One-third of RNs Plan to Leave Job in Next 3 Years, Survey Finds - page 6

by Miss Chybil RN 10,297 Views | 54 Comments

Maybe hospitals should start hiring some new grads to get them up to speed with in the next 1-3 years? Just a thought...... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from hyunjoo82
    johnnybravo8802,

    Is there a particular answer you want to get from this thread? We get it that there are people who hate their jobs or they aren't fit for their jobs. I'm also glad that you are able to have your own business now, which is less stressful to you. I've gone the opposite and although I am ten years younger than you, I know at this age that a family business is not for me right now, even if I made a lot of money from it (since money does not ensure happiness, neither does any job/career). I spent half of my life avoiding coming to my own home because I didn't want to deal with the work that waited for me at home. I also spent the latter part of my life thinking that my life would be easier if I were to die somehow (although I could never commit suicide) but that's how miserable I was and I got out--just like you did. So what if most of us become nurses and discover that maybe we aren't cut out for this job? We will all cross that bridge (several times, even) if we get there. Best of luck to you.
    The truth is, I still do nursing assignments from time to time and try to keep up with the profession as a whole. Personally, I'd like to see nursing change and earn more respect but it's going to take a lot to change it and I'm not sure you or I will see it in a lifetime. Hospitals are "Big Business" and it's only going to get worse. I enjoy the job of nursing but the co-workers and the demands make it a difficult job to deal with. I also think it's a shame to spend years in school(I spent 6) just to come out with a smile on your face and have people wipe that smile off your face real quick. I've been a nurse for 16 years but there's something wrong when a person is getting out of a profession after 1-3 years and someone needs to look at that.
  2. 0
    one thing that is chasing nurses here away as the economy gets better is crap like the hospital system i work for phasing out 8hr shifts completely so many older nurses who have decades of super-valuable experience are leaving because they just physically can't be on their feet for 12hrs, who can blame them? many single parents are being forced to leave too.. you also only get paid time & a half for holidays for 8 hrs not the 12hrs that you actually work, no, they dock your PTO to cover that.

    for example, say you work Christmas Eve day shift 0700-1900, you get time & a half for 8hrs, then you get base pay & the system pulls the "half" part out of your PTO so you burn 2 hours of PTO when you are WORKING!! people are leaving over this too...
  3. 0
    Quote from johnnybravo8802
    The truth is, I still do nursing assignments from time to time and try to keep up with the profession as a whole. Personally, I'd like to see nursing change and earn more respect but it's going to take a lot to change it and I'm not sure you or I will see it in a lifetime. Hospitals are "Big Business" and it's only going to get worse. I enjoy the job of nursing but the co-workers and the demands make it a difficult job to deal with. I also think it's a shame to spend years in school(I spent 6) just to come out with a smile on your face and have people wipe that smile off your face real quick. I've been a nurse for 16 years but there's something wrong when a person is getting out of a profession after 1-3 years and someone needs to look at that.
    By the time I graduate with a BSN, I too will be in school for six years (I'll be 30). One thing that I am thankful for is that I didn't start college until I was 24 (because of family business) and it helped me figure out what I'm good at and what I can handle. So many of my friends graduated after the traditional four years of college and then they didn't even use their majors or they ended up doing something completely different than what they thought they wanted. I know that's not going to be me though. I agree with you that it's sad when someone only stays in nursing for lesser amount of time than they were actually in school to obtain their degree. In fact, I could say now that sometimes I've thought "Half of these students applying and getting into nursing programs are just taking up space from the ones who actually want and can do nursing" because they are my competitors to get into schools.

    What sort of business do you have now? Is it something completely different from nursing or is it still in the medical field?
  4. 0
    Quote from hyunjoo82
    By the time I graduate with a BSN, I too will be in school for six years (I'll be 30). One thing that I am thankful for is that I didn't start college until I was 24 (because of family business) and it helped me figure out what I'm good at and what I can handle. So many of my friends graduated after the traditional four years of college and then they didn't even use their majors or they ended up doing something completely different than what they thought they wanted. I know that's not going to be me though. I agree with you that it's sad when someone only stays in nursing for lesser amount of time than they were actually in school to obtain their degree. In fact, I could say now that sometimes I've thought "Half of these students applying and getting into nursing programs are just taking up space from the ones who actually want and can do nursing" because they are my competitors to get into schools.

    What sort of business do you have now? Is it something completely different from nursing or is it still in the medical field?
    I do landscape management. I've been in the industry majority of my life and I live for it. Believe it or not, I'm doing well, even with the economy. I like the lack of BS-I know what to do, do it, and go home with nobody standing over me micromanaging me. I also take breaks when I want to, I quit working when I want to, and I can make $1200 before lunch and take a nap the rest of the day. I'm not exaggerating when I say that. As long as you show up and do the job you were hired for, nobody is threatening to take your license if you make one simple mistake. I could go on and on but you get the picture. Working 13 week assignments allows me to pay off bills and keep my skills up and I only have to put up with hospital politics 13 weeks out of the year. I have a lot of ICU experience and like actually practicing the medicine, which you don't get on the floor. I love saving lives and being there for families who are asking my opinion about decelerating care on their loved one. I love learning the A@P of a patient and running codes just to see the person walk out of the hospital and thank you in the end. I've touched a lot of lives since 1992 and loved each one of them and would love nursing if you could just "nurse" but the system has made that impossible.
  5. 0
    Quote from burntoutnurse30
    I am definitely not one of those nurses that will be leaving in 3 years. I am looking for a way out now. I have been a nurse for 11 years and over those years things have gotten from bad to worse. Nursing is a high stress job and the stress is becoming too much to handle. I am sure all hospitals are not the same but all the ones I have worked at has brought me no joy. What I have discovered is the more technologically advance these hospitals are the more work and the more stress. I am off from work today because after yesterday there was no way I could function at work today. I am a float RN and have been floating for 8 years, yesterday I floated to post surgical tele floor. I started with 4 pts, not bad ,all the other nurses had 5. Of course it was planned this way so that I can have the first admission, float nurses always get the shorter end of the stick. All my pts were total care, there was only two techs for 25 patients so you have to help with baths, the diapers, getting on and off the bed pan, potty chair toilet and assist with feeding, etc and you have to help pass and pick up your trays for all meals. you are expected to ambulate post op pts. You are suppose to make sure pt are up in the chair for meals. Pts that has not been up for weeks, You as a nurse has super powers and some special technique that you know how to move these pts. Now lets get to nursing, I recieved a new admission at 0930, a direct admit at that, meaning nothing is done on this pt, therefore you have to do everything that is usually done in ER. Mind you I am still in the process of passing meds and getting my other 4 pts situated. CT is calling, X ray is calling, Lab is calling, Transporters need your assistance. Family standing in the hallway wanting to speak with you. Family on the phone wanting to speak with you. PT wanting to speak with you, OT wanting to speak with you. ST wanting you speak you. You have critical lab values to call to the physician. The Physician is asking questions about the last shift. you can't hardly keep up with what is going on with your shift more over what happen on the previous shift. Pts are mad about there pain medicine because you are not getting there fast enough. The doctor just walked out the room and for some reason the pt had amnesia and forgot about what they needed while he was there, so now on top of everything going on you have to call the doctor about bullsh##t. You have to transfer pts, you call report the receiving nurse wants everything done so you are in a rush to get the pt gone to free up the bed for new pt. Everyone wants to know what is taking so long, the charge nurse can't help because she has 5 pts also. The nurse manager is walking around with a list of Core measure bulls##t that is not done, and you get written up if you leave without getting it done. Next thing you know it is 4 pm you haven't had a break not to mention lunch or even going to the bathroom. It is close to end of the shift so you have to rush so the next nurse isn't complaining about what is not done. You give report at 7 and spend the next two hours trying to chart. Your long 12 hour shift is now 14 hours and you are hungry, tired, frustrated and have to do it all over again tomorrow. The sad part about this, no one cares just get the work done. I HATE my job.
    Sounds like two jobs from he|| I've had

    The only thing you forgot to mention is the certainty that someone will get on you about your incidental/unplanned/unapproved) OT... like you enjoy working 14+ hours without a break when you're scheduled for 12

    DeLana


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