Rape victim denied morning-after pill

  1. 0 Tuesday, July 25, 2006 BY TOM BOWMAN AND DIANA FISHLOCK
    Of The Patriot-News

    LEBANON - A Good Samaritan Hospital emergency room doctor refused to give a rape victim a morning-after pill because he said it was against his Mennonite religion.
    Rebuffed by the doctor, the woman called her gynecologist, who wrote the prescription. Her local pharmacy told her it was out of the drug and referred her to a sister store in Reading.
    The former medical director of the hospital said he sees nothing strange about asking a woman from eastern Lebanon County to drive to Reading for a drug.
    "People drive to Reading to buy jeans. Even if that were the case, that you had to drive to Reading to get this [prescription], to me that does not rise to a compulsion that you have to pass laws that [doctors] have to do something," Dr. Joe Kearns said.

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  3. Visit  KScott profile page

    About KScott

    From 'Arizona'; 54 Years Old; Joined Jul '06; Posts: 132; Likes: 1.

    142 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Multicollinearity profile page
    0
    This is infuriating. If the physician objects to prescribing the medication on personal moral or ethical grounds s/he should get another physician to meet the patient's needs right then and there. I do respect the physician's right to decline. But if they do - they are obligated to get another provider right then and there to help the patient. No, rape victims should not be declined treatment and be sent driving all over creation to find someone to prescribe.
  5. Visit  PANurseRN1 profile page
    0
    I know for a fact that there is more than one physician working in the ED at the same time. It's a big ED; he could have asked another doctor to write the script.

    Perhaps he should not work in a deptartment that would cause his beliefs to conflict with his pts' needs, particularly since he is so extreme that he won't even ask a colleague in the same dept. to cover for him.
  6. Visit  MissPiggy profile page
    0
    Quote from multicollinarity
    This is infuriating. If the physician objects to prescribing the medication on personal moral or ethical grounds s/he should get another physician to meet the patient's needs right then and there. I do respect the physician's right to decline. But if they do - they are obligated to get another provider right then and there to help the patient. No, rape victims should not be declined treatment and be sent driving all over creation to find someone to prescribe.


    I agree big time, after all, who would have to raise it? Surely not the doctor, so why should he decide it? It is HER belief that should be taken into account, not his.
  7. Visit  MissPiggy profile page
    0
    Quote from multicollinarity
    This is infuriating. If the physician objects to prescribing the medication on personal moral or ethical grounds s/he should get another physician to meet the patient's needs right then and there. I do respect the physician's right to decline. But if they do - they are obligated to get another provider right then and there to help the patient. No, rape victims should not be declined treatment and be sent driving all over creation to find someone to prescribe.


    I agree big time, after all, who would have to raise it? Surely not the doctor, so why should he decide it? It is HER beliefs that should be taken into account, not his.
  8. Visit  KScott profile page
    0
    Quote from MissPiggy
    I agree big time, after all, who would have to raise it? Surely not the doctor, so why should he decide it? It is HER beliefs that should be taken into account, not his.
    I agree, as well. It seems to me this woman was victimzed twice. Once by the rapist and again by the physician who chose to inflict upon her his own religious beliefs - totally disregarding for her needs as a woman and a patient. It seems some medical professionals are finding the temptation to impose their own beliefs on a patient - beliefs regarding anything from reproductive health to euthanasia - a little too hard to resist. It is the patient's body and the patient's life.
  9. Visit  Roy Fokker profile page
    0
    Wow! I almost edited a post instead of quoting it!

    [evil]DEVIL'S ADVOCATE[/evil]

    Quote from multicollinarity
    they are obligated to get another provider right then and there to help the patient.
    I am not required to help in the facilitation of moral sin anymore than I am required to commit it.

    Quote from multicollinarity
    No, rape victims should not be declined treatment and be sent driving all over creation to find someone to prescribe.
    Isn't this just one step away from forcing Doctors to perform abortions as well? Not that it matters - contraception is just as sinful as abortion.

    Quote from KScott
    I agree, as well. It seems to me this woman was victimzed twice. Once by the rapist and again by the physician who chose to inflict upon her his own religious beliefs - totally disregarding for her needs as a woman and a patient.
    So it's ok to disregard the religious beliefs of practitioners?

    Quote from KScott
    It is the patient's body and the patient's life.
    It maybe the patients body and her life - but it's my soul. Why should I defile mine by commiting sin and cause two misfortunes instead of one? Bad enough the woman was raped - now I have to ensure than an innocent life pays the price?

    [evil]END DEVIL'S ADVOCATE[/evil]
  10. Visit  rn2binca profile page
    0
    Roy,

    I have admired many of your posts....... however, this one has me scared. Are you a nurse? A physician? I was taught in school that we must respect the choice of our patient. We DO have the right to refuse for our own personal beliefs however we are NOT allowed to push our beliefs onto a patient. Were you not taught this?

    oh and by the way ever been raped??

    Tracy, RN and patient advocate!
  11. Visit  Multicollinearity profile page
    0
    Quote from rn2binca
    Roy,

    I have admired many of your posts....... however, this one has me scared. Are you a nurse? A physician? I was taught in school that we must respect the choice of our patient. We DO have the right to refuse for our own personal beliefs however we are NOT allowed to push our beliefs onto a patient. Were you not taught this?

    oh and by the way ever been raped??

    Tracy, RN and patient advocate!
    I think he's just playing devil's advocate like he says. Or is it his new avator/pic that is scaring you? It is scaring me!
  12. Visit  Multicollinearity profile page
    0
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    I am not required to help in the facilitation of moral sin anymore than I am required to commit it.

    Isn't this just one step away from forcing Doctors to perform abortions as well? Not that it matters - contraception is just as sinful as abortion.


    [evil]END DEVIL'S ADVOCATE[/evil]
    Ok, I'll play. If you are a healthcare provider then you are required to "help in the facilitation of moral sin" to the extent of getting another healthcare provider to meet the needs of the patient. For example, let's consider Jehova's Witness nurses and refusing to hang blood on a patient because of their personal beliefs. If they do refuse they must get another practitioner to do this NOW with no harm to the patient or do it themselves. It is not the patients' problem that his/her practitioner has certain religious/moral beliefs.

    If a healthcare provider cannot or will not get another provider to provide the generally accepted treatment for a patient then they need to work in an environment that does not present such dilemmas or get out of healthcare.

    We are already showing respect for the practitioner's beliefs by allowing them to refuse. It is showing respect for the patient's legal and moral right to treatment as they choose to get another provider to provide the treatment.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Jul 25, '06
  13. Visit  KScott profile page
    0
    Quote from multicollinarity
    Ok, I'll play. If you are a healthcare provider then you are required to "help in the facilitation of moral sin" to the extent of getting another healthcare provider to meet the needs of the patient. For example, let's consider Jehova's Witness nurses and refusing to hang blood on a patient because of their personal beliefs. If they do refuse they must get another practitioner to do this NOW with no harm to the patient or do it themselves. It is not the patients' problem that his/her practitioner has certain religious/moral beliefs.

    If a healthcare provider cannot or will not get another provider to provide the generally accepted treatment for a patient then they need to work in an environment that does not present such dilemmas or get out of healthcare.

    We are already showing respect for the practitioner's beliefs by allowing them to refuse. It is showing respect for the patient's legal and moral right to treatment as they choose to get another provider to provide the treatment.
    AMEN!!
  14. Visit  pfitz1079 profile page
    0
    Despite the teachings of my church, I fully support a woman's right to choose. I will not, however, practice in any environment which would compel me to do that which I feel is immoral. Patients have the right to choose which sins they can live with and which ones they can't. I have the right to decide whether or not to participate.

    Q: Who can best decide for any nurse what practices he or she can or should live with?

    A: The State
    B: The Church
    C: The Administration
    D: The Nurse

    A: If you don't know, get out of nursing.

    Pete Fitzpatrick
    RN, CFRN, EMT-P
    Writing from the Ninth Circle
  15. Visit  steelydanfan profile page
    0
    A few things wrong with the above arguments:
    If you work in a public facility, you automatically assume the care of the public. Not the people whose beliefs you agree with, but THE PUBLIC.
    Public institutions include: ANY hospital; because they are bound by law to accept ANY EMERGENCY patient; any drugstore,because they are bound by thier state licsensure to accept any prescription legally written that has guaranted payment.
    Sorry, you do not get to interpret the law according to your own beliefs. Most hospitals will fire you if you try to limit your scope of practice to that degree. Giving a laundry lists of things you WON'T do demonstrates to management that you really are not interested in humanity, only the portion of it that agrees with your narrow viewpoint.The only way you can even HOPE to narrow your scope of practice to that extent is to become an MD and refuse to accept Federal or State insurance recipients.


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