Nursing schools turn students away - page 5

As the local health care industry faces a looming nursing shortage for the second time in as many decades, area nursing programs say they are having to turn away dozens of well-qualified students. ... Read More

  1. by   hope3456
    In response to the above posting about stagnating wages, poor benefits, ect - just a guess but could it be in part due to the nursing shortage lessening - at least for the time being - until all those nurses retire? I believe that is the case in my community - you could hardly say there is a shortage. Not that I think it is right, but that is how facilities seem to decide pay - in terms of 'supply and demand.' For example, in my facility, they are now "fully staffed." I just got a memo stating that they are cutting the extra shift bonus ($50.00 for picking up an xtra shift - on top of time and 1/2). You also got this bonus if you were "on call" for a weekend - and now you don't - which i think really bites. In a couple months, I will be looking elsewhere - maybe where there is a "shortage."
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from lindarn
    How about paying nursing instructors more, to attract more grad students to chools teaching, instead of other more lucrative career paths. If the colleges can fund high profile football teams, they can pay nursing instructors more. JMHO, and $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    NO DOUBT!!!!
  3. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from hope3456
    In response to the above posting about stagnating wages, poor benefits, ect - just a guess but could it be in part due to the nursing shortage lessening - at least for the time being - until all those nurses retire? I believe that is the case in my community - you could hardly say there is a shortage. Not that I think it is right, but that is how facilities seem to decide pay - in terms of 'supply and demand.' For example, in my facility, they are now "fully staffed." I just got a memo stating that they are cutting the extra shift bonus ($50.00 for picking up an xtra shift - on top of time and 1/2). You also got this bonus if you were "on call" for a weekend - and now you don't - which i think really bites. In a couple months, I will be looking elsewhere - maybe where there is a "shortage."
    WOW. I work in the Memphis, TN area and the hospitals (and we have many many of them including St Jude & LeBohneur) are so short handed they are BEGGING the nursing students to come and work as techs hoping to sway us to stay on at their hospital after graduation and lighten the load. We get paid very well for having no degree (some places base starts at $15 before shift diff which can increase your pay to $19-20/hr).

    We had a job fair today, and there were upwards of twenty booths with reps just drooling over us from as far down south as Jackson-Meridian Ms area.

    Do you live in a small town or an area that is overwhelmed with nursing programs?
  4. by   1sunrise
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    At my school the waiting list had grown to three yrs, before they decided to admitt applicants based on a Nursing Entrance Exam, ACT scores, and such. Problem is...now there are a large amount of students coming straight from HS without even taking pre-req's that get in, take up space, and eventually drop out...

    My goal is to be a nurse educator, my state offers tuition assistance to NP's (which we are overwhelmed with) and traditional teachers (like gradeschool)! This is ridiculous! Many of our instructors work 3 or more jobs to make ends meat!

    I think being a teaching in a profession that you love would be the most rewarding career that anyone could hope for. I plan to do it regardless of pay, however, I would love to see our program expand and our instructors paid for what they do...turn out the best darn nurses in the south!!!
    Hello- I am a Pre-Nursing student in the beginning stages of applying to a BSN program. I am interested in becoming an NP (Peds) eventually. Your statement has just given me something to think about. Does anyone else see this same overabundance of NP's in their areas as a present or foreseeable problem in terms of finding full-time work:innerconf ?
  5. by   kea6783
    Hey ALL! Just wanted to give you a Central Texas prospective..

    Nursing school here are turning away hundreds of applicants.. I know more about the BSN as oppose to ASN programs because that is the route I am going, but the schools I am applying for have to turn away at least 500 applicants each semester. As far as grades go, there's almost no point in applying if you don't have at least a 3.5. But, even though I say that, there is still a significant amount of students applying with 4.0's.

    I hate to say it, but it almost turns me off to nursing and makes me consider other fields.

    Plus, the schools are requiring more and more hours. I don't mean to sound arrogant, I just talk to a lot of older nurses who don't understand why, after two years, I'm not in a program yet. Well, before you go to BSN programs, you are required to have 72 hours. That's six semesters of full time school, and it's rare that students are completing it in the prescribed two years.

    But, I never thought it would be easy and I try to keep my drive and motivation... (I would like to work with Drs without Borders one day..)

    It's so encouraging to see other professionals taking an interest in this issue!!
  6. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    I haven't read all the posts yet, but wanted to comment on this.

    Coaches get extra stipends because of the amount of time they have to work...as with high school...after school practices (usually on a daily basis), home games, traveling to and from away games. Coaches give up a tremendous amount of time for the players, and many of them teach regular classes as well, so they have those students, and their grades to deal with as well.


    OK, back to the original topic.

    Dallas County Community College District now has 2 schools that offer a nursing program (3, if you include the satellite school.) There are a bunch of counties and universities offering nursing programs (Tarrant County, Collin County, Navarro County, Tyler Jr. College, Weatherford College, Trinity Valley CC, McLennan CC, NCTC, CTCD, Midwestern State, TWU, UTA....to name a few within, I think, a 2 - 2 1/2 drive from where I live).

    Even with all of these, the El Centro program of the DCCCD had 274 qualified applicants. That doesn't even include the number of unqualified applicants.

    115 of those 274 had 4.0's. 15 of those had 3.77's with all of their support classes completed, which puts them next on the list. The school only accepted 100 applicants.

    This is extremely sad. For myself, hiring 2-3 more instructors would have given me the opportunity to be accepted for Spring '06.

    I'm not sure why instructors aren't paid more to even want to teach. I would love to become a nurse and teach it. I guess once you become accustomed to making $50K - $60K after how ever many years of nursing and education, you can't afford to drop in pay.


    (These are just ballpark figures b/c I don't know how much they are paid.)

    Either way, all I know is that there needs to be more instructors, and funding should be donated from hospitals, private funding, from the state sales tax, from the Federal income tax....something.



    Quote from Tommybabe
    I totally agree with the idea of paying nursing professors more. I've actually read news stories about how college football coaches, even assistant ones, earn more than full college professors! :angryfire That is crazy! It just shows where our educational priorities lie: Sports are more important than academics. If we can afford to pay coaches, then we can certainly pay professors more, especially since many need a Phd in order to teach.
  7. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    WOW. I work in the Memphis, TN area and the hospitals (and we have many many of them including St Jude & LeBohneur) are so short handed they are BEGGING the nursing students to come and work as techs hoping to sway us to stay on at their hospital after graduation and lighten the load. We get paid very well for having no degree (some places base starts at $15 before shift diff which can increase your pay to $19-20/hr).

    We had a job fair today, and there were upwards of twenty booths with reps just drooling over us from as far down south as Jackson-Meridian Ms area.

    Do you live in a small town or an area that is overwhelmed with nursing programs?
    WOW again. I'm glad I'm headed to Memphis this January. I'll be taking one of those tech jobs. Do you think it is worth applying for the grant that Baptist is offering? They pay for tuition.
  8. by   LEN-RN
    Over 15 months ago, I applied to an R.N. program. I was told that I was accepted, but that there was a waiting list, and that I would begin classes in Spring 2006.

    When I heard this, I looked in to the LPN program that the same school offers. It is a part time evening program. I entered, and will graduate in Dec 2005. If I choose, I can still go on to the R.N. program, and can enter in the 5th quarter. (getting credit for the LPN classes) There are 7 quarters.

    Now I can work as a nurse, and have my employer pay for my education to get my R.N. license. Most places have flexible hours for students.

    I am looking in to an online program though, one that goes at the students pace. I will have the choice to do as much or little as I wish. I have done well with on line classes, so I am leaning that way. And, I can still be with my family.
    Last edit by LEN-RN on Nov 4, '05
  9. by   LEN-RN
    Lildarn, I don't know if I agree about companies preferring foreign nurses though it may be that it depends on the area/region. It is not that way where I am, and I would think that if any nurse is doing poorly or making mistakes, doesnt the board of nursing get involved? I was told that it is so easy to go from a $20 an hour nursing job to minimum wage in a matter of seconds. So I take that as meaning there is little or no room for error on the part of the nurse.

    Foreign nurses have to pass the boards just like everyone else. From what I am seeing, the language barrier has been an obsticle for many, and they are not passing as frequently as english speaking applicants.
  10. by   matanuska
    hey I like your quote, I totally agree.
  11. by   matanuska
    Hey I like your quote, I totally agree.
  12. by   lector
    Well, clearly here at my country(philippines) there are more scho0ls who offer nursing degrees, well it depends on where you pass or can pass an entrance exam and then u can enroll......surely lots or should i say most of the newly graduates from highschool took nursing bec. it is indemand at U.S.,England,Japan,Canada...etc.....im a junior student nusre now...yipeeeee
  13. by   lector
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    WOW. I work in the Memphis, TN area and the hospitals (and we have many many of them including St Jude & LeBohneur) are so short handed they are BEGGING the nursing students to come and work as techs hoping to sway us to stay on at their hospital after graduation and lighten the load. We get paid very well for having no degree (some places base starts at $15 before shift diff which can increase your pay to $19-20/hr).

    We had a job fair today, and there were upwards of twenty booths with reps just drooling over us from as far down south as Jackson-Meridian Ms area.

    Do you live in a small town or an area that is overwhelmed with nursing programs?
    Nice...i hope i would work at ur hospital......hehehehe

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