Pilots offer stress talks to nurses

  1. American fighter pilots could soon be training NHS nurses to deal with stressful situations and reduce mistakes.

    The pilots have already trained US medical staff on how to deal with stress and improve teamwork.

    Nursing Standard magazine says the company LifeWings Partners, set up by ex-fighter pilots, is in talks with several NHS trusts with a view to bringing the training programme to the UK.

    Vanderbilt University Medical Centre in Memphis managed to reduce the number of treatment errors and increase its retention rate for nurses by over 30% after using the training to improve communication between nurses and doctors in an intensive care unit.

    more: http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=12612006
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   donmurray
    A few thoughts on the topic.

    Will this programme just be for the high flyers in nursing?

    Will it use grounded theory?

    Will it be run on a wing and a prayer?

    Or will it be all airy fairy?
  4. by   pugmum
    Quote from donmurray
    A few thoughts on the topic.

    Will this programme just be for the high flyers in nursing?

    Will it use grounded theory?

    Will it be run on a wing and a prayer?

    Or will it be all airy fairy?
    OMG...too funny!
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    DON welcome back!!!!!!
  6. by   hipab4hands
    Just a thought.
    I wonder when was the last time a pilot was verbally abused by a physician in front of co workers? Or the pilot had to page a doc, who refused to answer, then was berated for "disturbing" the doc?
  7. by   Judee Smudee
    In the USA pilots are experiencing a decline in wages and benefits and professional status. Indeed many are experiencing unemployment. Maybe nurses should be talking to them about how to continue to meet professional responsibilities under those circumstances.
  8. by   Jerico
    Quote from Judee Smudee
    In the USA pilots are experiencing a decline in wages and benefits and professional status. Indeed many are experiencing unemployment. Maybe nurses should be talking to them about how to continue to meet professional responsibilities under those circumstances.
    A PILOT teaching nurses about STRESS????


    Someone very close to me is a pilot.

    Surely they jest!
  9. by   LoneStar1908
    Judee, You are sooooooooo right. I'm currently a flight attendant and a lot of pilots are very streessed out at my airline. I don't want to go into how much they cry and complain .
  10. by   bluestar
    When a pilot flies he can engage autopilot, yet we as nurses cannot.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I just think the stresses are so different, that it would be hard for pilots (particularly FIGHTER PILOTS) and nurses to relate on a similar level. I worked with and around enough of them in the USAF, many were stuck-up primadonnas that just "KNEW" the world revolved around them. Civilain pilots may differ, but that is my frame of reference here. Seems pilots and doctors would much more relate here, JMO.
  12. by   sanctuary
    facinating. pilots must be arrogant, or must really be able to teach anything to anybody. what a pile!!!
    my late brother was an air force pilot. he was a bit high on himself, but never tried to tell me, or his wife (another nurse) how to manage anything.
  13. by   MayisontheWay
    I wonder how many of you read the article before jumping on the bandwagon to bash the pilots. Afterall, what do they know about stress?

    Think about what the conversation in the cockpit must be like just before they drop a bomb on a target called in by soldiers on the ground. If the soldiers on the ground can see the target...think about how close they are to it. Now think about how precise that bomb from above needs to be. I'd say that's about as stressful as it gets. I think learning the tactics they use to communicate with one another to avoid confusion would be extremely value in times of crisis.

    I doubt Vanderbilt would just willy-nilly let these guys train doctors/nurses in the art of high-stress communication unless they thought it was a problem in the first place.

    I think the training is not about how they communicate with each on the ground, rather in the air under very stressful circumstances....

    May
  14. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Ok I am sorry, but I saw and heard what I did among fighter pilots. SURELY a measure of arrogance is needed in their job to be able to function. It's a lot like arrogance in very experienced and good neuro-surgeons, say. It goes w/the territory in such a stressful and difficult job!

    I really just think the stresses we must manage as nurses are very different and it would be hard for them to relate to OURS.

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