Nursing Schools Turned Away more than 32,000 Applicants due to Capacity Constraints

  1. from pa nurses enews:

    nursing schools forced to turn away more than 32,000 applicants in 2005

    enrollment in entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs increased 13% in 2005, but nursing colleges and universities were forced to turn away 32,617 qualified applicants due to capacity constraints, according to preliminary data released yesterday by the american association of colleges of nursing.

    "despite the successful efforts of schools nationwide to expand student capacity, our nations nursing schools are falling far short of meeting the current and projected demand for rns," said aacn president jean bartels. the federal government projects a shortfall of 800,000 registered nurses by the year 2020.

    pamela thompson, ceo of the american organization of nurse executives, said, "this data from aacn is troubling for all of us. we desperately need to increase the number of students graduating from baccalaureate programs, but the constraints on schools to accomplish this seem to be increasing. the shortage of faculty and limits to capacity could cripple our ability to graduate enough nurses to meet our future needs. we must continue to search for multiple solutions to this growing problem." aone is an aha subsidiary.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Dec 17, '05
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    I think part of the problem is related to attracting and retaining qualified nursing instructors. Only 2 percent of all RNs in America hold masters' degrees and most of these highly-educated nurses will not work for low pay as nursing school instructors.

    In my opinion, schools would attract and keep many more good nursing instructors if only they offered better pay and benefits. But since there's a shortage of qualified instructors, this will continue to translate into a shortage of qualified practicing nurses.
  4. by   FocusRN
    Ithink that this problem can in part can be solved by a few things. First, widening the use of distance education, both preceptor like programs such as Deacconess, and programs that utilize live video, that broadcast to multiple sites, in addition to that those programs should get adjunct faculty at hospitals that are willing to contract them. This won't solve the shortage program, but it will help. My 2 cents.
  5. by   SFCardiacRN
    The shortage has sure been good to my paycheck!
  6. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I think part of the problem is related to attracting and retaining qualified nursing instructors. Only 2 percent of all RNs in America hold masters' degrees and most of these highly-educated nurses will not work for low pay as nursing school instructors.

    In my opinion, schools would attract and keep many more good nursing instructors if only they offered better pay and benefits. But since there's a shortage of qualified instructors, this will continue to translate into a shortage of qualified practicing nurses.
    And you can't blame them. I agree with your post.

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