Nursing service reaches higher level with doctorate

  1. 2
    nursing service reaches higher level with doctorate

    by debra erdley
    pittsburgh tribune-review
    monday, december 20, 2010


    when lisa bratton-henry graduated from the shadyside hospital school of nursing in 1986 as a registered nurse at age 19, she had no idea nurses could be "doctors."

    "never in a million years," she said.

    now a cardiology nurse practitioner, she was part of the first doctoral class in carlow university's 81-year history. she and nine others were awarded doctorate of nursing practice degrees during a ceremony friday night.
    about 120 schools nationwide offer the degree program, which was endorsed by the american association of colleges of nursing in 2006. unlike the older doctoral degree in nursing, which focuses on research as well as defining and developing theory, the doctorate in nursing practice program looks at advancing the practice of nursing and developing the profession's standing.

    carlow's program, which can be completed in 16 months, is not specifically aimed at turning out nursing faculty. however, clare hopkins, associate dean and director of the school of nursing at carlow, said there's hope some graduates will help ease the nation's critical nursing faculty shortage. in 2009, the national association said nursing schools turned away nearly 55,000 qualified applicants. two-thirds of the schools cited faculty shortages as a reason.

    carlow's first doctoral class represented a cross-section of the nursing profession, hopkins said. some were in management and administration, some in education and some, like bratton-henry, in specialty practices.
    joyouter and lindarn like this.
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  3. 84 Comments so far...

  4. 27
    This is all very nice, that nurses are seeking doctorate degrees- but when is nursing going to take the plunge and increase the entry into practice to a BSN.

    We are the least educated of all the health care professions, we are the laughing stock of the health care professions. They earn more money than we do, enjoy more prestige, and respect, and CHARGE FOR THEIR SERVICES!! Their professional services are not rolled into the room rate, the complimentary roll of toilet paper, or the houskeeping. They have their own cost center.

    Am I missing something? Are nurses thinking out side the box, to what is attainable, and doable? And truly in the best interest of the profession. All the while, our professional practice is being sold to the lowest bidder. And our professional practice is being downskilled to HS dropouts. Is it any wonder that the public cannot understand what is being missed by the minimally educated, "nurse extenders? And most of you cannot even educate the public why they need, "educated", profesisonal nurses at their bedside, not HS dropouts, because you fight unionizIng, and have no control over your practice!

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    MyGenesis, Ayvah, green33, and 24 others like this.
  5. 9
    The usual PR "puff piece." That and $1.00 will get you a cup of coffee ...
    SharonH, RN, keldorn, mdfog10, and 6 others like this.
  6. 13
    And the ever-present drivel out of the nursing schools about the "nation's critical nursing faculty shortage."

    Thank heavens that 55,000 qualified candidates were unable to matriculate into nursing schools in 2009 due to a lack of faculty... that's 55,000 fewer new grads to be fighting over the scraps.

    I agree with Linda, however... I'd prefer to see more attention to raising the appallingly low minimum standards-of-entry than to creating doctor-nurses.
    DC Collins, ToxicShock, KeyMaster, and 10 others like this.
  7. 4
    "Unlike the older doctoral degree in nursing, which focuses on research as well as defining and developing theory, the doctorate in nursing practice program looks at advancing the practice of nursing and developing the profession's standing."

    i.e. you don't learn anything useful but you get those cool letters after your name? Well, at least they are spared the wisdom of that wackadoodle Watson.
    nursejoed, coast2coast, RN1980, and 1 other like this.
  8. 4
    This is all very nice, that nurses are seeking doctorate degrees- but when is nursing going to take the plunge and increase the entry into practice to a BSN.
    This is already well underway in many parts of the country. In my corner of the world (SE PA), there are very few institutions that will hire new-grad associate degree RNs and some are requiring ADN-RNs presently on staff to get their BSN as a condition of continued employment. The days of associate degree and diploma program RNs are clearly numbered.

    Despite that obvious trend, there are at least six Junior, Community College and diploma programs in the Phila area that are at capacity and continue to churn out RNs that may turn out to be unemployable. Given the present job market, the fact that a shortage of nursing faculty has resulted in 55,000 less nurses would not seem to be particularly bad news.
    KeyMaster, Lovely_RN, cherryames1949, and 1 other like this.
  9. 2
    you certainly hit the mark with your post lindarn.
    cherryames1949 and lindarn like this.
  10. 8
    It is not the fault of the student that there are still diploma and ADN programs. This topic has been on the table for about 40 years. It's the indecisiveness of the nursing community. (sigh)

    I have always wondered who wants to pay 30-80 THOUSAND dollars for an education to work nights, weekends, holidays, mandatory overtime, etc., doing all the physical labor and taking all the disrespect?

    Which nurses RUN for the door to higher education when the doctors yell at them, the pts or family members make demands, or after they miss a family occassion?

    And who stays in the trenches?
    ok2bme, kcmylorn, joyouter, and 5 others like this.
  11. 3
    I agree that the educational standard for entry to practice needs to be raised. But I don't understand your post, Merlee. Are you suggesting that nurses who seek graduate-level education do so to avoid, as you put it, being in the trenches?
    mdfog10, JacobK, and lindarn like this.
  12. 5
    Quote from lindarn
    This is all very nice, that nurses are seeking doctorate degrees- but when is nursing going to take the plunge and increase the entry into practice to a BSN.

    We are the least educated of all the health care professions, we are the laughing stock of the health care professions. They earn more money than we do, enjoy more prestige, and respect, and CHARGE FOR THEIR SERVICES!! Their professional services are not rolled into the room rate, the complimentary roll of toilet paper, or the houskeeping. They have their own cost center.

    Am I missing something? Are nurses thinking out side the box, to what is attainable, and doable? And truly in the best interest of the profession. All the while, our professional practice is being sold to the lowest bidder. And our professional practice is being downskilled to HS dropouts. Is it any wonder that the public cannot understand what is being missed by the minimally educated, "nurse extenders? And most of you cannot even educate the public why they need, "educated", profesisonal nurses at their bedside, not HS dropouts, because you fight unionizIng, and have no control over your practice!

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    It would be nice if the state colleges would accept more students for BSN but with the economy right now, students are just happy to get accepted to the college in general. Every year it seems state colleges are cutting down classes and the amount of students they accept and then raising the amount for tuition. At Sac State, my friend got accepted after much uncertainty, and then from there, he was finally able to get accepted into their BSN program. I don't believe they were going to accept those who weren't already Sac State students like they did in the past before this whole economic mess came about.

    I guess it stung a bit when you said the nursing profession is being handed to HS dropouts... I know you didn't specifically say or mean that all current nursing students are HS dropouts but it just kind of irked me. I don't think there's any problem with a HS dropout wanting to better their life. I feel it's an unfair, somewhat elitist thing to say about HS dropouts is all. I'm not sure if you meant it that way or not, hopefully not I know I can't be alone in feeling this way.

    I work at a local hospital and a lot of my friends there who are nurses or are going into nursing were HS graduates, as well as I. Although, I do know a lot of nursing students who want that ADN and will be happy there. Not me though, one day, I want my doctorate in nursing, maybe teach one day! And no, I will not eat my young So before I or anybody else who shares my dream want to embark on this journey, it would be nice to get our foot in the door and get that ADN first if BSN isn't available. (I just got in after four years of waiting so I'm still doing my happy dance )

    Also, an example of an allied health profession that makes less money than nursing but still has to go through a two year program are rad techs. In the state of CA, median hourly wage for RN is 40.22 while it's 30.43 for rad techs according to labor market info on CA EDD website. Least educated? What about medical assistants, phlebotomists, nurse's aides, ER techs, respiratory therapists, etc? They may not make as much but they don't have to go through as much schooling. I still don't think they're the butt of jokes around the hospital. Just us housekeepers j/k

    Again, I can only speak about the area that I live in, but being an RN here, you are most definitely not the laughing stock, you do have lots of prestige and for the most part, nurses are actually respected by other people :redpinkhe
    PMFB-RN, ohioSICUrn, kanzi monkey, and 2 others like this.


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