Nursing Care In Crisis

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    An inquest earlier this year heard that a 22-year-old man recovering from a hip operation in a London hospital was so dehydrated he had dialled 999 and begged the police for a drink. He died shortly afterwards. The case caused understandable outrage – yet we now learn it was far from an isolated incident. Figures published yesterday by the Office for National Statistics reveal that 43 patients in NHS hospitals starved to death last year and 111 died of thirst. In addition, nearly 300 hospital patients were recorded as being malnourished when they died; a further 558 were recorded as being in a state of severe dehydration when they died; and 78 patients were killed by bed sores. The overwhelming majority of these people were elderly. The Patients Association has described these figures as a “shaming” reflection on 21st-century Britain.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/95...#disqus_thread
    lindarn likes this.
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  3. 18 Comments so far...

  4. 9
    There's got to be more to that story than that. I'm sure he didn't die because no one gave him water. Also one could technically say many hospice patients die of thirst and/or starvation once feeding is stopped. But death of starvation/dehydration due to neglect? Come now, I doubt it. Newspapers love to be alarmist....
    Altra, joanna73, tewdles, and 6 others like this.
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    That's crazy...is Hitler still alive?
    TJ'sMOM and cardiacrocks like this.
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    Quote from BrandonLPN
    There's got to be more to that story than that. I'm sure he didn't die because no one gave him water. Also one could technically say many hospice patients die of thirst and/or starvation once feeding is stopped. But death of starvation/dehydration due to neglect? Come now, I doubt it. Newspapers love to be alarmist....
    Well yes, there is *more* to the story and none of it came out well for the hospital, staff nor NHS for that matter. Coroner put blame on "incompetence" of NHS staff.

    Read more: Kane Gorny: Coroner blames 'incompetence' of NHS staff after patient dies from dehydration | Mail Online
    Szasz_is_Right, Esme12, and Sisyphus like this.
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    I'm trying to get the hospital the benefit of the doubt, but between the missed meds, and not one nurse or physician following up on his hypernatremia....I'm sorry but at least several of the staff sound like they shouldn't be in healthcare.
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    Is this the face of governemnt run healthcare?
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    I stand corrected. Without reading the article, I assumed this was just more melodrama fluff news. Sounds like one of those "perfect storms" of randomly incompetent staff being scheduled on the same shifts.
    tewdles likes this.
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    When it (the followup article) talks repeatedly about the vital medication... I wonder if the med was prescribed for the patient at all during his final stay for the hip replacement. Also noted is the feeding tube... maybe he was supposed to get his intake that way and there was an obvious lack of water flushes for the tube. But if his DI med wasn't prescribed, you'd have to be on a sterile water IV drip and pretty much have 1/2 strength tube feed diluted with water going in the tube, to just keep him alive. And he'd probably still be "thirsty." So the home med reconciliation once again comes up as extremely important. Not to mention you'd think the background condition would be mentioned in nurse-to-nurse reporting. I am sure staffing was bad and that played a part in skipping vital signs based on "he's finally asleep" type thinking. The docs who thought "hey is he off his meds or coming down off drugs" needed to take ten more minutes to sit down and go through his chart, they might have seen the references to DI and had a little lightbulb moment there.

    So sad, it's all woulda, coulda, shoulda.
    tewdles, emmy27, and TJ'sMOM like this.
  11. 2
    Quote from Esme12
    Is this the face of governemnt run healthcare?
    Poor staffing levels and or bad decisions by same can happen regardless of whom is paying.

    Unlike much of the United States, the UK still maintains a strong independent coroner, inquest and post mortem system toshed light upon "unexplained" or deaths that otherwise shouldn't have occured. OTHO here in the US the number of autospies outside of criminal investigation have been falling for years. Indeed many hospitals have long disbanded such departments leaving everything to the local ME's office, and even there recources are often stretched.

    At last count the number of patient deaths due to "medical/nursing errors" is about 200,000, but since those are only reported numbers the exact toll is likely much higher. Nor does that number here include IIRC deaths from poor nursing care. Bedsores for instance are entirely preventable and often an indication of poor nursing service. Yet if the UK report as stated above has nearly 100 such deaths, one wonders what would be found in US facilities.

    As the saying goes, we see what we look for.

    Coroners, post-mortems and inquests : Directgov - Government, citizens and rights
    elkpark and koi310 like this.
  12. 0
    Agreed......But I still think medicine is on a slippery slope. Preferring profit margin to patient care. As I patient I have seen a change. It's frightening and sad.


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