OSHA Fines Hospital for Failing to Provide a Safe Workplace - page 3

Federal investigation finds safety violations at The Acadia Hospital ... Read More

  1. Visit  Pfiesty profile page
    1
    cdsga: I have called OSHA a few times about very specific violations and they did not even check them out. The problem is that most of the OSHA personnel are generalists or specialists in construction and other non-health care industry injuries. Fo the most part, they don't even understand healthcare risks. I don't think any of them have ever heard of "bloodborne pathogen" and think that violence is not violence if it is a sick patient doing it. At least that is what I have found from the Atlanta regional (SE USA) offices.
    nurse0520 likes this.
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  3. Visit  pbilbrey profile page
    1
    I have had to see pts in 4 point restraints exp when in heavy DTs. It is not just to make the nurse's job easier it is for the safety of the pt. I have heard so many times they just tie him down so don't have to fool with him. That is so not true. It is really hard to blame the pt when he/she is mentally checked out.

    Hardest I have ever been hit was by this little old lady no bigger than 80lbs. It idle me for a second. After that I learned to duck really fast. I have had big muscle men swing at me when broke loose from restraints or when go to suction them.

    Restraints are very much needed work place safetyitem for the pt and for the nurse. Prevents pulling out of lines, ET tubes, drains if pull wrong out can bleed to death really quick.
    herring_RN likes this.
  4. Visit  steelydanfan profile page
    1
    Quote from Pfiesty
    cdsga: I have called OSHA a few times about very specific violations and they did not even check them out. The problem is that most of the OSHA personnel are generalists or specialists in construction and other non-health care industry injuries. Fo the most part, they don't even understand healthcare risks. I don't think any of them have ever heard of "bloodborne pathogen" and think that violence is not violence if it is a sick patient doing it. At least that is what I have found from the Atlanta regional (SE USA) offices.
    OSHA came into OUR facility recently and decide that all our portable computers had to be kept in the med room when "not directly in use", because a visitor "might" trip over them.

    These units are 3 feet tall, weigh approx. 60lbs, and are 24 inches wide. Unless someone is blind, they could not fail to see or avoid them. So now the nurses have to haul these bad boys in, out and down halls all day.

    How many very expensive back injuries will occur before OSHA decides they made a bad call?
    Pfiesty likes this.
  5. Visit  Pfiesty profile page
    0
    Correct SteelyDanFan!

    OSHA inspectors are completely confused in the healthcare setting. Meanwhile, hundreds of healthcare workers die each year from job related injuries, and serious non-fatal injuries happen by the thousands every day. There is not one OSHA inspector who can even define these real hazards much less recognize them.
    Last edit by Pfiesty on Feb 4, '11 : Reason: forgot
  6. Visit  Kooky Korky profile page
    1
    Someone before me said it - let the rulemakers come to and stay at the bedside or on the Psych ward for a few hours, for a few days, let them feel the terror and the pain of being assaulted, and then let's hear what they have to say about restraints.

    Great, doing away with restraints if the current standard of care. Doing away with them totally is very unsafe, as we se from the article and from anecdotal reports here.

    If equipment is unsafe, like that dumbwaiter, just don't use it.
    herring_RN likes this.
  7. Visit  tencat profile page
    2
    I'm glad OSHA came in and fined them, but that fine was pretty pathetic.

    Side note: Hospital CEO's name is "Proffitt"....says it all, doesn't it?
    Not_A_Hat_Person and herring_RN like this.
  8. Visit  belgarion profile page
    0
    In my years in manufacturing and supervising field trials I can say I lost all respect for OSHA a long time ago. We had employees make complaints all the time. Some were valid, some weren't. Usually, OSHA would send the complaint back to us to answer. If our answer was satisfactory. OSHA was happy. On the rare occasions OSHA actually showed up they were more interested in making sure our documentation was in order and we were properly reporting all OSHA recordable injuries than in a physical inspection. I might add that what constitutes an OSHA recordable changes every year.

    Also, thanks to the wimpy fine structure, many companies (including hospitals) find that it is often cheaper to pay the fine than to fix the problem. As one of our bean counters said in a closed meeting one day, "As long as it costs less to ingore it than to fix it we will ignore it."

    Want to know who really got our upper management's attention? Factory Mutual. If they found something in one of their inspections they didn't like, they could pull our insurance or raise the rates. Now THAT put fear in the hearts of CEOs.
  9. Visit  TDCHIM profile page
    0
    Quote from belgarion
    In my years in manufacturing and supervising field trials I can say I lost all respect for OSHA a long time ago. We had employees make complaints all the time. Some were valid, some weren't. Usually, OSHA would send the complaint back to us to answer. If our answer was satisfactory. OSHA was happy. On the rare occasions OSHA actually showed up they were more interested in making sure our documentation was in order and we were properly reporting all OSHA recordable injuries than in a physical inspection. I might add that what constitutes an OSHA recordable changes every year.

    Also, thanks to the wimpy fine structure, many companies (including hospitals) find that it is often cheaper to pay the fine than to fix the problem. As one of our bean counters said in a closed meeting one day, "As long as it costs less to ingore it than to fix it we will ignore it."

    Want to know who really got our upper management's attention? Factory Mutual. If they found something in one of their inspections they didn't like, they could pull our insurance or raise the rates. Now THAT put fear in the hearts of CEOs.
    To be fair, I've seen OSHA do some excellent work. In one incident involving a huge automotive parts factory that I covered during my days as a reporter, OSHA's persistence made a major difference in the lives of hundreds of affected employees. And the public information resulting from the investigation helped to bring a lot of negative publicity down on the factory and its parent corporation, which also helped the employees win a better settlement for the health problems they suffered as a result of management's actions.

    I completely agree that the pathetic fines are often less troubling than a mosquito bite for many corporations. We really need to push our corporate-lackey legislators to revise the fines and other punitive measures so that the companies truly fear the consequences of such infractions. Nothing else will make upper management officials (in any company and any industry or profession) change their ways.


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