'Onboard' New Nurses to Prevent Them from Jumping Ship

  1. Rebecca Hendren, for HealthLeaders Media, September 7, 2010

    I've been thinking about new graduate nurses a lot recently. In my conversations with managers and educators, we talk about ways they are training new grads at their organizations and their greatest concerns. Their two top priorities are to ensure new nurse competency and to "onboard" the new staff to their organization....

    Full story here:
    http://www.healthleadersmedia.com/pa...m-Jumping-Ship
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  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   NurseSuzann
    Thats a great policy, I wish more facilities would follow it
  4. by   mariahas4kids
    I have found that most residency programs are just for new grads or nurses with 1 year or less of experience. I feel they need to be more open to nurses trying to get into a new area - med surg to nursery etc. It is not enough to be an experienced nurse, you have to have the right experience to get a job. Heaven forbid if you are not considered a new grad, yet are trying to find a job.
  5. by   NurseSuzann
    That is also true, improvements are needed all around, because sometimes people want to change specialties and they should be able to transition with some dedication and continuing ed, but from what I've heard its hard once you're "pegged"
  6. by   Rook
    Hospitals have already tackled this problem. Its actually very simple. By not hiring new grads there is no reason to adopt policies to retain them.
  7. by   Boston-RN
    ummm....although I think new grads are tough to train and retain....if an organization doesn't make the effort, then who is to support the remaining staff during vacations, PTO, LOA, retirement, career changes and the rest of the inevitible?? new grads are necessary in all careers, not just nursing, that to me is kind of an obvious statement.
  8. by   BeANurse2010
    What about Sub-Acute in a Nursing Home? Great experience...always on your toe's and a lot to learn!! Never a dull moment!! Either that or a Re-hab Facility. The jobs are available all though the pay might just be average!!
  9. by   elprup
    Quote from Rook
    Hospitals have already tackled this problem. Its actually very simple. By not hiring new grads there is no reason to adopt policies to retain them.
    Exactly!
  10. by   kasendamiles86
    Quote from BeANurse2010
    What about Sub-Acute in a Nursing Home? Great experience...always on your toe's and a lot to learn!! Never a dull moment!! Either that or a Re-hab Facility. The jobs are available all though the pay might just be average!!
    ^^^^^^"pay" part.... When I worked in a facility as a new grad rehab etc, I made the same if not more than my friends who worked in hospitals...No biggie but I don't think that part is true, or maybe it depends on the state.
  11. by   Not_A_Hat_Person
    Quote from BeANurse2010
    What about Sub-Acute in a Nursing Home? Great experience...always on your toe's and a lot to learn!! Never a dull moment!! Either that or a Re-hab Facility. The jobs are available all though the pay might just be average!!
    Between the lack of support and the high patient:nurse ratios, a nursing home can be a very dangerous place for a new grad. Nursing homes in my area aren't interested in new grads.
  12. by   d'cm
    A problem I have encountered is that when the new nurse is in the "shock phase" her/his superiors aren't "on board" with the program and they salt the wounds which severs any emotional ties the newbie was developing -> newbie overboard! (if not immediate and actual, the "feeling" is still there).
  13. by   BeANurse2010
    O.K. Several Idea...do some jobs at like big hospitals in a LPN or M.A. capability. It gets you in the door. You get to work in a hospital environment...and when you totally prove yourself they will offer you the RN postion. Good Luck!!
  14. by   jamielynne083
    My first job as a new graduate was at a nursing home/rehab facility and I'm glad. great experience and yes it does keep me on my toes! But I can see where it might not be a good option for a new grad. I really think I lucked out and found a great place to work where EVERYONE was there for me if I needed anything or had a question. I started and still currently work on the re-hab unit. But I see older nurses who have worked in a hospital their whole career really struggle with the nurse/pt. ratio. So I'm glad I have the experience.

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'Onboard' New Nurses to Prevent Them from Jumping Ship