Pandemic Flu - Thread II - page 15

Frist calls for a Manhatten Project: We are so..., you know. He is telling it like it is. Does anyone really understand this? There is nothing that we can do but prepare, but no one is... Read More

  1. by   gr8greens
    Being a novice at following the course of pandemic and/or avian flu.....seems to me that the people who should be in the know.....haven't really got a clue. WHO doesn't communicate with the CDC.....health authorities in other countries don't communicate with WHO or CDC. How can any viable plan ever be implemented?
  2. by   indigo girl
    CIDRAP - Pandemic Triage Plan Addresses Tough Ventilator Decisions:
    CIDRAP >> Pandemic triage plan addresses tough ventilator decisions

    Commentary from Recombinomics on more human polymorphisms found in sequences from Azerbaijan:
    N186S and Q196R In Iraq H5N1 Patients
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 2, '06
  3. by   indigo girl
    Spitzer, your plan comes at a bad time. Do you really want to do away with
    those beds now?
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f195/plan-could-close-
    20-more-new-york-hospitals-192486.html


    http://www.health.state.ny.us/
    diseases/communicable/influenza/pandemic/docs/pandemic_influenza_plan.pdf


    Quote from [URL="http://www.health.state.ny.us/diseases/communicable/influenza/
    pandemic/docs/pandemic_influenza_plan.pdf"
    http://www.health.state.ny.us/
    diseases/communicable/influenza/pandemic/docs/pandemic_influenza_plan.pdf[/URL]
    A pandemic will overwhelm the current healthcare system. The increase in patients
    requiring hospitalization and critical care will result in shortages of multiple resources
    including personnel and equipment. This will in turn create a situation where nursing
    homes and homecare agencies will be required to accept more clinically complex hospital
    discharges and will have to care for patients they would normally discharge to the hospital.
    New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) will need to authorize
    hospitals, adult care facilities and nursing homes to expand their capacity by utilizing
    common areas that would not normally be approved for use. Community Health Centers
    and other primary care providers will need to expand their triage and outpatient treatment
    capacityto relieve pressure from hospital emergency departments. All facilities will need
    to supplement their highly trained professional staff with volunteers and lesser trained staff.
    Do they really expect nursing homes and home health in NY to pick up the slack? How
    is this going to happen?
    They have acknowledged that 50% of the staff will not be working.
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 2, '06
  4. by   indigo girl
    More H5N1 Match Failures in Indonesia - Commentary from Recombinomics:

    More H5N1 Match Failures in Indonesia


    Quote from www.recombinomics.com/News/12020602/H5N1_Indonesia_Match_Not_2.html
    H5N1 sequences from the two most recent confirmed cases in Indonesia were released
    today... Although the WHO update indicated poultry had died in the Karawang
    neighborhood, the sequences from the two patient failed to match H5N1 from poultry.

    ... the only Java match with the H5N1 human sequences has been a cat isolate from
    Indramayu. Media reports have suggested additional H5N1 positive cats have been
    identified, but no sequences have been published other than the one cat sequence
    described above...
    So, can anyone explain why the human sequences do not match the poultry sequences
    if the people are catching this from their chickens?
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 2, '06
  5. by   LMonty911
    hmmmm- they arent catching it from their chickens? That means maybe another mammalian reservoir?
  6. by   indigo girl
    Quote from LMonty911
    hmmmm- they arent catching it from their chickens? That means maybe another mammalian reservoir?
    Why do you say mammal? I think so too, BTW.
  7. by   indigo girl
    CIDRAP - HHS Issues Planning Guide for Mass Casualty Events:
    http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/bt/
    bioprep/news/nov2006casualties.html



    Quote from http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/bt/
    bioprep/news/nov2006casualties.html
    A centerpiece of the report is a case study on pandemic influenza...the
    authors suggest a "bed czar" be appointed to monitor the supply of
    hospital beds and equipment and make assignments based on availability.
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 2, '06
  8. by   indigo girl
    Here is an amazing little piece (hat tip to CurEvents.com and solitaire)
    from Great Britain concerning their just in time delivery system:
    House of Lords - Science and Technology - Minutes of
    Evidence
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 3, '06
  9. by   indigo girl
    My sister-in-law is the human resources director in a large nursing home/
    assisted living facility, where they are quietly ordering material for body bags
    and having them sent out to be sewn. Who knew? I was shocked!

    (The following links hat tip to Flutrackers)
    From Minnesota Dept of Health - Care of Deceased Bodies
    in Event of Pandemic:
    http://
    216.109.125.130/search/cache?p=&fr=yq-read&ei=UTF-8&type=03708&u=www.health.state.mn.us/
    divs/idepc/diseases/flu/pandemic/plan/faqd


    Australia:
    http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/public-health/
    ehb/general/funeral/pdf/influenza_pan.pdf


    San Mateo, California:
    http://www.smhealth.org/vgn/images/p...section_14.pdf
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 3, '06
  10. by   indigo girl
  11. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from indigo girl
    My sister-in-law is the human resources director in a large nursing home/
    assisted living facility, they are quietly ordering material for body bags
    and having them sent out to be sewn. Who knew? I was shocked!
    Dang girl, you sure do know how to scare a nurse! But seriously, the implications in nursing homes ALONE are staggering to the mind. My grandfather was a 1912 era influenza victim, he survived but contracted enchephalitis as a seconary infection and was brain damaged for the rest of his life, family stories still tell the tale of how profoundly my family was impacted by this.I understand that ,that 1912 or was it 1918, influenza was also a type of "bird" flu.
  12. by   indigo girl
    Quote from ingelein
    Dang girl, you sure do know how to scare a nurse! But seriously, the implications in nursing homes ALONE are staggering to the mind. My grandfather was a 1912 era influenza victim, he survived but contracted enchephalitis as a seconary infection and was brain damaged for the rest of his life, family stories still tell the tale of how profoundly my family was impacted by this.I understand that ,that 1912 or was it 1918, influenza was also a type of "bird" flu.
    Ingelein, yes , it is a little mind blowing. I did not know that my sister-in-law even knew anything about avian flu. You could have knocked me over when she told me about the body bags and the huge space that they decided would have to be used as a morgue!

    That video that L.Monty posted above does a nice job of explaining the relationship of H5N1 (the current concern) and contrasting it with H1N1
    (the 1918 or Spanish Flu). It is correct to say both were avian in origin.
    What got my attention in the video was the outbreak in 1916 of H1N1 which was just researched, indicated that small numbers died prior to the millions who died just two years later. See any parallels?
  13. by   LMonty911
    whay did I say mammalian?

    because the info I've been reading indicates the receptor sites on the virus seem to be more mammalian friendly than avian- if it was hiding in an avian population, we would expect those receptor sites (portions of the genes) to have the gene sequences that are more specific for birds.

    that means its very possible that there is a mammalian reservoir.

    BTW, I'd bet my next paycheck that Indigo Girl, like me, doesnt want to scare anybody. But, I'd also lay the same bet that we hope that y'all get concerned enough to research some more to see how this will affect you and your families and the places you work.

    Why? Heck, I'm a nurse, I care about my fellow nurses as well as my patients. I dont want us to be blindsided. We need to know in advance so we can prepare, metally, physically and spirtually for what may be a 2-3 year long global disaster if this thing hits with a CFR anything like 1918 or worse.

    I truly and honestly believe in my heart that the only way we can mitigate the effects is thru personal and organizational and local goverment preparation.

    The cavalry already said they wont be coming! If your local electricity goes off- nobody is going to come help get it back up, 'cause everyone is going to be in the same boat. If your water treatment plant can't function because they cant get chlorine- there isnt going to be extra laying around. And if the grocery store shelves empty, or the pharmacy shelves empty- there wont be trucks from FEMA driving into town to replace that.

    HHS Secretary Levitt has visited evry US state and told them that clearly and unequivocally. "You are on your own". Why have so few of us (the whole ppulation, not just nurses!) gotten the message? I dont understand that, really, I wish someone could explain that.

    Why do so few people take this threat seriously? I wish anyone who can would share their thoughts on that. It would really help me to learn more.

    I cant help but get the point- we are all on own own- our facilites and our communites and our families. Those that havnet prepared may suffer if the just in time stocking system fails. If up to 40-50% (goverment figures) of workers (like truck drivers and other esssential service workers) are off work at any one time for weeks because of illness or fear of illness- then how can the system hold without failures and shortages?

    Theres a lot to think of. We cant do much for our families and the patients that depend on us if we havent prepared and we end up victims too, of either the virus or the social issues that a pandemic creates.

    My best hope is that we start asking questions and find out how prepared we in HC are, and encourage preparation of those facilites that are behind-way too many of them are right now. That would be a huge contribution that nurses could make. That, and being personally prepared-if for no other reason than because the less we need, the more will be available for those truly in need who couldn't or wouldn't prepare.

    And the last minute isnt the time to start. By then, when the public does wake up, the supply system will be too strained to cover demand. Thats known from other issues, like hurricane preparations. Trying to get a month or more of food. meds and supplies then makes up part of the problem. Another bonus- Getting prepped for bird flu makes us more resiliant for any crisis that may come our way- hurricane, earthquake, terrorist attack, tornado etc.

    Yea, I care.
    Last edit by LMonty911 on Dec 3, '06

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