NY state using hidden cameras to catch abuse: Nine arrested - page 3

nine arrested in queens nursing home surveillance north country gazette - chestertown,ny,usa queens---nine employees of the hollis park manor nursing home in queens have been arrested after... Read More

  1. by   CityKat
    Someone at the hospital here in Brooklyn today told me that a hidden camera is not a violation of HIPPA if the patients safety is in question. I don't know how valid this is, does anyone else?
  2. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from oramar
    There is a story about a fatal mine accident in todays paper. The author decrys the fact that the immediate supervisors were severly penalized for the accident but the mine owners have not recieved as much as a fine. The author pointed out that the accident was really a result of the mine owners relentless pursuit of profit over safety. I am bringing this up to point out that other industries are having similar problems to healthcare. You can throw all the LPNs and NAs in the state in jail and it won't change one thing unless you go after the people who put profit over good care.
    Truer words have never been spoken. Why hasnt the DOJ gone after the corporations that gave birth to this nightmare?
  3. by   RedZeppelinRN
    Quote from ingelein
    Yes I think cameras are a good tool for this type of thing. Who set up the camera, the state or the family? If it was the family,I wonder where was the oversight by the regulating bodies, why did the state examiners not catch this, well I guess it probably wasnt caught because nursing homes always seem to know when "state" is about to do their survey.LTC facilities are GREAT at hiding things, I was fired because I reported to the state this practice of "hiding" things. Looks like the DOJ is going to take the place of the "state" in enforcing healthcare laws. IF it was the state that set up the camera, I say to them BRAVO!
    Thank God there is a law in Wisconsin to protect nurses who report these despicable practises to the state or even just complain about them in house , then get fired. I hope other states follow suit, we need it BAD.I am glad to see that in this case the administration was also held to account for these acts.Its about time!!
    I was fired from a small ambulatory facility for threatening to report the owner to the State because cnas were only playing and not taking care of the residents, including safety issues such as falls and fractures. I have not received a report from the State investigator as yet, and they were also in Survey by the State. They did tell me they could not deal with any issues about the firing and to report it to the Department of Labor. Although this is an "at will" State, but supposedly by law, can take reports of retaliation complaints, all I got was a form letter by the BL with some nonsense saying I didnt have grounds. I wonder what some of these regulatory agencies are in business for.
  4. by   RedZeppelinRN
    Hey ingelein: I meant to make this reply to another poster. Sorry for redundancy.
  5. by   RedZeppelinRN
    I posted a note to you on the second page to ingelein. It is about threatening to call the State because of care and safety concerns of the residents. Also, the "Medical Director" did the same as the one you talked about. Just said things like "how are you doing?" No examination. Just yelled for more progress notes for the pile of charts, some he didn't even put a name on. Hope you find the post to you.
  6. by   LEVODEVO
    We jsut had a couple of new ICU'S built,looks like something out of a science fisction movie,the public is wowedso it worked,same bozo's running the place,so nothing's changed but the patients johnnies.Anywho,I'm staring up at the ceiling one day,and I notice the camera,same ones Walmart and SEARS use.looks like someone stuck an upside down black bowl to the ceiling.So I told my fellow nurses who all immediately started scratching thier asses and picking their noses.We had heard some rumors that a doc and nurse from ER had been let go...pretty serious stuff,right away eveyone thinks drugs without even knowing the names of the folks.Wrong!! they got caught doing the wild thing(standing up!)in one of the access stairways...but by one of the cameras in the ceiling..I winder how many times the cops watched the flick before they called the nursing super.I welcome the cameras,if you're doing your job you have nothign to fear,we've had so mcuh violence and the hreat of violence from the public and sometimes staff,that it certainly would eradicate the typical 'he said,she said' crap the public always pulls and gets away.
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    I think all should know there are cameras and where they are. In public hallways, nurses stations, the pharmact and other areas to prevent crime.
    No to violate a patients privacy or in the break room. Your time is your own
    After a night shift I change into street clothes unless going right home.
    Please no security looking at this old woman in her undrerwear!
  8. by   12hours
    They can videotape and arrest staff all they want. It won't change the fact that the real reason for substandard care in snf's is understaffing. CNA's are the backbone of the nursing homes and they should only have 10 or less residents plus a turning/lift team to assist them. Based on my experience, there were several occassions wherein one aide is assigned to 20 or more residents. An LPN/LVN should not have more than 20 residents assigned to them.
  9. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from 12hours
    They can videotape and arrest staff all they want. It won't change the fact that the real reason for substandard care in snf's is understaffing. CNA's are the backbone of the nursing homes and they should only have 10 or less residents plus a turning/lift team to assist them. Based on my experience, there were several occassions wherein one aide is assigned to 20 or more residents. An LPN/LVN should not have more than 20 residents assigned to them.
    I agree wholeheartedly, but until corporatre greed, that created this nightmare, can be controlled by laws that MANDATE decent care, we are stuck with substandard LTC facilities that continue to get away with it. I think cameras should be placed in the corporate office during a fiscal planning meeting.
  10. by   indigo girl
    Quote from 12hours
    They can videotape and arrest staff all they want. It won't change the fact that the real reason for substandard care in snf's is understaffing. CNA's are the backbone of the nursing homes and they should only have 10 or less residents plus a turning/lift team to assist them. Based on my experience, there were several occassions wherein one aide is assigned to 20 or more residents. An LPN/LVN should not have more than 20 residents assigned to them.
    I'll be working a facility tonight where the LPN will have 70 to 73 patients with 3 CNA (could be two if one calls out), and the RN supervisor has 30+ with 2 CNA and, the responsibility of the building. They finally got permission to go to 3 nurses soon, and an extra CNA, but only if the other nurse is on staff so if one calls out, it will back to the old ratio. It is a bare bones type of place with a just in time (or not) delivery system of supplies. Something is always lacking there. In these type of places of which there are many, money is always spent on appearances, but any nurse who eyeballs a medroom and the staffing, can figure out that money is not going into patient care.
  11. by   nursekatie22
    Reports like this make me physically ill.
  12. by   firstaiddave907
    I think it is a great idea to have hidden camaras in all nurseing homes
  13. by   TrudyRN
    I fully agree that we need cameras in Admin offices.

    What about HIPPA?

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