NY state using hidden cameras to catch abuse: Nine arrested - page 2

nine arrested in queens nursing home surveillance north country gazette - chestertown,ny,usa queens---nine employees of the hollis park manor nursing home in queens have been arrested after... Read More

  1. by   lyceeboo
    Quote from ingelein
    ..."why did the state examiners not catch this, well I guess it probably wasnt caught because nursing homes always seem to know when "state" is about to do their survey.LTC facilities are GREAT at hiding things, I was fired because I reported to the state this practice of "hiding" things.
    Thank God there is a law in Wisconsin to protect nurses who report these despicable practises to the state or even just complain about them in house , then get fired. I hope other states follow suit, we need it BAD.
    Totally agree!

    About 5 yrs ago I mearly suggested that my LTC employer could be reported for an OSHA violation. (The night RN got a needle stick & the DON wouldn't allow her to leave the NH to be checked out in at a nearby ER. The DON didn't want to cover the shift or find coverage while the RN was off the floor.) The fact that I said this was repeated to the DON & NH owner and I was fired. 6 mojnths later I got a registered letter from the Louisiana State BON with a list of 8 bogus allegations the nursing home made against me.

    Seems some LTC's are owned by greedy underhanded slime and I was an easy target.
  2. by   banditrn
    Quote from CHATSDALE
    as for hippa violationss family members ae given a big sheaf of papers to sign, would need to be a lawyer with all day to study them to really be informed of everything they are signing..not saying that they were not or under informed but this could be the case..if they were knowledgeable they were probably told it was a safegard for their relatives welfare

    and it was

    this smacks of big brother but if you do your job as if someone with clout is looking over your shoulder and chart everything possible you shuld be able to protect yourself..and maybe some of those who do not do their job will be weeded out or scared out
    Chatsdale - what if a resident's FAMILY placed a camera? In a private room, of course. Would this be a violation of anything?
  3. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from lyceeboo
    Totally agree!

    About 5 yrs ago I mearly suggested that my LTC employer could be reported for an OSHA violation. (The night RN got a needle stick & the DON wouldn't allow her to leave the NH to be checked out in at a nearby ER. The DON didn't want to cover the shift or find coverage while the RN was off the floor.) The fact that I said this was repeated to the DON & NH owner and I was fired. 6 mojnths later I got a registered letter from the Louisiana State BON with a list of 8 bogus allegations the nursing home made against me.

    Seems some LTC's are owned by greedy underhanded slime and I was an easy target.
    If you think LTC's are slimy , you should have seen their lawyers in my own court case! My attorney( a women,pregnant) got so mad after one of their bulldog lawyers called me a perjurer, she stood up and yelled at him and called him a few choice words,I was worried she was going to miscarry! All the while the judge just shook his head and smiled.I really love my attornies and the Wisconsin Healthcare Worker Retaliation Protection Law.
    Last edit by Simplepleasures on Nov 26, '06
  4. by   Kait
    As an RN and as a person with an 82-year-old grandmother (who thankfully still has her independence), I am horrified by this. It's so awful to think of neglecting your patients, people who depend on you for their care, and can't do it themselves...it's a moral thing as well as of course it being your JOB.

    Still...part of me has to question what the staffing levels are like; hopefully they were looked into as a part of this. There's no excuse for indolence, but I know in the care home next to my hospital care is at a ratio of 1/2 an RN, 1 LPN, and 2 care aids for 30 patients bedridden clients on a floor. I have no doubt there's things that don't get done there with staffing like that there, too.
  5. by   RN4MERCY
    Quote from lyceeboo
    DITTO what Hellllllo Nurse said. These LPN's are in big trouble but the problems probably trickle down from the top.
    I agree and I'm not so sure cameras are the answer as much as ethics. The problem is that laws exist that are supposed to protect patients but hospital/healthcare industry money is used to block legislation that would effectively penalize unscrupulous employers. The industry is also trying to take away the worker's constitutional rights to freedom of association, to form unions (Oakwood/Kentucky River decision...lawsuit brought by nursing home operators!). Union protection against the abuses of "at-will" employment is one way to insure that whistleblowers who bring forward allegations of abuse and neglect and who advocate for better staffing don't have to fear losing their jobs.

    According to Character Counts and Michael Josephson, " What we're looking for is moral strength based on ethical principles. Character is revealed by actions, not words, especially when there's a gap between what we want to do and what we should do and when doing the right thing costs more than we want to pay.

    Our character is revealed by how we deal with pressures and temptations. But it's also disclosed by everyday actions, including what we say and do when we think no one is looking and we won't get caught. The way we treat people we think can't help or hurt us, like housekeepers, waiters and secretaries, tells more about our character than how we treat people we think are important. People who are honest, kind and fair only when there is something to gain shouldn't be confused with people of real character who demonstrate these qualities habitually, under all circumstances."

    With the cameras, it becomes a game of "catch me if you can." Observations of neglect and abuse made in real time and by real people often proceeds the installation of a camera. Why are credible witnesses being ignored; why do complaints to regulatory agencies go unanswered? As responsible citizens we need to demand that public safety and public benefit funding is restored so that our most vulnerable citizens have a voice in our democracy. The first order of business of government should be to protect our individual rights, not the rights of certain healthcare corporations who put profits before patient care.
  6. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from RN4MERCY
    I agree and I'm not so sure cameras are the answer as much as ethics. The problem is that laws exist that are supposed to protect patients but hospital/healthcare industry money is used to block legislation that would effectively penalize unscrupulous employers. The industry is also trying to take away the worker's constitutional rights to freedom of association, to form unions (Oakwood/Kentucky River decision...lawsuit brought by nursing home operators!). Union protection against the abuses of "at-will" employment is one way to insure that whistleblowers who bring forward allegations of abuse and neglect and who advocate for better staffing don't have to fear losing their jobs.

    With the cameras, it becomes a game of "catch me if you can." Observations of neglect and abuse made in real time and by real people often proceeds the installation of a camera. Why are credible witnesses being ignored; why do complaints to regulatory agencies go unanswered? As responsible citizens we need to demand that public safety and public benefit funding is restored so that our most vulnerable citizens have a voice in our democracy. The first order of business of government should be to protect our individual rights, not the rights of certain healthcare corporations who put profits before patient care.
    OMG! You said this TRUTH with so much eloquence. I hear on these threads all the time how awful our work environment is, and I am in complete agreement.Why do so many nurses voice such distrust over the good a union could do? I have read posts about ineffectual, or corrupt unions, I bet they ARE out there, but my daughter who is an Employment/Labor Attorney assures me they can be gotton rid of.I trust that she knows what she is talking about. Why not take the chance to improve our situation? I guess I would rather take my chances with trusting a union,who has the NLRB behind them than place my trust in the Corporation, who have money and big lawyers and GREED behind them .
    Last edit by Simplepleasures on Nov 27, '06
  7. by   lyceeboo
    Quote from RN4MERCY
    I agree and I'm not so sure cameras are the answer as much as ethics. The problem is that laws exist that are supposed to protect patients but hospital/healthcare industry money is used to block legislation that would effectively penalize unscrupulous employers. The industry is also trying to take away the worker's constitutional rights to freedom of association, to form unions (Oakwood/Kentucky River decision...lawsuit brought by nursing home operators!). Union protection against the abuses of "at-will" employment is one way to insure that whistleblowers who bring forward allegations of abuse and neglect and who advocate for better staffing don't have to fear losing their jobs.

    According to Character Counts and Michael Josephson, " What we're looking for is moral strength based on ethical principles. Character is revealed by actions, not words, especially when there's a gap between what we want to do and what we should do and when doing the right thing costs more than we want to pay.

    Our character is revealed by how we deal with pressures and temptations. But it's also disclosed by everyday actions, including what we say and do when we think no one is looking and we won't get caught. The way we treat people we think can't help or hurt us, like housekeepers, waiters and secretaries, tells more about our character than how we treat people we think are important. People who are honest, kind and fair only when there is something to gain shouldn't be confused with people of real character who demonstrate these qualities habitually, under all circumstances."

    With the cameras, it becomes a game of "catch me if you can." Observations of neglect and abuse made in real time and by real people often proceeds the installation of a camera. Why are credible witnesses being ignored; why do complaints to regulatory agencies go unanswered? As responsible citizens we need to demand that public safety and public benefit funding is restored so that our most vulnerable citizens have a voice in our democracy. The first order of business of government should be to protect our individual rights, not the rights of certain healthcare corporations who put profits before patient care.

    Awesome. This is off the subject but I have to say there have only been a few times when I've read something written by someone who knows how to put words together in a way that I can actually FEEL energy and power coming from the page....RN4MERCY you are definately have this talent.
  8. by   CHATSDALE
    Quote from banditrn
    Chatsdale - what if a resident's FAMILY placed a camera? In a private room, of course. Would this be a violation of anything?
    this would probably be legal, if the patient was informed and gave consent
    if pt was unable to give consent the the family member who was legally able to sign for pt would have to give the consent...the big mouth, know-it-all maybe not be responsible party and if the rp sees a tape of dear mother exposed on tape there may be the devil to play..hopefully the nurse won't be the one blamed
  9. by   indigo girl
    Quote from CHATSDALE
    this would probably be legal, if the patient was informed and gave consent
    if pt was unable to give consent the the family member who was legally able to sign for pt would have to give the consent...the big mouth, know-it-all maybe not be responsible party and if the rp sees a tape of dear mother exposed on tape there may be the devil to play..hopefully the nurse won't be the one blamed
    So, who did place that camera, and what did the family know?
  10. by   NorthernRose
    I work in an LTC faciltiy in NY. Supervisor came down the other night and told us to make sure we were doing what we are signing for, that the state had put hidden camera's in facilities throughout the state. She didnt say there were actually cameras anyplace, but wanted to give us a heads up it was a possibility. I personally don't worry about my CNA's on the floor, they are a great bunch of hard workers. 40 residents, ranging from total care to independent, rehabs to hospice, to 2 CNA's and myself (LPN).
    As far as the Attorney General (Spitzer) having inclinations towards higher levels of governing, he ran and won the govenorship this year. Word is he's already trying to tighten our belts, has a list of hospitals he wants merged or closed. Time will see what else he has in the works.
  11. by   oramar
    Quote from lyceeboo
    DITTO what Hellllllo Nurse said. These LPN's are in big trouble but the problems probably trickle down from the top.
    There is a story about a fatal mine accident in todays paper. The author decrys the fact that the immediate supervisors were severly penalized for the accident but the mine owners have not recieved as much as a fine. The author pointed out that the accident was really a result of the mine owners relentless pursuit of profit over safety. I am bringing this up to point out that other industries are having similar problems to healthcare. You can throw all the LPNs and NAs in the state in jail and it won't change one thing unless you go after the people who put profit over good care.
  12. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from NorthernRose
    As far as the Attorney General (Spitzer) having inclinations towards higher levels of governing, he ran and won the govenorship this year. Word is he's already trying to tighten our belts, has a list of hospitals he wants merged or closed. Time will see what else he has in the works.
    See report: Plan could close 20 or more New York hospitals

    More sweeping changes are states plans to close nursing homes, reduce SNF beds, convert to assisted living and combine facilities.....a MUST READ for all NY nurses.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Dec 2, '06
  13. by   indigo girl
    I read this with a sinking feeling in my stomach.
    In the event of any great need in the not too distant future, his legacy will be that he contributed to disaster.

    Contrast what he is doing with what the governor of Massachusetts is doing, and you get the feeling that either TPTB have given up on New York, or money is more important than people:
    BirdfluBreakingnews.com - Article

    Sorry for going off topic, but this seems so ill advised...
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 2, '06

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