Outdated culture blamed for male nurse shortage - page 4

Outdated culture blamed for male nurse shortage Friday, July 16, 2004. 8:08am A nursing academic has blamed an outdated culture for the huge shortage of men in the nursing profession. Kim... Read More

  1. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from MLOS

    As far as pay, in my area of the country typical new RN grad salaries are $35-40K. This is not out of line with the pay for new college grads starting out in many other fields. I'm not claiming it's great money, because it's not, I'm just saying it's comparable to starting salaries in other fields.
    The troubling thing about nursing is that starting salaries - yeah, they're great comparatively, but what about salaries for folks with 5-7 years experience? 8-10 years experience? 25+ years experience?

    The salaries for experienced nurses SUCK - plain and simple

    Any other profession - sure, you start out making peanuts, but once you have established yourself in your field, you demand higher income because you know what you're doing - you've been there and done that, and that is valued in many other fields. NOT NURSING, though. As far as administration is concerned, a new grad is worth just as much as an experienced nurse. Of course these are the same fools that think NICU nurses and CVICU nurses and adult M/S nurses are interchangable at the drop of a hat. The profession does not receive the respect it deserves. Very few people, male or female, are willing to be disrespected the way nurses are. That, my friends, is why there is a nursing shortage right now. It is also the reason that we may not come out of this cycle of the shortage as quickly or completely as shortages past. People who turn to nursing for job security and "good money" are the most likely to leave when they find themselves treated like animals (some animals are treated better than some nurses). You can work at UPS for just a little less money, union support, and a lot less s*** to put up with - both figuratively and literally.
  2. by   Gromit
    Quote from stsdoc
    <~nipped to save space~>
    Women step up, men are not willing to "step down" to fill the void.
    Well, I cannot speak for you, but as far as I'm concerned, I don't view becoming a nurse as akin to "stepping down". Sure, in some respects, I cannot do things I did as a paramedic, but as a paramedic, I was stuck in a dead-end job -irtually no advancement opportunities -the county personnel that constituted my colleagues as well as my superiors, were about the same age as myself -the meaning? I'd be doing the same exact job (working in the back of a meatwagon), very probably for my entire career. AND I'd have topped-out salarywise, after less than half of that career. No thanks.
    As an RN, however, I also get to do things that I'd never get to do as a 'medic. Not too many medics get to work with ventilators (and I'm not talking about those little boxes with a rate and volume dial that hook to the oxygen tank and take the place of an ambu-bag), or arterial lines, perform complex dressing changes, or actually get to help a patient get better, and watch them progress over the course of their stay (or be there for their final moments -nobody should die alone). While I was with quite a few that died as a medic, our general attitude was "once the ambulance doors close, its someone elses' problem!".
    Nursing has quite a few opportunities to offer up, if you want to learn. In MOST ways, I see it as a vast improvement (a step up, if you will) to my career as a paramedic/firefighter. Like any job, it has its down sides as well, but now my schedule is far more flexible, I enjoy my time off, and work in better conditions (for the most part).
    For the people who like to work with "toys", there are a LOT of them. For the people who want to feel like they made a difference, well, as with either job, thats up to YOU to decide. Nursing can be very thankless, but so can being an emt, or paramedic. MOST patients who call "911" are not true emergencies -they literally want a ride to the hospital. Most of the time, I felt like a glorified taxicab (expensive one, but still) -the only time I ever heard "thanks" was typically when I treated someone with hypoglycemia with D-50. Imagine.
    If having people be greatful is the idea, then the medical field in general is the wrong place to be.
    You say its a step down for a man (of which I am, thank you) to become a nurse?
    I'm glad I don't have YOUR perception on the way of things.
  3. by   Gromit
    I did forget to add:
    I'm proud to be called Nurse. I don't care (never did, in ANY field, or according to my late mother, I didn't, even as a child) what the opinions of others are, regarding myself and what I choose.
    Much of Nursing is feminine-oriented (even the Icons on this BBS show the nurse as a female with a nurse-cap). Well, its up to US to change the perception, if we really want to.
    Put a moustache or beard on that lady with a cap -hehehe. Whatever.
    Respect from others is nice. But what REALLY counts is wheather or not you have respect FOR YOURSELF.
  4. by   Corrections RN
    Right on resqrider. It's not the profession, it is a stereotype. I too am male and an RN and proud of it.
  5. by   ATB
    My son just started his pre-nursing studies at our state university----and I hope he makes it through the stereotype issues you've written about. I am not a nurse but found your web site valuable as a parent....especially of a male nursing student. Incidently, I had a nurse (of the male gender) in l & d years back and, a female OB. Now how's that for a swap a roo? !! I tell my son that nothing worth having comes easy, and perhaps this reverse discrimination will erase itself with conversations such as these.
    PS---I officiate men's sports as a female----I understand the struggle! Thanks
  6. by   Gromit
    Quote from ATB
    My son just started his pre-nursing studies at our state university----and I hope he makes it through the stereotype issues you've written about. I am not a nurse but found your web site valuable as a parent....especially of a male nursing student. Incidently, I had a nurse (of the male gender) in l & d years back and, a female OB. Now how's that for a swap a roo? !! I tell my son that nothing worth having comes easy, and perhaps this reverse discrimination will erase itself with conversations such as these.
    PS---I officiate men's sports as a female----I understand the struggle! Thanks
    Try not to worry. By and large, he shouldnt have any trouble from the stereotype thing at the school -minimal if any. I had only a minor problem or two (mostly from a couple of preceptors who just didn't like males getting into their profession -but even these were professional enough not to cause any real problems -it was in their body language and some of the phrases they used that made it obvious how they felt, but academically, it didn't interfere (and while I have a fairly thick skin, I'm sensitive to injustice and have a difficult time not answering the call, if you get my drift -hehe). Seriously, just tell him to be himself, and overall he should be far too busy studying and doing clinicals for anyone to give him any grief.
    As all things in life, it will be a learning experience in more ways than one, and if my experience as an adult returning to school was any indication, he should have fun. I enjoyed pretty much all of my program -its stressful, but like most people in the healthcare field, I kind of feed on stress (my wife would be testament to that).
  7. by   ATB
    Thanks Gromit for the words of wisdom. I'll pass it on to my son and keep nudging him to hold his ground, take the good and leave the rest.
  8. by   danu3
    www
    Quote from ATB
    My son just started his pre-nursing studies at our state university----and I hope he makes it through the stereotype issues you've written about. I am not a nurse but found your web site valuable as a parent....especially of a male nursing student. Incidently, I had a nurse (of the male gender) in l & d years back and, a female OB. Now how's that for a swap a roo? !! I tell my son that nothing worth having comes easy, and perhaps this reverse discrimination will erase itself with conversations such as these.
    PS---I officiate men's sports as a female----I understand the struggle! Thanks
    If your son has not seen this already, take a look at http://www.discovernursing.com

    Look at the "profiles", there are over a hundred profiles, lots of them are men. I personally have read about a hundred of them since they are very interesting and it shows the diversity and the many opportunities within nursing.

    -Dan
  9. by   ATB
    Hey Dan---thanks for the web site and "profiles". I read them myself and will forward the info on to my son. Anything to keep them motivated is money well spent! ATB

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