Is Nursing Still an Attractive Career Choice? - page 5

by DoGoodThenGo

14,131 Views | 69 Comments

At a time of grim prospects for Americans without a college degree, nursing can look like a rare chance not just for a job but a real career. Or at least it did.... Read More


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    In regards to whether or not an area is "prestigious" the definition, according to a quick search on google is "Inspiring respect and admiration; having high status." If people who are looking for jobs view a hospital based nursing job as more desirable than long term care, then yes that means hospital based nursing jobs are more prestigious. Further, how many posts do you see about ltc nurses trying to get out of that area in because they want acute care experience?
    Prestige is not about knowing "the realities of nursing" or how much a job pays or whatnot. It's all about perception, and generally hospital based nursing is perceived to be more "desirable" or whatnot.
    This is not to belittle what ltc nurses do. We need good ltc nurses, and the job they do is every bit as essential as what an ICU nurse does. But, as far as "prestige" goes, the ICU nurse's job carries more prestige, whether it is deserved or not.
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    Megank5183

    Are you serious? As a new grad in IMC in Las Vegas (no state tax!) I made 57k! Geez low paid ICU? No thank you. The disparities in nurses' salaries always fascinates me. You can chalk it up to cost of living in some cases but not all. It is not even expensive to live in Las Vegas and I would still never settle for under 50k at a job. Nursing is worth more, period.
    joanna73, PMFB-RN, and sneeds like this.
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    Nursing is still an attractive career choice long as one goes into it with eyes wide open and is willing to make every effort in securing employment, even if it tis not what one wishes to start. In short the same as with any other occupation.

    The days of severe nursing shortages are pretty much over in most of the United States and may not return for years if they ever do; that is to the point new grads will be snapped out right out of school with huge financial inducements and so forth. Indeed the good ole days of being able to graduate from school on a Friday and have a nursing gig within a week or two is also pretty much gone and never likely to return.

    Hospitals and other healthcare facilities who employ nurses are going through financial upheavals that are only going to increase as "Obamacare" takes hold. That event coupled with now increasing pressure to bring down the high cost of healthcare in the United States as well as reform how it is provided means something is going to have to give. Nurses usually represent one of the largest labour costs for healthcare systems. They also represent some of the greatest liability after doctors in terms of malpractice. The trick for hospitals is to increase the efficiency of the nursing service whilst reducing other associated costs.

    What all this means for new grads and or those seeking to enter the profession is that the "warm body" days are pretty much over. Hospitals and other facilities are increasingly interested only in nurses that fit particular parameters which can vary by unit or system wide.

    As with the job market in general today one's degree (college, university, or whatever) is just the bar which everyone in a certain pool meets. The thing is what does one potential candidate for a position bring to the table that puts them over said bar? Here in NYC it is a given if one graduates from most nursing programs you have at least a "B" overall if not nursing and sciences GPA. Indeed a bulk of grads are coming out with GPAs of 3.5 to 4.0, so those sort of grades really aren't anything special anymore.


    Training any new employee is expensive and funds are tight across the labour market, so no one really wants to spend in that way. More and more employers and that includes those who hire nurses are looking for persons that can slip in and do the job with as little extra seasoning as possible. The idea of spending scarce funds to train a new employee who may either not work out and or simply leave and take those newly acquired skills elsewhere strikes fear in all employers.

    The other reality is that across much of this country the hospital market is shrinking. Places are closing and or being downsized into urgent/walk-in care centers. Either way such facilities rarely require the same 24/7 staffing of nurses done in hospitals. Thus the labour market for full-time hospital based nurses becomes tighter. Areas that are growing are the ones many seasoned and newly licensed nurses view with distain; LTC, community health, clinic, home care, nursing home/rehab, hospice and so forth.

    There is a vast disconnect on both the federal and state level regarding the future need for nurses. On the one had you have the federal and or local governments hatching all sorts of schemes to pay for everyone from military veterans to the unemployed to obtain nursing degrees (usually ADN), at a time when many hospitals are moving to hiring only or mainly BSN prepared nurses even if only for new grads. You add to this the fact that nursing programs have been pumping out grads at record levels due to the hype of a "nursing shortage", and you've got a nursing labour market that in many areas of this country is saturated. It could take years to absorb all the new grads as of today who do not have full time gigs, that is if they are all hired in hospitals at all.
    jtmarcy12, nursel56, ebinbrooklyn, and 4 others like this.
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    Quote from Jeanette73
    Does this writer even know what vital signs are? How is takng bp "less demanding" than taking temperature?
    Well one supposes that would depend upon where one was taking that temperature!
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    I find it interesting that those on this forum who have the most optimism for the RN profession are the nursing students and pre nursing students.

    Our jobs are continually being taken by "lesser trained" assistants as the article points out. I currently am working at a state facility and recently found out that the nurses may be on the chopping block. My coworker and I were just talking this AM about trying to get into "direct support" positions so we can at least keep our bennies.
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    Quote from hope3456
    I find it interesting that those on this forum who have the most optimism for the RN profession are the nursing students and pre nursing students.

    Our jobs are continually being taken by "lesser trained" assistants as the article points out. I currently am working at a state facility and recently found out that the nurses may be on the chopping block. My coworker and I were just talking this AM about trying to get into "direct support" positions so we can at least keep our bennies.
    If nursing functions are being handed over to UAPs whose fault is that? Every other profession guards their turf and often moves with quick and unified action against any perceived threats.

    The medical profession banded together and put up quite a fight when AP nurses were first allowed to write certain scripts and perform certain functions formerly well within the scope of physicians by both custom and practice. They continue to watch their flanks and make noises then they see or hear something they don't like.

    Bedside nursing been glamorous though perhaps working on the units, OR and or a few specialties such as L&D took things up a notch. Therefore it should come as no surprise with this huge push from some sectors in the profession for graduate degree nurses that whatever happens to those left behind on the front lines will have to fend for themselves.
    jtmarcy12 and carolinapooh like this.
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    I agree... Nurses need to be more unified with unions and such but it may be an uphill battle.
    jtmarcy12 and BrandonLPN like this.
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    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Or how about this gem from the article:

    There are still jobs for LPNs, especially in the middle of the country, but the postings are mostly in nursing homes, doctor’s offices and long-term care facilities. Such jobs are less prestigious and lower paying than hospital jobs, and are less likely to offer opportunities for advancement

    Less prestigious? According to who?

    And last time I checked, I make way more than my fellow LPNs who work in the hospital. I believe the same goes for RNs, but I can't be sure.

    Did the author do any research? I agree with the "there's no nursing shortage" sentiment, obviously. But this is just lazy, hack writing.
    Once again, love your post. My first LTC position as an RN, I made $26/hr. 2 of my fellow classmates started right away in the ED of a midsized hospital and make $23/hr. And I REALLY take issue with the phrase "less prestigious." It is not less less prestigious, it is VIEWED that way by many. I have SAVED LIVES in LTC by my assessment skills. Shaking my head.
    NMGirlRN and BrandonLPN like this.
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    Quote from SleeepyRN
    Once again, love your post. My first LTC position as an RN, I made $26/hr. 2 of my fellow classmates started right away in the ED of a midsized hospital and make $23/hr. And I REALLY take issue with the phrase "less prestigious." It is not less less prestigious, it is VIEWED that way by many. I have SAVED LIVES in LTC by my assessment skills. Shaking my head.
    Have said it before, and shall say it again; many are going to have to readjust their thinking of LTC/Rehab etc... as in many local healthcare markets such places may be the only areas of growth for nurse hiring.

    For various reasons inpatient census counts are going down with one of the primary being the push to get and or keep persons out of "expensive" hospital care. What began as a trend of moving *sicker* patients off units and onto floors is now expanding to moving them out of the hospital all together. These patients are going home or to LTC/Rehab but they aren't staying in hospital any longer than necessary. Least if those paying (insurance, Medicare, Medicaid) have any say in matters.

    Again the fact that in many local areas such as NYC nursing programs send their students to LTC for clinical experience should tell something.
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    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Have said it before, and shall say it again; many are going to have to readjust their thinking of LTC/Rehab etc... as in many local healthcare markets such places may be the only areas of growth for nurse hiring.

    For various reasons inpatient census counts are going down with one of the primary being the push to get and or keep persons out of "expensive" hospital care. What began as a trend of moving *sicker* patients off units and onto floors is now expanding to moving them out of the hospital all together. These patients are going home or to LTC/Rehab but they aren't staying in hospital any longer than necessary. Least if those paying (insurance, Medicare, Medicaid) have any say in matters.

    Again the fact that in many local areas such as NYC nursing programs send their students to LTC for clinical experience should tell something.
    *** Our medical director, a physican who is very involved in health care policy in our state, oftens shares his opinions on this subject with us. He is convinced that eventualy hospitals will only have intensive care / stepdown type of patients and ERs. Everyone else will be taken care of in out patient or skilled nursing type of enviroments.
    jtmarcy12 likes this.


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