NY state using hidden cameras to catch abuse: Nine arrested

  1. nine arrested in queens nursing home surveillance
    north country gazette - chestertown,ny,usa


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    queens---nine employees of the hollis park manor nursing home in queens have been arrested after a hidden camera revealed evidence of widespread patient neglect and falsification of patient records. among those arrested was a physician who served as the medical director of the nursing home, two licensed practical nurses and six nurse aides....
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  2. 45 Comments

  3. by   ChocoholicRN
    This is just absolutely terrible. And to know that this is happening not just in this one nursing home, but everywhere, just gives me chills.
  4. by   BSNtobe2009
    A good reason to employ cameras everywhere.
  5. by   Blackcat99
    These hidden cameras are great!!!! I sure wish all of the nursing homes were using hidden cameras.
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I hope managers in this case don't escape scrutiny. Purposeful understaffing should be looked into.
  7. by   ZASHAGALKA
    I always conduct myself at work in patient rooms and at the drug dispensing machine AS IF there were a camera watching my every move. I won't even pick my nose in those places. Shoot, with the cheap availability of small and hidden cameras, this is possible even if the State didn't set up the camera.

    "In fact, the videotapes demonstrated that he (the doctor) had entered the room of the patient on only one of the days and on that day all he did was peer at the patient without conducting an examination."


    All the doc did was peer at the patient: gee, that NEVER happens where I work. (sarcasm intended)

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  8. by   banditrn
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    I won't even pick my nose in those places.
    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Oh, Timothy, Gosh, where IS it safe to pick your nose anymore?!!

    I've gotta wonder, tho, would these camera's in a patients room violate any HIPAA thing?
  9. by   Simplepleasures
    Yes I think cameras are a good tool for this type of thing. Who set up the camera, the state or the family? If it was the family,I wonder where was the oversight by the regulating bodies, why did the state examiners not catch this, well I guess it probably wasnt caught because nursing homes always seem to know when "state" is about to do their survey.LTC facilities are GREAT at hiding things, I was fired because I reported to the state this practice of "hiding" things. Looks like the DOJ is going to take the place of the "state" in enforcing healthcare laws. IF it was the state that set up the camera, I say to them BRAVO!
    Thank God there is a law in Wisconsin to protect nurses who report these despicable practises to the state or even just complain about them in house , then get fired. I hope other states follow suit, we need it BAD.I am glad to see that in this case the administration was also held to account for these acts.Its about time!!
    Last edit by Simplepleasures on Nov 25, '06
  10. by   indigo girl
    Did the state place the cameras? Is the attorney general planning on running for higher office, i.e. governor? This reminds me of what happened in Philly years ago when the attorney general had his sights on the governor's office.
    I'm not saying the staff should be excused, but I am wondering about all the motives involved in placing cameras. Also, this would seem to be a hugh,
    HIPAA violation. Did the patient or his family give permission?
    Last edit by indigo girl on Nov 26, '06
  11. by   lyceeboo
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I hope managers in this case don't escape scrutiny. Purposeful understaffing should be looked into.
    DITTO what Hellllllo Nurse said. These LPN's are in big trouble but the problems probably trickle down from the top.
  12. by   CHATSDALE
    as for hippa violationss family members ae given a big sheaf of papers to sign, would need to be a lawyer with all day to study them to really be informed of everything they are signing..not saying that they were not or under informed but this could be the case..if they were knowledgeable they were probably told it was a safegard for their relatives welfare

    and it was

    this smacks of big brother but if you do your job as if someone with clout is looking over your shoulder and chart everything possible you shuld be able to protect yourself..and maybe some of those who do not do their job will be weeded out or scared out
  13. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I hope managers in this case don't escape scrutiny. Purposeful understaffing should be looked into.
    I second that. Most nursing home staffing grids are designed so that no one, not CNAs, not nurses, can possibly do that amount of work in the allotted time frame.

    The cop-out will be that they shouldn't have been working in such conditions, but frankly, the State isn't stupid, and neither is the BON. Both are remiss for allowing individual employees take the hit when the problem is so pervasive.
  14. by   lyceeboo
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I second that. Most nursing home staffing grids are designed so that no one, not CNAs, not nurses, can possibly do that amount of work in the allotted time frame.

    The cop-out will be that they shouldn't have been working in such conditions, but frankly, the State isn't stupid, and neither is the BON. Both are remiss for allowing individual employees take the hit when the problem is so pervasive.
    EXACTLY. That will be the cop-out and the little guy (nurse) will take the fall.

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