Nurses to get 20 percent raise (California) - page 6

LONG BEACH-Long Beach Memorial Medical Center nurses will receive pay raises averaging 20 percent over three years under a tentative agreement that also features elements to better assist nurses with... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RN34TX
    My thought was that you'd have to at least have somewhat of an idea to anticipate things like heavy traffic and higher housing costs and I can't believe that anyone would move to CA and be taken completely by surprise by it.
    This is also true. Let's just say I've gone out of my way to upgrade my insurance coverage three times over the last two years because of skyrocketing home prices ... and because California is natural disaster central ... and I don't want to get caught with my pants down. I'm probably over-insured but that's the only way to protect yourself from the higher cost of living when things go wrong.

    The insurance upgrades are only an extra $200 a year, which is pretty cheap when you compare the cost of trying to replace your house. Still, a lot of people don't buy them because they don't think disaster will happen to them.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 11, '05
  2. by   Sherwood
    At my Hospital in Orange County California our management has given us an 8%, then a 7% raise last year and we are due another 5% to 8% raise later this year. We are NOT a union facility, in fact Western Medical Center in Santa Ana voted against the CNA two years ago!

    Hospital Management across the country know that in order to keep Nurses and attract new staff they have to remain competative. If they are not then they must be paying out big bucks to registries and travel nurses.
  3. by   RNKitty
    In Eastern Washington, I make $30/hr and bought a 3000 square foot, 4 bed, 2 bath home in the best school district for $145,000 a year and a half ago. I am in a nice, safe, family neighborhood for my kids and any shopping I need to do is less than a 5 minute drive away. Can't convince me I'd do better in CA (unless it is working/commuting insanely for the next 10 years).

    Money isn't everything. I won't have equity to buy houses outright in other states as everyone is coming HERE to do the same and raising the cost of housing outside what locals can afford. However, I love the idea of living in one community and getting to know people. We watch each others children grow and build a history together. I wouldn't want to move in 20 years and give all that up just for the money. I'll pay off my house and be a 401k type of gal - not independantly wealthy, but rich in people.
  4. by   Ventjock
    Quote from Sherwood
    At my Hospital in Orange County California our management has given us an 8%, then a 7% raise last year and we are due another 5% to 8% raise later this year. We are NOT a union facility, in fact Western Medical Center in Santa Ana voted against the CNA two years ago!

    Hospital Management across the country know that in order to keep Nurses and attract new staff they have to remain competative. If they are not then they must be paying out big bucks to registries and travel nurses.
    sorry to hijack the thread, but are these raises only for nurses?

    what about allied health? Radiology, respiratory therapy, physical therapy, lab?

    are they getting substantial raises also?
  5. by   tlcprn2u
    Quote from Sherwood
    At my Hospital in Orange County California our management has given us an 8%, then a 7% raise last year and we are due another 5% to 8% raise later this year. We are NOT a union facility, in fact Western Medical Center in Santa Ana voted against the CNA two years ago!

    Hospital Management across the country know that in order to keep Nurses and attract new staff they have to remain competative. If they are not then they must be paying out big bucks to registries and travel nurses.
    Your hospital's management is keeping competitive in a market that has a high union density. That is one of the ways unions improve working conditions: by raising standards throughout the community. Everybody benefits.

    Except that for the non-unionized facilities there are no guaranteed provisions and there is no just cause process for their employees. I would much rather have things in writing, in a contract that is a legal document by which everyone involved has to abide.

    Your assumption that raising wages to stay competitive is the practice throughout the country is incorrect. Where there is lower union density, despite increased property values, increased cost of living, increased nursing vacancies, etc., the choices hospital administrators make are not necessarily reflective of a willingness to stay competitive. They continue to dish out big bucks to agency and travellers, and pay overtime to regular staff, rather than raise salaries. This is their short-term band-aid fix (cost-containment approach) to a long standing problem.

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