Nursing skills in demand despite recession - page 3

Layoffs, business closings and dismal financial forecasts dominate the news. Many once-strong economic sectors are in critical condition, yet the prognosis for the nursing job market is not only... Read More

  1. Visit  ez2000 profile page
    1
    Quote from mbarn08
    ok, here is my question to all of the nurses who lived in the past tight markets as nurses.... was that market created because of a saturation of nursing students going to nursing school??? were their 100s of 1000s of people attempting to become nurses and were there as many schools in this country cranking out as many soon to be nurses as it is now???? i cannot believe there was a time when everyone and his brother or sister went to nursing school. i have yet to run into a single person who is not trying to go to nursing school. there is no way the 80s was full of people trying to be nurses thus bringing about the nursing market of the 90s. no way! in fact, i recall an instructor stating that in the 80s nursing schools were being shut down due to lack of interest. the 90s got better because nurses who had licenses in the 90s decided to work in a different career or stay home (spouses were making money in the 90s), thus opening up positions for newer nurses.

    there never was a shortage (there has always been and always will be enough licensed nurses to work...). plus, it does not matter if baby boomers will need more services, they are not going to retire in the next 5 years because many have had his/her savings whipped out. the problem with this tight market is that *if* it turns around any time soon (i am doubtful about 6 months as one person spouted.. my employers for the first time did not hire nurse externs), our wages will drop significantly. it will be the only way to justify taking on more employees. right now wages are stagnant... soon they will drop due to an oversupply compared with demand.
    this is the most realistic quote i was able to read. thanks for giving opening us into reality...tough world!
    lindarn likes this.
  2. Visit  oramar profile page
    2
    Quote from mbarn08
    ok, here is my question to all of the nurses who lived in the past tight markets as nurses.... was that market created because of a saturation of nursing students going to nursing school??? were their 100s of 1000s of people attempting to become nurses and were there as many schools in this country cranking out as many soon to be nurses as it is now???? i cannot believe there was a time when everyone and his brother or sister went to nursing school. i have yet to run into a single person who is not trying to go to nursing school. there is no way the 80s was full of people trying to be nurses thus bringing about the nursing market of the 90s. no way! in fact, i recall an instructor stating that in the 80s nursing schools were being shut down due to lack of interest. the 90s got better because nurses who had licenses in the 90s decided to work in a different career or stay home (spouses were making money in the 90s), thus opening up positions for newer nurses.

    there never was a shortage (there has always been and always will be enough licensed nurses to work...). plus, it does not matter if baby boomers will need more services, they are not going to retire in the next 5 years because many have had his/her savings whipped out. the problem with this tight market is that *if* it turns around any time soon (i am doubtful about 6 months as one person spouted.. my employers for the first time did not hire nurse externs), our wages will drop significantly. it will be the only way to justify taking on more employees. right now wages are stagnant... soon they will drop due to an oversupply compared with demand.
    i can tell you from previous experience that other tight job markets were due to employers cutting back and laying off nurses. at the same time people who had licenses and were not using them(because it is not exactly a fun job) came back into nursing because a spouse lost a job. then as now there were enough licensed people to fill the jobs before the downturn. that business about the "great nursing shortage" was never about numbers of people licensed it was about the numbers of people willing to work. that hype you heard was really healthcare management feeding a bunch of baloney to the newsmedia and goverment in order to keep a steady supply of new grads to replace the people that just up and walked away. now that they don't want you and don't need you that is to bad as far as they are concerned.
    Multicollinearity and lindarn like this.
  3. Visit  AZ_LPN_8_26_13 profile page
    1
    Quote from mariposabella
    I wish I hadnt wasted $22,000 on studying hospitality management and I didnt even finish! Im 1000% I want to do nursing though. Hospitality/Tourism is a waste of a degree.

    IMO hospitality/tourism is one of those things that you really don't need a college degree for. Most of the people I personally know in that business just went into it right after high school and started from the bottom up. You really can't do that with nursing - nursing's one of those things where you have to be a college grad. I know what you mean though - I spent a lot of time and money getting a B.S. degree in a field that I'm no longer working in myself. It will still do me good though, as I have the option when I'm an R.N. to take a "bridge program" at a local university to get my MSN without having to go to four more years of university. So it wasn't a total waste.
    lindarn likes this.
  4. Visit  sunray12 profile page
    1
    Quote from mbarn08
    ok, here is my question to all of the nurses who lived in the past tight markets as nurses.... was that market created because of a saturation of nursing students going to nursing school??? were their 100s of 1000s of people attempting to become nurses and were there as many schools in this country cranking out as many soon to be nurses as it is now???? i cannot believe there was a time when everyone and his brother or sister went to nursing school. i have yet to run into a single person who is not trying to go to nursing school. there is no way the 80s was full of people trying to be nurses thus bringing about the nursing market of the 90s. no way! in fact, i recall an instructor stating that in the 80s nursing schools were being shut down due to lack of interest. the 90s got better because nurses who had licenses in the 90s decided to work in a different career or stay home (spouses were making money in the 90s), thus opening up positions for newer nurses.

    there never was a shortage (there has always been and always will be enough licensed nurses to work...). plus, it does not matter if baby boomers will need more services, they are not going to retire in the next 5 years because many have had his/her savings whipped out. the problem with this tight market is that *if* it turns around any time soon (i am doubtful about 6 months as one person spouted.. my employers for the first time did not hire nurse externs), our wages will drop significantly. it will be the only way to justify taking on more employees. right now wages are stagnant... soon they will drop due to an oversupply compared with demand.
    i wasn't a nurse during the previous tight markets but i was around and yes at least in my work place there were always people looking at going to nursing school. i live in a teaching hospital town where the biggest employer is the university health system so that might be a bit different but when you think of it - there's usually a university health system in most cities and towns and there are have always been people looking to work for them. their reputation for offering steady "recession proof" employment plays a big part in it.

    the other issue is the money - not the fact that there are too many people in nursing school. if nurses were cheaper they would be getting hired. instead it is the cna's/techs that are getting hired on the spot not the rn's.

    nursing wages have sky rocketed over the past 20 years and it should be no surprise that employers in belt tightening mode have to scale back for a while. this doesn't mean there is no shortage. it simply means that hospitals don't have the budget to take on a class of new grads and train them right now. hospitals and other nursing facilities have not stopped hiring nurses - they are just not looking to spend 3-6 months training people right now. there is a difference.

    saying that there is no shortage because x-amount of people out there have licenses is not a good argument. maybe there are enough people in your household to pick farmer junco's crops down the road but if your family is not interested in doing this kind of work then you are not his potential employees and he has to look elsewhere.

    there are a lot of people seeking to go into nursing right now because they've heard about the six-figure salaries - especially for travel nurses. nurses haven't always made this kind of money. everyone (myself included) could use more money and i see quite a few people on this board who think nurses don't make enough - but you have to ask yourself whether the industry can sustain itself paying what you think is enough. yes - everyone needs care but how many are going to opt to pay 55 bucks/hour for it - if they can pay 9 bucks (for a cna) instead? the doctor and lawyer salary bubble already popped long ago. i saw a flyer some place in town last summer inviting nurses to to sign up and make up to 150k. i knew then that there was a bubble and it was about to pop.
    lindarn likes this.
  5. Visit  AZ_LPN_8_26_13 profile page
    2
    Some of us are not really interested in the "six-figure salary" thing..... I privately refer to this phenomenon as the "gold rush mentality" that some Americans have, and will always have. Back in the 1980s and it was IT, and anything computer-related. In the 1990's it was real-estate. Many of us just want a somewhat stable job, where the bottom won't totally drop out of it and it's totally gone, combined with something that makes a real difference to society and it's care (healing and helping professions are just one example). Making enough to feed, cloth, and shelter your family adequately would be nice too. You don't need a six-figure salary to do that.

    Like I mentioned in another thread specifically about "Is there really a nursing shortage?" it depends on where you live and what sort of nursing you will be going into. No, there isn't a nursing shortage everywhere. And yes, people are going to try to get by as cheap as possible, no matter what - that's just human nature - you and I do it every day ourselves when we grocery-shop, buy gas, etc etc. Many people just automatically assume right now that anyone's motivation for signing on for nursing school is to make more money - I can assure you that that's not true. I've made my share of big money in the past, with everything that comes with it. I'm taking a bit different path this time.
    westcoastgirl and lindarn like this.
  6. Visit  CapeCodMermaid profile page
    3
    I graduated with a BA in the '70s during a recession. Couldn't get a job. hmmmm I think I'll go to nursing school. So I did, graduated at the top of my class. Hospital around here wasn't hiring. I got a job (and don't ask how with no experience) for a nursing agency. Got a private duty job at the hospital for a woman in a coma...right place right time..got hired and the rest, as they say, is history. You might not always get the job you want, but usually you will find a job in nursing somewhere.
  7. Visit  AZ_LPN_8_26_13 profile page
    0
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    I graduated with a BA in the '70s during a recession. Couldn't get a job. hmmmm I think I'll go to nursing school. So I did, graduated at the top of my class. Hospital around here wasn't hiring. I got a job (and don't ask how with no experience) for a nursing agency. Got a private duty job at the hospital for a woman in a coma...right place right time..got hired and the rest, as they say, is history. You might not always get the job you want, but usually you will find a job in nursing somewhere.

    I'm counting on my previous educational experience to help me out somewhat when I get to the point of continuing my education after I start working as a nurse. I managed to get a B.S. in a technical field but have taken lots of humanities courses as well, that plus just plain good old life experience (always under-rated here in America)....

    Pre-nursing where I'm going now was the first exposure I've ever had to medical/clinical related classes, and so far I haven't done too badly (GPA 3.69 & almost finished). Nursing really is chock full of opportunity compared to some other fields I've been associated with. Right now I'm open to a lot of different potential career paths - I think that no matter what you do, it's best to start out with a generalist type of med education, then later as you become more knowledgable about things, and have more ability to decide where you'd fit in best, then specialize in this or that. Like you mentioned, some of this will depend on being in the right place at the right time too......
  8. Visit  lovethepeople profile page
    0
    I was just licensed last month (yay!) and have been looking for work and am discouraged already. YES, I knew the new grad market was very, very tight, especially here in Northern California and other desired urban areas. Just really miss being with patients and families! Because I really did go into this for the love of it!
  9. Visit  sn2brtrd profile page
    0
    Hey Out There!!!! When will the US recognize the military medical training and experience? And I'm not talking about core classes! When will our years of experience be recognized by any civilian entity? Haven't we signed the dotted line in part to stand up for this country? I've been an Air Force enlisted medic for 20 years, with experience from clinical to Med ICU. I've dedicated my life to this career. I do believe there may be some academic information I must acquire, but not a degree's worth of schooling! In order to continue my nursing profession at the level I am used to performing I must bow down to the civilian educational system and begin at square 1. It is unbelievable that our 'civilian' sect won't give us any credit for the high quality care we are trained to provide to our military beneficiaries. I suggest our Commander in Chief and all state nursing board organizations review enlisted military training and at the least, implement performance based testing for clinical procedures and management. To institute this recognition would not only expedite the availability of experienced nursing professionals into the workforce, it would validate the capabilities of our military nursing services. But for now, I'll be thankful I can take the 2 year + break to attend school for free. Maybe I can even teach my classmates a thing or two! Please respond if you are experiencing similar frustrations...
  10. Visit  AZ_LPN_8_26_13 profile page
    0
    Quote from sunray12
    The other issue is the money - not the fact that there are too many people in nursing school. If nurses were cheaper they would be getting hired. Instead it is the cna's/techs that are getting hired on the spot not the RN's.
    I've just found out that I may have a chance to train and get certified as a CNA while I'm waiting for a spot to open up in nursing school. IMO this will be some good "hands-on" training for being an RN, even though it's not required to become an RN here...... Main CNA training requirement is that you must already have your NS prerequisites done, which I have.


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