President Proposes Increased Funding for Nurse Loan Repayment & Scholarship Programs - page 2

AACN Applauds the President's FY 2010 Budget Request President Proposes to Increase Funding for Nurse Loan Repayment and Scholarship Programs from $37 Million to $125 Million WASHINGTON, DC, May 7, 2009 - Today,... Read More

  1. 1
    Something wrong with this picture, Guys NO NURSING SHORTAGE exists and I think it never existed. It is the hospitals BS to load nurses with more patients. I'm new grad I get job in a crappy hospital after months of job hunting. Half of my classmate still waiting for job. In my area, most the hospitals are in hiring freeze. I think that the governments should set a safe nurse-patient ratio and favorable working environment fisrt then assess if there is shortage. Nurses need to have avoice. If there is shortage or not it should be us in bedside to decide if we need more nurses or not. Not someone with his pijama in his bedroom. Please stop repeating what the hospitals lobbies and media are saying. we should clean up the mess first. "better pay and good working environment" is the priority right now.
    LockportRN likes this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 0
    WRONG, WRONG, WRONG, WRONG, WRONG!!! I've said it before and I'll say it again. The problem is not in the mass production of nurses, it is in the mass retention of nurses. Mark my words Mr. President, if you spend $125,000,000 to train 1,000,000 nurses and at the end of the day 1,000,000 nurses quit their jobs YOU HAVE DONE NOTHING BUT WASTE MONEY!!! I tip my hat to our president and find him to be one of the smartest people in our great country, but this reeks of political calculation at a time where much good might be accomplished.
  3. 0
    Isn't it possible that there is both a nursing shortage AND that many nurses (new grads especially) can't get hired? Nurse staffing seems to be a big problem, as it affects both patient care and retention of nurses. This is a problem that will need to be addressed from many different angles, this being one of them. Another would be mandating nurse to patient ratios. Just because this won't solve every problem doesn't mean it's a cynical political calculation. I have faith in our president, but also in nurses to keep telling him what's what. Yeah, we need more nurses, and we need better retention, and we need better nurse to patient ratios, and we need universal healthcare, and we need better incentives for nurses to become faculty.... this addresses some of those goals.
  4. 1
    There should be programs that allow individuals to pay for their education ie. masters in nursing if they make a commitment to be an instructor for x number of years...I agree, we need more instructors but need to pay them comprable salaries.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  5. 2
    Quote from HonestRN
    I think the idea is great however it appears that there is no nursing shortage. Tons of new grads are posting how they can't get jobs. Perhaps a better approach would be to make nursing a more attractive profession with better working conditions.
    Nurses will continue to leave bed side nursing until changes are made in the staff to pt ratio !A bed side nurse is not able to practise nursing the way we are taught is prudent .As nurses we need to come together and make our voices heard on this to the public and our government.
    aklgap and tulip928 like this.
  6. 0
    Is there anyone here who can speak authoritatively as to the working conditions of nurses overseas, specifically: average pay per hour, hours per week, RN/pt ratios, hours spent documenting daily, and litigation. And perhaps current shortages?
  7. 6
    Rather than increase funding for loan repayment and scholarship programs, I think it would be more effective to provide funding to hospitals to subsidize the cost of training new graduates.

    From the new-grad trenches, there's no shortage of newly minted nurses rolling off the lines every semester. There is, however, a dearth of positions for them step into because the hospitals don't want to spend the time and money to train the new grads. Nearly every job I come across requires experience. Where are all those experienced nurses to come from if we don't let the new grads in the door? Oh yeah, I remember... offshore.

    The problem, Mr. President, is not a lack of training facilities nor a lack of their graduates... the problem is the scarcity of jobs into which those graduates might enter.
  8. 0
    Quote from stephenfnielsen
    Is there anyone here who can speak authoritatively as to the working conditions of nurses overseas, specifically: average pay per hour, hours per week, RN/pt ratios, hours spent documenting daily, and litigation. And perhaps current shortages?
    By "overseas" do you mean England... or China? The Philippines or Australia? India or France?

    "Overseas" is a very, very diverse place...
  9. 0
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    By "overseas" do you mean England... or China? The Philippines or Australia? India or France?

    "Overseas" is a very, very diverse place...
    Hmmm. How about this: any country that trains and uses nurses in a similar fashion to the USA. So Canada and England I would imagine off the top of my head would work. The truth is I really have very little knowledge about nursing outside of the USA and wonder what other countries might teach us.

    As far as focusing on new-grads, I couldn't agree more.
  10. 0
    Quote from mcpdxrn
    There should be programs that allow individuals to pay for their education ie. masters in nursing if they make a commitment to be an instructor for x number of years...I agree, we need more instructors but need to pay them comprable salaries.
    There was a program just like that in Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, it was discontinued last year...


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top