Prison nurse suspended in 'exorcism' investigation - page 2

An investigation is under way into claims that a nurse at a Northumberland young offenders' institution performed an exorcism on an inmate. The Prison Service confirmed that a nurse at HMP... Read More

  1. by   pisceanbabe74
    [quote=balutpinoysabutuan]WHAT IS SHE THINKING?[/quote ,


    Waaaaa, I think I should have the latest nursing book that has exorcism in it.
  2. by   azhiker96
    They don't have exocism in my nursing program. It's a pity. I had a pt in clinicals last week who could have benefitted. The haldol sure wasn't working for him.
  3. by   BORI-BSNRN
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Quick, who's crazier: the dude who thinks he's possessed, or the nurse who went so far as to "perform" an exorcism?!?

    I'm gonna have to be paid way more to to beat the devil (literally) out of my patients!!
    :roll :chuckle
  4. by   TrudyRN
    Call me "awful" but I think the nurse might not have been in error.
    If you think there is no demon possession or demonic activity and influence in this world, particularly in a prison filled with people who have done some truly awful things, please reconsider.

    She should have done it quietly and not publicized it, though, being as how so many people don't believe in the devil or demons or the power of God. Too bad she thought she could be open about it. I hope it all works out favorably for all concerned.
  5. by   BabyNurseLPN
    It wasn't such a great idea for the nurse to tell people what she did.
    I understand it's out of our scope of practice. And, that is more of a job for clergy...

    But, isn't it funny how we hear about something as simple as an exorcism in the news, but not the far more aweful things that go on in prisons. We all know about them, it's a joke on t.v all the time.. With lines like " I don't want to go to jail, I'm too pretty.." And it's a man saying that! Yet the media is concerned with nurses and exorcisms.

    Odd thing, exorcising demons on the job... I'm guessing she had good intentions?
  6. by   RNsRWe
    ok, for Trudy and Baby: remember this isn't about whether a nurse did her job poorly, or whether or not anyone believes in God, the devil, or the power of exorcism. It's about whether it's reasonable for a nurse to perform an exorcism on a resident juvenile criminal offender in a prison facility....and it most certainly is NOT.

    If she felt that this fella was in need of exorcism, (going with this for the moment), then I'm pretty darned sure there was clergy available at this facility with whom she could speak. Real, professional, trained, devil-beatin' clergy. Or clergy who knew where they could get someone like that IF THE GUY qualified. My understanding of that process is you practically need permission from the Pope himself, but them's the rules.

    I might, as a nurse, feel that a patient could benefit from a hefty dose of Ativan. My job, however, is to broach the subject with the DOCTOR, not administer the treatment myself. Not qualified. She shouldn't have "done it quietly and not publicized it"....for goodness' sake, how's that different from me quietly slipping Ativan to the same guy because I think I know what's best for him?

    That nurse also was doing herself and the patient a ridiculous injustice by giving in to her own desire to "save" this patient herself.
    Last edit by RNsRWe on Sep 24, '06
  7. by   Cheyenne RN,BSHS
    call me "awful" but i think the nurse might not have been in error.

    [font="georgia"]i agree with trudy. there is a fine line between the things in the world and the things that are in the spiritual realms. one's personal spiritual beliefs have no place in nursing performance per se.

    now before everyone freaks, i am not saying that there is no place for one's private spiritual beliefs or prayer or whatever. i am saying that we are to practice nursing in a professional way and contacting the appropriate clergy would have been a wiser choice to me.

    i have known nurses who practice wicca and satanism and voodoo as well as those who are fundamental christians, those who practice shamanism, and those who are absolute atheists.

    i just do not think we should cross the line and perform tasks not exactly within our scope of practice.

  8. by   RNsRWe
    Fire Wolf: based on what you wrote, you are actually NOT in agreement with Trudy's quoted comment. She felt the nurse "might not have been in error", but the nurse's error in question wasn't her belief that the kid might have been possessed, but rather that she acted as an exorcist and not as a nurse!

    I might believe a nasty patient needs a "time-out" but I sure as heck can't place him in the corner on a stool. I might believe that a patient is sharing bodies with the spirit of Ted Bundy, but I sure can't grab a bible and start attempts to exorcise him. The mistake wasn't in her belief in HIS belief of possession.

    But I'm now liking the idea of writing "time outs" into a certain patient's care plan....hmmm....
  9. by   Cheyenne RN,BSHS
    fire wolf: based on what you wrote, you are actually not in agreement with trudy's quoted comment. she felt the nurse "might not have been in error", but the nurse's error in question wasn't her belief that the kid might have been possessed, but rather that she acted as an exorcist and not as a nurse!

    [font="comic sans ms"]lol, you are right.
  10. by   BabyRN2Be
    I'm just wondering whose idea was it? Was it the nurse's? Or did the pt say, "I think I'm possessed by the devil and need an exorcism. Would you do it? And say, fluff my pillow when you're done."

    I'm half joking there. If it was suggested by a psych pt, I don't think it was a good idea to play into the patient's delusions. Of course, I know, demon possession is real, but not within the nurse's scope of practice.
  11. by   supernurse65
    Quote from BabyRN2Be
    I'm just wondering whose idea was it? Was it the nurse's? Or did the pt say, "I think I'm possessed by the devil and need an exorcism. Would you do it? And say, fluff my pillow when you're done."

    I'm half joking there. If it was suggested by a psych pt, I don't think it was a good idea to play into the patient's delusions. Of course, I know, demon possession is real, but not within the nurse's scope of practice.


    And IF it was a psych patient, especially a schizophrenic, whey didn't she call the psychiatrist or the doc on call to give Risperdal or Seroquel or something to assist with auditory hallucinations. Visual hallucinations are of an organic matter.
  12. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from supernurse65
    And IF it was a psych patient, especially a schizophrenic, whey didn't she call the psychiatrist or the doc on call to give Risperdal or Seroquel or something to assist with auditory hallucinations. Visual hallucinations are of an organic matter.
    Ah, my guess would be because of something it said in the article: she'd DONE THIS BEFORE. Whose idea it was? Well, if it was the nurse's, I wonder if she'd have benefitted from some of that Seroquel herself.....

    Sigh.

    I still say I don't get paid enough for that gig.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    how bizarre!

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