Nursing Industry Desperate To Find New Hires - page 2

by Bugaloo

I found this article and thought you might find it interesting.... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Sterren
    Maybe they should take the money they spent on those gift cards and dedicate it to extra support for new grads in those hard-to-staff areas such as ICU or ER, instead.
    I don't think it's quite that simple......the problem is that many new grads WANT the jobs in the ICU or ER or other specialty areas, but unless a facility is equipped to train those folks, they just can not fill their staffing needs solely with new grads. They need a proportionate number of experienced (and willing-to-train) nurses to work with the new grads.

    As to med/surg positions, I know where we are those are plentiful. But seriously, what's the percentage of new grads who want to work on a med/surg floor? Or ortho or neuro?
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    Many people see long, expensive new grad residency programs as the answer to the problem. However, it is more complicated than simply providing those types of programs. It is not financially viable to offer those programs to new grads who will leave in only a year or so. Hospitals cannot keep throwing money at those new grads (with such programs) without some reason to believe those nurses will stay in those positions long enough to justify the large investment.

    Just read many of the posts here on allnurses -- from the large number of nursing students and new grads who enter their first hospital job with NO INTENTION of working in that job for more that a year, maybe 2 at the most. As long as hospitals "get burned" by such nurses, they will hesitate to invest big bucks in deluxe residency programs.

    That's not saying that new grads should not be hired or that they should not receive a good orientation and a few special things to help them with their role transition. I'm just saying that those things come at a cost and that cost needs to be considered when looking at the situation. I think we are going to have to think about the situation quite creatively and make some changes in the general culture and expectations of nursing and new grads vs experience if we are going to successfully address this problem.
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    hi all, i have a bachelor's in marketing and i am considering going back to school to do nursing instead. the article and comments were interesting. i'm really looking for some peer guidance in my decision making process of going back to school. as some of you stated hospitals are hesitant to higher new grads in icu/er, however what units tend to be hiring more new grads? i'm from michigan, if anyone is from the midwest, what is the employment outlook like in this area? also if anyone is taking or has taken an accelerated second-degree nursing program i would really like to hear about your experiences in school and after.

    i would really like to open up some dialogue and would appreciate all your help.

    thanks!
  4. 1
    Quote from WDWpixieRN
    I don't think it's quite that simple......the problem is that many new grads WANT the jobs in the ICU or ER or other specialty areas, but unless a facility is equipped to train those folks, they just can not fill their staffing needs solely with new grads. They need a proportionate number of experienced (and willing-to-train) nurses to work with the new grads.

    As to med/surg positions, I know where we are those are plentiful. But seriously, what's the percentage of new grads who want to work on a med/surg floor? Or ortho or neuro?
    I know it's not really that simple, I was mostly being sarcastic because I think that it's actually a little offensive to be rewarding non-employees with gift cards instead of putting that money toward retaining and rewarding the people who already work there. Making somewhere an attractive place to work for the employees is a much better practice than luring people to an unpleasant workplace with gas cards, right?

    And you're right about the med-surg/ortho/neuro thing. I only know of a handful of my fellow new grads who willingly head there. Which, of course, means that the experienced nurses in those areas are chronically overworked and are more likely to leave the field entirely, which means that med-surg gets that much more of a reputation as an unpleasant place to work, which means even fewer new grads are willing to go there to get the experience to become "desireable" employees .... lather, rinse, repeat.
    mochabean likes this.
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    And Florida,especially central Fl is bone dry for any kind of nursing job except seasonal contracts in God's waiting room. They do hire new grad here and pretty much only new grads or new RN because they cost a lot less than experienced nurses. I'm not against hiring new nurses by any means but there should be a mix of experiences.
  6. 2
    Quote from Sterren
    I know it's not really that simple, I was mostly being sarcastic because I think that it's actually a little offensive to be rewarding non-employees with gift cards instead of putting that money toward retaining and rewarding the people who already work there. Making somewhere an attractive place to work for the employees is a much better practice than luring people to an unpleasant workplace with gas cards, right?

    And you're right about the med-surg/ortho/neuro thing. I only know of a handful of my fellow new grads who willingly head there. Which, of course, means that the experienced nurses in those areas are chronically overworked and are more likely to leave the field entirely, which means that med-surg gets that much more of a reputation as an unpleasant place to work, which means even fewer new grads are willing to go there to get the experience to become "desireable" employees .... lather, rinse, repeat.
    Okay...mea culpa....guess I misunderstood. I totally agree with this assessment of the situation.

    It's interesting, as you note, that they can throw money at possible new hires, yet I get stuck working over the holidays and not only am I bummed as I'm pretty sure there was NOT any Christmas this year over the 5 nights I was working, but I worked my tail off and had the worst 5 nights of my life since I got off orientation in September. Did anyone think that perhaps splitting the holiday might be nice a bit of an incentive to "tough it out?" Did anyone in management happen to think that perhaps NOT closing another floor and directing all of those pts to our floor might make those of us who had to work a bit less resentful those nights?

    And hey, here's another thing that makes too much sense -- how about gradually working new grads up to handing 5+ pts? You know, like giving us only 4 our first month or so on the floor alone so that while we spend half of OUR shifts running around finding someone free to help us or answer our questions or get direction, we might actually get done in time to go home with the rest of ya'?!?! And that might also give us time to actually learn the ropes of our jobs or read some charts or figure out who the players are on our floors, etc. That way, we might actually feel competent or like we're learning our jobs instead of just surviving them the best we can. Or how about charge nurses who actually get in and assist new grads instead of hiding away in offices or acting annoyed when you come to them with a question? Maybe some consideration to assignments and number of admissions per shift the first few months so we don't feel like totally inept idiots with some assignments that drive the experienced RNs on the floor batty.

    ARGH. No easy answers to this situation. I know it may have actually been tougher in the "old days", but we also don't live, breathe, and eat nursing while we're in school like the days of nursing dorms, etc.

    I just want a chance to learn to be competent or I, too, will be one that runs to another job. I feel like if I'm overwhelmed with med/surg, how could I ever possibly hope to work an ED or ICU or other specialty area? Right now, I'm thinking my old IT cubicle sounds more and more inviting than ever; maybe I need to set my sights on nursing informatics or something else where I can once again feel "skillful" and useful.
    Sterren and BelleKat like this.
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    As an RN with 32 years experience, the last 16 at the same facility, I would like to suggest that hospitals need to do more, lots more, to reward those who do stay. I sit on our negotiating team and have for the past 3 contracts. The administration makes lots of talk about recruitment incentives, but does ABSOLUTELY NOTHING for retention. There are nurses at my hospital who've been there 30 years and they don't get anything to keep them there.

    If I was in a position to relocate I could rake in the big sign on bonuses that are offered, and some do exactly that. Until administrations reward longevity, nurses who can are going to hospital hop.
    BelleKat and KeyMaster like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from WDWpixieRN
    I just want a chance to learn to be competent or I, too, will be one that runs to another job. I feel like if I'm overwhelmed with med/surg, how could I ever possibly hope to work an ED or ICU or other specialty area?
    Doesn't that just say it all, right there? I finished my orientation a while back but still don't really feel as confident as I think I should. Paying attention to supporting and encouraging new grads would be a much, much better investment than gift cards for interviewees, in the long run.


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