Obama Orders FDA to Zero In on Drug Shortage Crisis - page 2

by herring_RN 2,498 Views | 14 Comments Guide

…President Obama called for swift government action Monday against a drug shortage crisis that's increasingly left doctors and hospitals scrambling for life-saving medications -- often including those used in cancer and emergency... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    The government cannot force a company to make a product if it does not want to. Another reason for product shortages is there are many times a lack of the basic raw ingredients used in these drugs. Many times political strife or warfare in certain parts of the world make getting the ingredients impossible. An executive order is not going to make the drugs appear suddenly if they are not being made.
    Actually, during states of emergency or times of war, the chief executive and commander-in-chief has very broad powers. GWB chose to put us in a state of perpetual war so, in fact, the president *could* do so if he chose.

    However, even without such dictatorial moves, the government wields enormous power over the drug companies in the fashion which I mentioned earlier... mere mention of reduction of patent terms for blockbuster drugs or the possibility of imposing price controls would bring those companies to the table.

    Further, it could be legislated that a certain percentage of a company's production be dedicated to certain families of medications.

    Or, acting as the single biggest purchaser of drugs through federal health plans, the military, the VA, and Medicare, the feds could 'negotiate' terms to address the problem.

    The primary issue is the refusal to confront the corporacracy that now rules our world.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and herring_RN like this.
  2. 1
    I can think of no faster or more efficient way to encourage drug companies to exit the U.S. market entirely than to mandate their drug production, pricing or interfere in any new or expansive way in their business.

    Obama is impotent in addressing the economy in this nation, ans has taken to Executive Orders in an attempt to look tough in addressing issues.

    It is having the opposite effect of highlighting his ineffectiveness and making him look silly.

    "You WILL make drugs because I say so!"

    Piffle.
    Kyrshamarks likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from Jolie
    I can think of no faster or more efficient way to encourage drug companies to exit the U.S. market entirely than to mandate their drug production, pricing or interfere in any new or expansive way in their business.

    Obama is impotent in addressing the economy in this nation, ans has taken to Executive Orders in an attempt to look tough in addressing issues.

    It is having the opposite effect of highlighting his ineffectiveness and making him look silly.

    "You WILL make drugs because I say so!"

    Piffle.
    The federal government uses its buying power to negotiate lower prices for the drugs it purchases for its beneficiaries, such as veterans, government employees and retirees. Same thing goes for most if not all countries that have single payer programs and one does not hear many complaints. Those that are made usually come from pharma companies grousing about their "profits", but what else is new?

    Many private insurance companies and other groups in this country also use their purchasing power to obtain better rates for meds. It is mainly Medicare, Medicaid and the uninsured that are left at the mercy of the pharma companies to being charged what the market will bear.

    Pharma compaines are global behemoths and their primary goal is to make money or at least turn a profit after paying for R&D (so they say). There is no reason why meds costing $$ in say France must cost $$$$ in the USA. This is one reason big pharma is so against allowing imported drugs into the United States. They use the arguement that such meds may be less effective and or not made to the same high standards. For the record those advocating such measures aren't speaking of some off the wall production from Unga-Bunga land, just the same stuff sold in other major Western countries. Or are we to believe the USA gets the good stuff and the rest is somehow of poorer quality flogged off everywhere else.
  4. 0
    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    The government cannot force a company to make a product if it does not want to.
    No, but it can force said company, via tax laws, to leave America altogether, thus creating unemployed Americans.
    It can force Americans to get shot full of radiation at the airport.
    It can spray chem trails, filling our air and food-growing soil and food-yielding waterways with barium, aluminum, and other metals.
    It can dictate what our kids learn in public schools, even in home schools or church-run schools.
    And let's not even start on forcing people to get vaccinated.
    Where's the justice?
  5. 0
    Quote from UnionRN2
    Years ago when I worked in a pharmacy the pharmacist showed me an article in a journal from a pharmacy organization he belonged to. Basically it said that company A had bought all the raw ingredients needed by Company B to put out a certain drug. Company A didn't need the ingredients for their product, they were just holding on to it so that their competing product would gain an edge in sales. Company B took company A to court after failed negotiations. Company A destroyed the stash of the raw materials.

    I wonder how much of this is still going on and contributing to the shortages. And it makes me wonder how many of these shortages are done on purpose to drive up the prices and put more money in the pockets of those CEOs of the drug companies.
    My local alternative paper had an article about drug shortages in September.

    What’s causing the drug shortages currently plaguing America’s hospitals? Quality problems, including potentially deadly microbial contamination, caused more than half of the recent shortages in injectable drugs, according to the FDA. Other factors impacting the supply chain, according to government and nonprofit researchers, as well as pharmaceutical trade publications, include: cost-cutting manufacture, lack of raw ingredients, just-in-time production, Medicare price controls, discontinuation of less lucrative products, domestic and foreign outsourcing, substandard ingredients, and so-called “pay to delay” deals, in which makers of brand-name drugs with patents about to expire pay generic drug makers to delay marketing of generic versions.
    (emphasis mine)


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