Nursing 2006 Salary Survey finds salaries leveling off

  1. nursing: volume 36(10) october 2006 p 46-51
    salary survey

    cheryl l. mee, rn, bc, cmsrn, msn nursing 2006 editor-in-chief


    over 1,100 nurses responded to our salary survey published in the january issue of nursing2006. in contrast to survey results from previous years, which have shown steady income gains for nurses, this year's survey indicated that salaries were generally flat. in 2006, for example, staff nurses reported an average annual income of $47,200, compared with $47,600 in 2005. starting salaries for both rns and lpns were also flat from 2005 to 2006.

    looking at average salaries for all respondents, we found that the average dropped for the first time in the 7 years we've conducted this survey, from $58,600 in 2005 to $51,000 in 2006. however, a significant change in the profile of nurses responding in 2006 probably explains this difference. (more nurses working less than 5 yrs responded to survey. karen)



    here are a few other key findings:
    * managers reported an average salary of $62,800, down from $68,000 in 2005.
    * advanced practice nurses reported an average annual salary of $69,600, significantly less than the $73,200 reported in 2005.
    * nurses in salaried positions made an average of $10,000 more per year than those paid by the hour.
    * salaries flatten when nurses are in a position for more than 10 years. nurses working in the same position for 11 to 15 years report a salary of $56,000; those holding their positions for over 15 years made $56,700.
    * as in previous years, men in nursing made more money than women. the average salary for all male respondents was $54,600, compared with $50,600 for women-an 8% difference. looking at rns specifically, the gender gap was about 6%. but for lpns, the gap was even wider: 16%.


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  2. 64 Comments

  3. by   surfer betty crocker
    what does this mean for new nurses getting ready to enter into the profession? Are the salary outlooks dim--meanding that the salaries will level off then drop off??
  4. by   OC_An Khe
    Salaries are a matter of supply and demand. Currently there seems in most places an adequate numbers of RNs to meet the demand for nursing services. However, the demand for nursing services over the next decade or two will be increaasing; while at the same time the number of RNs will decrease if current trends continue. Its during the time of the baby boomers retirement and old age that services/needs will increase. Since a significant number of the RNs practising today are boomers the current barely adequate supply to a shortage of nurses will continue. I wouldn't be concerned on a macro/ global picture of nursing with regards to salary and job availability. Granted there will be regional differences but on a whole the next 2-3 decades will be good employmnet years for RNs.
  5. by   rjflyn
    Personally one cant draw many conclusions based on such a small sample. Shoot I have worked in hospitals with 1100 nurses.

    Rj
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from rjflyn
    Personally one cant draw many conclusions based on such a small sample. Shoot I have worked in hospitals with 1100 nurses.
    True but nursing, unfortunately, has a long history of stagnant wages. If you look at this U.S. Health Department report, wages have barely kept up with inflation for the last 24 years (chart 7).

    Preliminary Findings 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses

    I notice that this report says union nurses make about $7K more a year than non-union nurses and, that's consistent with what the Labor Department has reported for years now. So, it seems like the survey is, at least, somewhat accurate.

    :typing
  7. by   HARRN2b
    And Lizz, what I do not understand is why so many are anti union. To me, 7k is worth working in a unionized place, not to mention, better ratio's.
  8. by   ann945n
    This is a wayyyyy too small of a sample population to draw any conclusion
  9. by   oramar
    My personal observation is that supply of nurses has tightened up again. That is just the local market in Pittsburgh. What do I base that on? Increase in help wanted ads. Started recieving mail again asking me to come to work for certain agencies that seem to feel the shortage first. First time in 18 months my facility has offered premium pay to fill shortage on certain units.
  10. by   MKZ
    I have been working for four months in a non-unionized hospital in California, I started out at 43.00 dollars/hr. My mortgage is 3500.00 a month. My salary is not sufficient. Nursing is a poorly paid profession. If it was largely a male dominated role, nurses would have been paid alot more a long time ago. And ratios would be a God given right.
  11. by   miss arron
    one thing i found interesting is that even though they're the minority, male nurses made more than female nurses....

    i guess females just always get the short end of the stick when it comes to salaries
  12. by   jmckeith
    Quote from miss arron
    one thing i found interesting is that even though they're the minority, male nurses made more than female nurses....

    i guess females just always get the short end of the stick when it comes to salaries
    Miss arron, being a prospective male nurse, I wanted to get more information about men in nursing. During my English composition course, I did a research paper on exactly that topic "men in nursing". The research revealed when it came to salary and benifits, women did not push the issue as much as men. Now as to why that is, I have no idea. Just thought I would share this info.
  13. by   doingourbest
    Quote from miss arron
    one thing i found interesting is that even though they're the minority, male nurses made more than female nurses....

    i guess females just always get the short end of the stick when it comes to salaries
    I was actually surprised to see there was such little difference between the mens and womens. As a nursing supervisor there is one other person it the facility who has the same job on the same shift and he gets $9 an hour more than I do. Also, the floor nurses working under me who are men are getting $4-$6 dollars more an hour than I am. Every facility I have been in pays the men a lot more than the women and usually the men aren't doing the work the women are. They can just refuse to do anything and get away with it.:angryfire
  14. by   pjs91n
    I am having an issue at work regarding salary, I am a LPN and we are having an inservice to get all nursing staff IV certified. I really want to learn this but feel that is a RN responsibilty. there is not always a RN in house during my shift (11-7) and that would fall on the senior LPN shouldn't we get extra $ for this? Thank you in advance for your insight

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