Nursing schools turn students away - page 6

As the local health care industry faces a looming nursing shortage for the second time in as many decades, area nursing programs say they are having to turn away dozens of well-qualified students. ... Read More

  1. by   lector
    can anyone help me find infos bout hospitals in the us who would like to train student nurses and provide them the security of employment/job?Wanna be an scholar!thnx in advance>>>>>>>>>>>>>
  2. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from lector
    can anyone help me find infos bout hospitals in the us who would like to train student nurses and provide them the security of employment/job?Wanna be an scholar!thnx in advance>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Hi lector. If you are talking about diploma nursing, there's not many more that exist.

    If you are already a student nurse, many hospitals will hire you as a PCT (patient care tech). Once you graduate, and pass the NCLEX, many of them will keep you on as an RN or LVN/LPN in their facility.

    Good luck to you.
  3. by   kittycare
    WELL HERE IS MY TWO CENTS...I TOO HAVE BEEN ON A WAITING LIST FOR ALMOST 2 YEARS...I WENT TO A LVN SCHOOL WHILE I AM WAITNG FOR MY TURN TO START THE RN PROGRAM IN MY CITY(LOS ANGELES). WHAT IS WRONG WITH THESES PROGRAMS IS THAT THERE ARE NO TEACHERS..WHEN I STARTED THE LVN PROGRAM WE WERE 40 AND OF THOSE 40, 10 WERE ALTERNATESWE HAD ONLY ONE TEACER TO TEACH,AND DUE CLINICALS. ALTOUGH WE WERE PROMISED AND 2ND CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR WE DID NOT GET ONE UNTIL THE 3RD SEMESTER AND THE INSTRUCTORS DIVED-UP THE CLASS ASSIGNMENTS AND IT WAS HARD TO FOLLOW. SO MOST OF MY LEARNING WAS ON MY OWN...I FINALLY GRADUATED (TX GOD)THIS AUGT. AND AWAITNG MY ATT LETTER. BUT YES THERE NEEDS TO BE MORE INCENTIVES FOR THE INSTRUCTOR B/C AN RN WORKING P/T(SAY 3 DAYS A WEEK) EARNS MORE THEN A TEACHER WOULD..:angryfire WORKING A 5 DAY WEEK, AND THAT DOES N'T INCLUDE THE HRS TO PREPARE THE CLASS ASSIGNMENT AND OBJECTIVES. THATS WHY WE HAVE ACME TEACHERS...THEY ONLY WORK PERDIUM...I NEED TO PAY A BILL, NEED FOR A NEW REFRIGERATOR..ECT...THEY DON'T STAY AROUND LONG ENOUGH . THE WAITING LIST IN INCREDIBLE TO GET INTO AN ACCREDITED NURSING SCHOOL, AND THE GPA IS THRU THE ROOF.. I GRADUATED WITH A 4,O FROM COLLEGE AND STILL BY THE SKIDS OF TEETH I GOT INTO THE NURSING PROGRAM...IT IS REDICULOUS...DO THEY NEED MORE NURSES OR NOT?
  4. by   NurseLatteDNP
    Quote from Kay28
    Are all nursing schools having to turn students away? are community colleges any better?
    Kay, in my community college they admitted 110 students, but over 450 have applied. They have told us that we would have a better chance of getting in the BSN program because there is a shorter waiting list. I waited "only" 1 year to get in after I finished the prerequisites.
    I think our teachers are there because they love their job and the students. All my nursing teachers work in hospitals over the weekend. They are all such great, compassionate people and I am glad they chose teaching.
  5. by   MissJoRN
    Quote from lector
    can anyone help me find infos bout hospitals in the us who would like to train student nurses and provide them the security of employment/job?Wanna be an scholar!thnx in advance>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Some hospitals do have tuition re-imbursment or arrangments with local colleges that do clinicals there for staff going to nursing school... IF you can handle work and school at the same time. One hospital I worked at had 100% undergrad re-imbursment for FT staff, and a percentage for part timers. This is not the same as a diploma school at all. I went to a diploma school, paid my own way (we all did, even the employees of the sponsering hospital) and then my soon to graduate class was not invited (we were flat out told we weren't welcome) to the hospital's RN job fair (it was "for RNs only NOT student nurses and NOT GNs"... needless to say, I went somewhere else!)
    Different hospitals have different benefit... look into websites and HR departments locally. Good Luck!
  6. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from kittycare
    WELL HERE IS MY TWO CENTS...I TOO HAVE BEEN ON A WAITING LIST FOR ALMOST 2 YEARS...I WENT TO A LVN SCHOOL WHILE I AM WAITNG FOR MY TURN TO START THE RN PROGRAM IN MY CITY(LOS ANGELES). WHAT IS WRONG WITH THESES PROGRAMS IS THAT THERE ARE NO TEACHERS..WHEN I STARTED THE LVN PROGRAM WE WERE 40 AND OF THOSE 40, 10 WERE ALTERNATESWE HAD ONLY ONE TEACER TO TEACH,AND DUE CLINICALS. ALTOUGH WE WERE PROMISED AND 2ND CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR WE DID NOT GET ONE UNTIL THE 3RD SEMESTER AND THE INSTRUCTORS DIVED-UP THE CLASS ASSIGNMENTS AND IT WAS HARD TO FOLLOW. SO MOST OF MY LEARNING WAS ON MY OWN...I FINALLY GRADUATED (TX GOD)THIS AUGT. AND AWAITNG MY ATT LETTER. BUT YES THERE NEEDS TO BE MORE INCENTIVES FOR THE INSTRUCTOR B/C AN RN WORKING P/T(SAY 3 DAYS A WEEK) EARNS MORE THEN A TEACHER WOULD..:angryfire WORKING A 5 DAY WEEK, AND THAT DOES N'T INCLUDE THE HRS TO PREPARE THE CLASS ASSIGNMENT AND OBJECTIVES. THATS WHY WE HAVE ACME TEACHERS...THEY ONLY WORK PERDIUM...I NEED TO PAY A BILL, NEED FOR A NEW REFRIGERATOR..ECT...THEY DON'T STAY AROUND LONG ENOUGH . THE WAITING LIST IN INCREDIBLE TO GET INTO AN ACCREDITED NURSING SCHOOL, AND THE GPA IS THRU THE ROOF.. I GRADUATED WITH A 4,O FROM COLLEGE AND STILL BY THE SKIDS OF TEETH I GOT INTO THE NURSING PROGRAM...IT IS REDICULOUS...DO THEY NEED MORE NURSES OR NOT?
    Sure they need more nurses, but NOT NEARLY as much as they need more nursing instructors. It wouldn't do too much good to admit more students if they didn't have adequate faculty to supervise them in the clinical setting. Let's face it, people aren't exactly lining up around the block to get their MSNs/PHDs so they can earn less money than a staff nurse. All my nursing professors worked either as nurses or NPs as well. They had to! Their earnings as associate professors were pitiful. Just another example of how education is NOT rewarded in nursing.
  7. by   kittycare
    Ooh! I Totally Agree, The Need For More Professors Is The Culperate And That Is Outrageous. And They Have Not Made It Rewarding Enough To Stimulate/attraactive For Nurses To Sign-up For.but With All The Nurses That Are Going To Be Retireing Those Schools/lausd Should Starting Raising The Insentives To Teach/instruct.... The Lausd Is Always Hireing-clinical Instructors
    Tx For Ur Reply...u Understand What I Said.kc
  8. by   Gramme
    Wow, I have read all of the postings, and I am not sure I have read one from an instructor yet. I am a Professor of Nursing at a Community College and I graduated in 1979 from and ADN program, 1984 with a BSN and 1994 with my MSN with a CNS in Pedi. I have taught part time for over 10 years in some capacity or another because I really do believe in giving back to my profession.

    This year I went full time. I have 26 years of nursing experience ( in just about every capacity except CNO) and 10 years of teaching. I was offered 35,000.00 for a 9 month contract. In addition, I was given a 7,000.00 stipend for the year to make up for my experience and education. That totals 42,000 for 9 mos. (which I chose to take over 12).

    Calculate that amount and I am sure not many of you would like to live with that budget.

    I can tell you from my experience that my co workers are much in the same frame of mind I am. They do what they do because of a commitment to the profession- to leave something behind.

    Our responsiblities include 15 + hours every week of clinical, + development of lectures, meetings, and student counseling (minimum of 6 hours a week). We are expected to be in our offices from 8-5 on the days we do not have clinical. In addition, many of us grade papers (CARE PLANS!!!) at home at night and on the weekends.

    My brother is a Professor of Bus. Ad. at another University in another state. He teaches 3 courses/week. (total of 10 hours of lecture a week). He is paid 60,000.00 / 9 mon. contract for his experience. He has been teaching for 15 years.

    There is a great disparity concerning the amount of work nursing instructors put in vs. other subject instructors. Not many people want to submit themselves to what we do, and if they do it, they burn out quickly.

    The program I teach for has lost 2 instructors this semester. We are already short 2 positions, and it looks like we may have to cancel the enrollment of our Spring Class becaue of a shortage of instructors. Many of us are being pulled from our courses to teach above or below our level to help with different rotations.

    To put it mildly, it's a mess, and without a significant change- THERE WILL BE LESS OPPORTUNITY TO GRADUATE RN's not more in the immediate future.

    I am not always in favor of throwing money at a problem to fix it, but this is one situation where Money is the answer. Administrators need to raise salaries immediately to improve our staffing. That is the only way to fix this.

    I really belive in the old adage- you get what you pay for. I work with a wonderful group of educators that are committed to their students. But I have seen low functioning educators that teach because they can't do the task anymore. They feel they can hide in education. They eventually get found out and leave, but not before the damage is done.

    Thank you for taking on this topic. It helps to know that there are RN's out there that care that we can't graduate staff because there is no one to teach them. Maybe we should be writing letters to our legislators to bug them into assisting us with change that is meaningful.
  9. by   VickyRN
    Quote from teachernurse
    Wow, I have read all of the postings, and I am not sure I have read one from an instructor yet. I am a Professor of Nursing at a Community College and I graduated in 1979 from and ADN program, 1984 with a BSN and 1994 with my MSN with a CNS in Pedi. I have taught part time for over 10 years in some capacity or another because I really do believe in giving back to my profession.

    This year I went full time. I have 26 years of nursing experience ( in just about every capacity except CNO) and 10 years of teaching. I was offered 35,000.00 for a 9 month contract. In addition, I was given a 7,000.00 stipend for the year to make up for my experience and education. That totals 42,000 for 9 mos. (which I chose to take over 12).

    Calculate that amount and I am sure not many of you would like to live with that budget.

    I can tell you from my experience that my co workers are much in the same frame of mind I am. They do what they do because of a commitment to the profession- to leave something behind.

    Our responsiblities include 15 + hours every week of clinical, + development of lectures, meetings, and student counseling (minimum of 6 hours a week). We are expected to be in our offices from 8-5 on the days we do not have clinical. In addition, many of us grade papers (CARE PLANS!!!) at home at night and on the weekends.

    My brother is a Professor of Bus. Ad. at another University in another state. He teaches 3 courses/week. (total of 10 hours of lecture a week). He is paid 60,000.00 / 9 mon. contract for his experience. He has been teaching for 15 years.

    There is a great disparity concerning the amount of work nursing instructors put in vs. other subject instructors. Not many people want to submit themselves to what we do, and if they do it, they burn out quickly.

    The program I teach for has lost 2 instructors this semester. We are already short 2 positions, and it looks like we may have to cancel the enrollment of our Spring Class becaue of a shortage of instructors. Many of us are being pulled from our courses to teach above or below our level to help with different rotations.

    To put it mildly, it's a mess, and without a significant change- THERE WILL BE LESS OPPORTUNITY TO GRADUATE RN's not more in the immediate future.

    I am not always in favor of throwing money at a problem to fix it, but this is one situation where Money is the answer. Administrators need to raise salaries immediately to improve our staffing. That is the only way to fix this.

    I really belive in the old adage- you get what you pay for. I work with a wonderful group of educators that are committed to their students. But I have seen low functioning educators that teach because they can't do the task anymore. They feel they can hide in education. They eventually get found out and leave, but not before the damage is done.

    Thank you for taking on this topic. It helps to know that there are RN's out there that care that we can't graduate staff because there is no one to teach them. Maybe we should be writing letters to our legislators to bug them into assisting us with change that is meaningful.
    Welcome to AllNurses I am a nursing instructor in an ADN program in NC and also one of the moderators here (I co-moderate the Nursing Education Forum -please check this out). Yours is an excellent post and I thoroughly agree. The shortage of nurse faculty is becoming critical in many, many regions due to the low salaries and exhausting workloads.
  10. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Teachernurse, welcome to AllNurses.com, and thank you so much for your post.

    It really puts into perspective just how bad the situation is.
  11. by   herring_mom2
    Okay. With all of these potential nursing students being turned away, what should I do? I currently hold a Bachelor of Science in Accounting. I am a stay at home mom until my 4 year old enters kindergarten. I would like to go to nursing school to be an RN. However, the Washington Metropolitan area for nursing school is very competitive. Should I take the LPN to RN route first. Or should I go straight into a four year degree program at a four year institution. Keep in mind that it will not take me the entire four years. I have completed all prereqs with the exception of Nutrition. I have also taken all of the core courses required of a matriculating undergraduate student.

    Please someone advise me.

    Thanks in advance.
  12. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Personally, if I already had a bachelor degree, I would look into programs that are just for those with a bachelor already.

    However, you could always apply to multiple colleges/universities and see where you can get in.


    Really, it's a matter of time and money. Good luck to you!

    Quote from herring_mom2
    Okay. With all of these potential nursing students being turned away, what should I do? I currently hold a Bachelor of Science in Accounting. I am a stay at home mom until my 4 year old enters kindergarten. I would like to go to nursing school to be an RN. However, the Washington Metropolitan area for nursing school is very competitive. Should I take the LPN to RN route first. Or should I go straight into a four year degree program at a four year institution. Keep in mind that it will not take me the entire four years. I have completed all prereqs with the exception of Nutrition. I have also taken all of the core courses required of a matriculating undergraduate student.

    Please someone advise me.

    Thanks in advance.
  13. by   VickyRN
    Quote from Fun2Care
    Personally, if I already had a bachelor degree, I would look into programs that are just for those with a bachelor already.

    However, you could always apply to multiple colleges/universities and see where you can get in.


    Really, it's a matter of time and money. Good luck to you!
    Great advice - ITA. It is usually easier to get into BSN programs (less time waiting). Make many phone calls and find out just how hard it is to get into the various programs in your area and proceed from there. Best wishes to you

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