'Onboard' New Nurses to Prevent Them from Jumping Ship - page 3

by DoGoodThenGo

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Rebecca Hendren, for HealthLeaders Media, September 7, 2010 I've been thinking about new graduate nurses a lot recently. In my conversations with managers and educators, we talk about ways they are training new grads at their... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Boston-RN
    ummm....although I think new grads are tough to train and retain....if an organization doesn't make the effort, then who is to support the remaining staff during vacations, PTO, LOA, retirement, career changes and the rest of the inevitible?? new grads are necessary in all careers, not just nursing, that to me is kind of an obvious statement.
    Yes, I believe for the sake of patient care in the long run, something will need to be done soon. And the fact that "ALL" RN's started somewhere -what has happened?? New graduates have gone through some pretty high hoops that gives us the flexibility to adapt to new places, new systems, multiple hospital systems, protocols, and technologies. Many seasoned nurses on the floor have been doing the same things for longer periods of time & are great at these repetitous skills but I couldn't help but notice how they freak out when new pumps or other programs were changed. Yet we are introduced in one day to a new rotation hospital/floor, the next day we have to study, fill out pathophysiology info on 3-4 patients by 7 or 8 am and be ready for rounds with the night-shift nurse. Just when we got used to the routines we were once again sent off to another hospital/floor.
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    Having gone through onboarding as a new nurse, I can say that it is helpful. On the other hand, all the onboarding in the world won't keep nurses from jumping ship when you overload them with high pt ratios, without the support system to back them up. This is the real reason why new nurses jump ship, not because they need more orientation.


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