  8. 6
    Low performers are those who don't suck up and play the game. Low performers are those that complain about poor and unsafe working conditions and that speak up and fight for fair working conditions. If your being a patient advocate costs the employer money you will be marked as a low performer. It's all about do more with less, its not in the budget, safe lifting equipment, working equipment. Your simply asking too much to have adequate staff and resources and working equipment to care for your patients!

    The high performers by contrast are the overachievers, martyrs who sacrifice and jump for the company and work lots of overtime at the drop of the hat. Those who don't get upset about broken equipment and being mandated because you are a nurse; therefore you are too important to go home, you must be available and willing to sacrifice for the hospital. High performers are those that want to jump thru all the hoops to climb the clinical ladder and want to spend all their free time on hospital comittees. High performers are the cheerleaders of the hospital, Rah, rah, work more for less, lets get patrioitic ie go hospital!
    libbyliberal, hoopschick, nursejoed, and 3 others like this.
  9. 6
    That is 100% correct, brandy. The lable that is pinned on the"low Performer" is troublemaker. Performance is in the 'eye of the beholder' which= management.


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