Nursing schools turn students away - page 4

As the local health care industry faces a looming nursing shortage for the second time in as many decades, area nursing programs say they are having to turn away dozens of well-qualified students. ... Read More

  1. by   foxyhill21
    My school only accepts 80 this semester it was 1,500 applications. Only 80 people were accepted they are short staff, in need of 11 professors then they can maybe accept 10 more students. The pay for nursing professors is horrible (it is so sad to see educated people make less then people with no degree)
  2. by   RNinSoCal
    Sorry about this rant but this is one of my pet peeves.
    It isn't only the lack of spaces for students, it is also the lousy pay and lack of full-time status with benefits for instructors. I have a friend who is a nurse educator (clinical and classroom adult med/surg) but has to work part time in the hospital just to make ends meet. He hasn't had health benefits in 4 years. He is thinking about quitting his teaching job because his wife is pregnant and they will lose her health benefits if she decides to stay home with the baby. I want to become a nurse educator but am not willing to take a 30,000 dollar a year pay cut and lose my benefits. Why should I spend upwards of 25,000 dollars to get my MSN if there is no financial reward at the end of all my hard work. I know that many educators do it because they love it and that is why they tolerate the lower pay.
    Nursing programs need the funding for more student spaces and better pay/benefits for instructors if we are to keep turning out new nurses.
    Rant over
  3. by   bergren
    I have not read through all five pages of posts. But there is one more factor limiting enrollment of nursing students in addition to a shortage of professors, and that is limited clinical spots. Many pro student agencies are student "fatigued". They are juggling 2 and three nursing programs in their acute and community settings and sometimes must take a break or cut back to prevent burnout among the staff and to make sure the patients are not stressed by students shift after shift after shift.

    So one thing that nurses can do to fight the shortage is to find out if their facility can take students. Schools are often turned down by health care facilities for the smallest of reasons: "cafeteria is being remodeled", "we do not want to create passwords for the electronic medicals records twice a year", and "our parking is already tight"??? Nursing programs and faculty are desperate and will gladly work out reasonable and flexible solutions to these and other issues. We will bring lunch, we will get all passwords one time for the entire next two years, and we will bus students.

    Another common reason refusing students is "we are short staffed" and this can be a self fulfilling prophecy. Nurses can volunteer to be preceptors and can welcome students with a smile and tell them how glad they are to have them on the unit and be available for that question you have answered 40 times already. One unit I taught on never had any open positions because my students loved the staff. Students who SWORE they would never work Peds and said they were dreading the rotation at the beginning of the semester were buoyed by the positive vibes and acceptance of their learner status by the nursing staff and the nursing managers on the floor. The staff made it a safe place to learn - allowed the students to go to the very edge of their talents without being abandoned. It was a VERY tough unit to work on with 14 services and physician teams and very critically ill patients, but the students lined up at the door at graduation for a job.
  4. by   Kay28
    Are all nursing schools having to turn students away? what about community colleges, are they any better?
  5. by   Kay28
    Are all nursing schools having to turn students away? are community colleges any better?
  6. by   bergren
    In the Chicago area, the ADN programs as well as the BSN and graduate entry programs all have waiting lists and many many more qualified applicants than openings.
  7. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Kay28
    Are all nursing schools having to turn students away? what about community colleges, are they any better?
    yes...my community college has an excellent reputation for turning out the best nurses in the tri=state area. When I applied the waithing list was three yrs. They have since switched to a new admittence system, and most applicantst have a 4.0 and excellent ACT scores!!! very competitive
  8. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Nemhain
    Yes, I think the other poster misunderstood...

    Anyway, I just wanted to let you know that I agree. I can't believe that there isn't the same assistance available to people who want to be nurse educators as those who want to be NP's or to other teachers who want to further their careers. If the problem of the nursing shortage lies in the lack of nurse educators why can't people who want to teach nursing get the same funding as other people????

    thank you for understanding my point! we are definitely on the same page here....MORE MORE MORE nursing instructors are needed!!!
  9. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from bergren
    I have not read through all five pages of posts. But there is one more factor limiting enrollment of nursing students in addition to a shortage of professors, and that is limited clinical spots. Many pro student agencies are student "fatigued". They are juggling 2 and three nursing programs in their acute and community settings and sometimes must take a break or cut back to prevent burnout among the staff and to make sure the patients are not stressed by students shift after shift after shift.

    So one thing that nurses can do to fight the shortage is to find out if their facility can take students. Schools are often turned down by health care facilities for the smallest of reasons: "cafeteria is being remodeled", "we do not want to create passwords for the electronic medicals records twice a year", and "our parking is already tight"??? Nursing programs and faculty are desperate and will gladly work out reasonable and flexible solutions to these and other issues. We will bring lunch, we will get all passwords one time for the entire next two years, and we will bus students.

    Another common reason refusing students is "we are short staffed" and this can be a self fulfilling prophecy. Nurses can volunteer to be preceptors and can welcome students with a smile and tell them how glad they are to have them on the unit and be available for that question you have answered 40 times already. One unit I taught on never had any open positions because my students loved the staff. Students who SWORE they would never work Peds and said they were dreading the rotation at the beginning of the semester were buoyed by the positive vibes and acceptance of their learner status by the nursing staff and the nursing managers on the floor. The staff made it a safe place to learn - allowed the students to go to the very edge of their talents without being abandoned. It was a VERY tough unit to work on with 14 services and physician teams and very critically ill patients, but the students lined up at the door at graduation for a job.
    You are absolutely correct. This is one of the main issues with my school. They had to cut some spots this semester because of these issues.
  10. by   hope3456
    I heard that the local cc that I just graduated from fixed the problem of low pay for nursing instructors. They (the instructors) got a hefty raise - but the tuition for the nursing students nearly doubled in order to give them this raise. I'm just glad I graduated when I did!
  11. by   10ACGIRL
    Quote from brian
    As the local health care industry faces a looming nursing shortage for the second time in as many decades, area nursing programs say they are having to turn away dozens of well-qualified students.



    Some nursing programs such as Wichita State University are responding to the increased demand by hiring more instructors and increasing the number of students they take each semester.



    Others want to expand but can't because of a lack of funding, faculty or both.



    Nursing school administrators and health care providers say they are entering an unprecedented time when the number of elderly people is growing and will continue to grow. That will cause an even greater need for health care services and the nurses who deliver them.



    "Pretty soon the demand is going to far, far exceed the supply," says Judy Stroot, vice president of nursing at Via Christi Regional Medical Center-St. Francis.

    Full Story: http://wichita.bizjournals.com/bizwo...ory_id=1178323
    That just stupid nonsence. how and why could there be such a shortage when they r needed so bad? THat is so stupid to turn them away reguard of income of the state!:angryfire
  12. by   worldtraveler
    Currently I am listening to a 2 hr. special program titled "Baby Boom Crisis of 2010". Essentially the program's guests are elaborating on what will happen in the Very Near Future(4-5 years) as many teachers, Doctors and Nurses retire as they are The Baby Boomers. Nursing will see a Shortage of 1,000,000 in the coming years due to the massive retirements, decreased birthrate, immigration ect. Nursing will be Upside-Down. This question was poised to the Presidental Candidates in the last election, the Voters made their choice. The Candidate backed by many of our Governing Bodies(NLN) did not win-I don't want to turn this thread into a Political Debate but Politics plays into this crisis. So far, not much new funding has been forthcoming from the Federal Level to alleviate this crisis. Nurses need to follow thier Candidates and support THOSE who help us and have a History of helping us and Education in General. Hold those who fail to back up their promises with $$$ by voting them out. For the life of me, I cannot understand why states are turning away practicing LPNs who wish to attain their Education via the Distance learning route. This could be a lower cost way to increase enrollment and graduate Nurses without compromising safty in the Hospitals as they complete their Clinical practicums.Too practical I guess.
  13. by   lindarn
    While I agree that there will be many more nurse needed in the not to distant future, and we need new blood to fill in the ranks for the nurses who will be retiring, there has been ABSOLUTELY NO EFFORT TO RETAIN THE NURSES WHO ARE NOW GRADUATED AND WORKING IN THE HOSPITALS. IN FACT, THERE SEEMS TO BE AN EVEN GREATER EFFORT TO PISS OFF, DISGUST AND DRIVE AWAY THE EXPERIENCED NURSES WHO ARE ALREADY HERE. NURSES SALARIES ARE ONCE AGAIN STAGNATING, BENEFITS HAVE GOTTEN WORSE, AND WORKING CONDITIONS HAVE DETERIORATED. WHY IS THAT? IF THERE IS SUCH A SHORTAGE OF NURESES, WHY IS THERE NO EFFORT TO RETAIN, THE NURSES ALREADY HERE. PAY THEM MORE MONEY, BETTER BENEFITS, IMPROVE WORKING CONDITIONS, ETC.

    This is because, hospitals are looking at the big picture. Mutiply the numbers of nurses that are projected what will be needed to care for the large numbers of baby boomers, and you will come up with a staggering number. Do you think the hospitals really want to spend that much money for nurses? Isn't it easier to push graduate, experienced nurses out the door after 2- 4 years, then cry to the government that they have to make more visas available for foreign nurses? That we have to start allowing unskilled, unlicensed workers take over more and more of our professional practice, because we are just not available for large enough numbers that will be needed? How much more power we will have to bargain with with the increased need for us? Do you really think they want that to happen? Sit back and LOOK AT THE BIG PICTURE THAT THE HOSPITALS AND INSURANCE COMPANIES ARE!!! THAT IS YOUR ANSWER!

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington

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