Pt Says Anti-Abortion Staff Removed IUD Without Permission - page 9

by Cindy-san 11,890 Views | 87 Comments

Woman Says Anti-Abortion Nurse Removed IUD Without Permission, Then Lectured Her <~Entire article The article erroneously states that the practitioner is an NP. According to the New Mexico Licensing Board, she is a... Read More


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    morte~ i do not believe so, because it is obvious that this clinician was against iud's as a form of contraception.
    Cindy-san likes this.
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    I am in the "if you can't do your job, get out" camp. If i come to see you for an IUD, and you don't want anything to do with it...what is my insurance company paying you for?! This kind of thing outrages me to the point where I can't see straight! This is like a pharmacist refusing to dispense a birth control RX to me. (although this thread has been enlightening on how the different methods WORK, specifically..)

    I have had an IUD for almost 4 years. I got pregnant 2 weeks after I graduated high school, and had my baby on Medicaid. I got an IUD because I didn't know if i wanted more kids or not, but I knew then that I didn't want anymore right away. I knew I'd forget to take the birth control pill, and I'd find some way to avoid going wherever to get the shot. I needed something at least semi-permanent so I could get myself into a position where I could handle the NEXT baby(if it came), and not freak out going "how will I do this?"

    I am now in a somewhat better position than I was then, but things have changed and I think it would be irresponsible to have another kid under current circumstances. Sometimes situations aren't so simple and I wish this PA had realized that!
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    Quote from autumn_twilight
    I am in the "if you can't do your job, get out" camp. If i come to see you for an IUD, and you don't want anything to do with it...what is my insurance company paying you for?! This kind of thing outrages me to the point where I can't see straight! This is like a pharmacist refusing to dispense a birth control RX to me.
    Unfortunately, some jobs have areas that fall into moral and ethical "gray zones." I don't think it's fair to say that someone has to forego their moral and ethical beliefs just to satisfy others needs and desires. I can see how someone who is pro-life would not feel comfortable participating in IUD insertion...HOWEVER...that's where his/her rights end. He/She should have the right to say, "I'm sorry, but I don't insert IUDs," but a lecture regarding why is inappropriate. And if a patient schedules an appointment for an IUD insertion, then the patient should be scheduled with a provider who WILL insert it. Part of informed consent should include information regarding HOW the device works, but it should be presented in a neutral, nonbiased, nonjudgmental way.

    By the way--If you go to a provider for an IUD and the provider won't do it, your insurance company isn't paying the provider for an IUD insertion. If the provider did an annual exam or contraceptive counseling, that's what the provider is getting paid for.
    Cindy-san likes this.
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    Quote from cnm in progress
    Unfortunately, some jobs have areas that fall into moral and ethical "gray zones." I don't think it's fair to say that someone has to forego their moral and ethical beliefs just to satisfy others needs and desires. I can see how someone who is pro-life would not feel comfortable participating in IUD insertion...HOWEVER...that's where his/her rights end. He/She should have the right to say, "I'm sorry, but I don't insert IUDs," but a lecture regarding why is inappropriate. And if a patient schedules an appointment for an IUD insertion, then the patient should be scheduled with a provider who WILL insert it. Part of informed consent should include information regarding HOW the device works, but it should be presented in a neutral, nonbiased, nonjudgmental way.

    By the way--If you go to a provider for an IUD and the provider won't do it, your insurance company isn't paying the provider for an IUD insertion. If the provider did an annual exam or contraceptive counseling, that's what the provider is getting paid for.
    And the patient will still have to find another provider, pay 2 copays, etc. Not acceptable at all.
    Cindy-san likes this.
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    Quote from Vito Andolini
    And the patient will still have to find another provider, pay 2 copays, etc. Not acceptable at all.
    What makes someone think that their desires/needs supercede the rights of another person to say "I'm not doing something I morally or ethically oppose." Just like we can't force a patient to accept treatment that they are opposed to, patients should not be able to force providers to perform actions that they find unacceptable. It's a two-way street. The patient is free to find a provider who will provide what he/she desires. The care provider needs to be up front and make it known that they do not provide that service (for example, when the patient calls to schedule an appointment for an IUD, the receptionist should A--schedule them with someone who does perform that procedure, or B--inform that patient in a polite, non-judgmental way that this provider does not perform that procedure). If the provider does not insert IUDs and somehow the patient was scheduled with her, then she should offer to have another provider in the office see the patient.

    Part of the onus is on the patient to ensure that they are scheduling an appointment with an appropriate provider. Do some research...don't just flip to the yellow pages and choose the first OB/GYN office that you see, or the one with the biggest ad...consumer education goes a long way.
    Cindy-san and NurseyBaby'05 like this.
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    Quote from cnm in progress
    Unfortunately, some jobs have areas that fall into moral and ethical "gray zones." I don't think it's fair to say that someone has to forego their moral and ethical beliefs just to satisfy others needs and desires. I can see how someone who is pro-life would not feel comfortable participating in IUD insertion...HOWEVER...that's where his/her rights end. He/She should have the right to say, "I'm sorry, but I don't insert IUDs," but a lecture regarding why is inappropriate. And if a patient schedules an appointment for an IUD insertion, then the patient should be scheduled with a provider who WILL insert it. Part of informed consent should include information regarding HOW the device works, but it should be presented in a neutral, nonbiased, nonjudgmental way.

    By the way--If you go to a provider for an IUD and the provider won't do it, your insurance company isn't paying the provider for an IUD insertion. If the provider did an annual exam or contraceptive counseling, that's what the provider is getting paid for.
    In the mid '60s there were pharmacists refusing to dispense birth control pills! I worked with "unwed" expectant mothers in a Maternity Home at that time, and 80% relinquished their babies for adoption. A decade or so later, when public acceptance of birth control pills (and more and more Catholic women needed regulation of their menstrual periods) was established, roughly 80% of "single mothers" kept their babies. To me, that exemplifies the power of intention. Post partum stays at that Maternity Home became longer, and babies were then allowed to be there with their mothers (before that, they went to foster homes). That allowed supervised parenting skills to be taught, and occupational retraining commenced for the mothers. :redpinkhe
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    Quote from Vito Andolini
    And the patient will still have to find another provider, pay 2 copays, etc. Not acceptable at all.
    Forgot to add earlier:

    If the patient spends time upfront finding the right provider, then they will NOT have 2 visits, 2 copays, etc... If I go to the dermatologist and expect to get treatment for a UTI, it isn't going to happen because I chose the wrong provider. Sure, he's an MD. Sure, he's capable of sending a urine culture & giving me a Rx. But he won't do it. It would be my own fault because I didn't choose my MD appropriately.

    If the patient comes in for an annual and says, "Oh, by the way, I'd like an IUD put in," she wouldn't have left the office with one that day anyway. She still would've needed another appointment. So what if she's told, "You'll have to make that appointment with someone else, because I don't insert IUDs."

    If she made the appointment specifically for an IUD insertion and was scheduled with a provider who doesn't do them, THEN the fault is on the provider and he/she should assist the patient by rescheduling with no additional fees or having someone else in the office see the patient that day.

    It only becomes unacceptable if the provider tries to inflict his/her values and beliefs on the patient or acts in a judgmental, condescending manner.
    Cindy-san and lamazeteacher like this.
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    Quote from lamazeteacher
    In the mid '60s there were pharmacists refusing to dispense birth control pills!
    Forget the mid-sixties: There are doctors and pharmacists in the mid 2000's doing the same!
    Cindy-san and lamazeteacher like this.


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