Nursing schools turn students away - page 8

As the local health care industry faces a looming nursing shortage for the second time in as many decades, area nursing programs say they are having to turn away dozens of well-qualified students. ... Read More

  1. by   mnj0105
    I am taking my pre req's now. My school's nursing program admits on a point system. It goes by where you live in relation to the campus, an aptitude test, and grades. I am working my butt off because there are only 80 spots and I want one of them!
  2. by   destiny5
    Quote from NiceNurse2b19
    Another way to 'help fix nursing shortage' is to try to give up 'weeding out'. No student goes to fail. Especially if they are lotto winners; you would think they would aim at KEEPING THEM IN THE PROGRAM... NOT setting them up for failure and discouraging them...
    Agreed. What's up with the weeding out process? If you admit the top 30 students out of 3 to 4 hundred students, then why oh why do you constantly graduate only about 6 students a semester. They should put penalties on these schools that graduate less than 15% of their students. I bet they would then figure out a way to help students that may be "falling behind" and yes, there may be a few that can't cut it, but I believe it's mostly the fault of the programs themselves. Nursing school is very time consuming ect..ect.. but I find it hard to believe that only 15% of your top 5-10% of applicants are actually good enough to graduate. The system is flawed.
  3. by   ASN24
    i am very aware that class sizes dwindle down, i know that many people find that this isnt for them or dont have the study habits to make it thru school. Everyone that i have talked to seems to think that out of a SENIOR class that is suppose to graduate, there should be more than 25% of them passing the theory, and a nursing instructor even said that by this point, most of the one's who arent going to make it have either flunked out or moved on and that there is always a few people who don't make it at the end but that it shouldnt be less than 10 of 39 people
  4. by   magikRN
    The school I went to runs their nursing program with accepting students 40 into two fall starting and one spring starting semesters. They have both day and evening classes and take 40 students per program. they have the best reputation in our area and they are a community college with a AD program. they also have a LVN program, and another LPN program in the next county. The waiting list is about two years long last I heard, but that was two years ago. They also have agreements with several other universities so any of their graduates can be accepted into the BSN programs. I have finished the prereq for the BSN program and hope to start their online program soon. I eventually want to get my MSN and teach. one instructor stated that if they had a few more teachers they would be able to expand the program but they are having a hard time recruiting instructors. I live in a state that is hard hit right now with the nursing shortage. At our health system they have increased the extra shift bonus, but we have been having so much mandatory holdovers that more people are leaving every day. Something has to change and soon.
  5. by   Halinja
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    But the nursing department gets as much as the art department that teaches basket weaving......
    Not to diss the arts, as art is important, but one of the problems is that on the same amount of funding the nursing department has to hire more instructors per capita, as clinicals require a low student to teacher ratio. You can fit 60 people in basket weaving.

    Someone already mentioned it, but in comparison to what you can make with an upper level degree in nursing out in healthcare, salary levels for instructors are abysmal. Who on earth would take that kind of cut! Makes it pretty hard to recruit qualified, competent staff.
  6. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from caroladybelle
    That so-called Fast Track program is in association w/HCA hospitals.

    HCA is a ForProfit chain, that has some of the poorest pay and conditions in the Country. They are also a major sponsor of GroupOne in Texas. Why is it I picture iron clad contracts/servitude in the picture?
    Considering the corporate atmosphere of HCA, how long will it take their accountants and other administrative honchos to decide that they have all the RNs they need, and the majority of the work now being done by RNs can be turned over to Patient Care Technicians under the supervision of one of those Doctor/RNs?
  7. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from destiny5
    Agreed. What's up with the weeding out process? If you admit the top 30 students out of 3 to 4 hundred students, then why oh why do you constantly graduate only about 6 students a semester. They should put penalties on these schools that graduate less than 15% of their students. I bet they would then figure out a way to help students that may be "falling behind" and yes, there may be a few that can't cut it, but I believe it's mostly the fault of the programs themselves. Nursing school is very time consuming ect..ect.. but I find it hard to believe that only 15% of your top 5-10% of applicants are actually good enough to graduate. The system is flawed.
    Perhaps one reason the system for educating nurses is flawed is because the leaders of the profession are unable to come up with a good definition of what nurses need to know to be able to do the actual jobs they are hired to perform. The present system is very wasteful of people, time, space in schools, and money if it is judged by any standard ROI (Return on Investment) principles. When so few students graduate from a program then take and pass the NCLEX, and even fewer are still working in nursing five years later, something is very wrong!

    How long will it take for a big corporate chain of hospitals to decide that they can devise their own system for training the healthcare workers they need and hire only a few token RNs for supervisory positions?
    Last edit by Retired R.N. on Nov 15, '06
  8. by   santhony44
    Quote from Halinja
    Not to diss the arts, as art is important, but one of the problems is that on the same amount of funding the nursing department has to hire more instructors per capita, as clinicals require a low student to teacher ratio. You can fit 60 people in basket weaving.

    Someone already mentioned it, but in comparison to what you can make with an upper level degree in nursing out in healthcare, salary levels for instructors are abysmal. Who on earth would take that kind of cut! Makes it pretty hard to recruit qualified, competent staff.
    I agree that this is a big part of the problem. If you have a Master's or PhD in, say, English, teaching at the college level is probably pretty close to the best you're going to do as far as pay is concerned. Nursing instructor salaries don't even come close to what an RN is capable of doing. I have a Master's degree. I applied to teach at a community college and was very enthusiastic until I found that I would take a 50% pay cut! Well, no, thank you! I don't just work for the fun of it. Oh, and they made it very clear that you are not allowed to have any outside jobs.

    I did actually teach, at a 4-year institution, and the pay was decent but not outstanding. I taught one year. Being on faculty is also not my idea of a good time. Way too "political."

    People who run colleges and universities tend to be academics. They really seem to see no reason at all to pay nursing instructors more than instructors in any other department.

    I don't know how this will get changed. I just read an ad yesterday for a community college nursing instructor. They require a Master's degree. The top pay for this position: $44,000.

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