Nurses save diabetic woman at Walgreens then get charged for the glucometer they used

  1. wow - you THINK the manager at the walgreens would be a little nicer!

    "A woman went into a potentially fatal diabetic coma while in line at a New York-area Walgreens. Two nurses and an off duty sheriff's officer happened to be in line. They grab a carton of OJ, some sugar, and a glucometer and manage to raise her blood sugar a little bit. According to their reports, after the paramedics took the patient away, the Walgreens manager came out to demand that the merchandise be paid for, otherwise it's shoplifting"

    See video:

    http://www.myfoxny.com/myfox/pages/H...d=1.1.1&sflg=1
    Last edit by UM Review RN on May 8, '08 : Reason: To fix title
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  2. 90 Comments

  3. by   birdgardner
    A link that works as story is not available at one given: http://njo.live.advance.net/hudsonco...ne_walgre.html


    Perhaps Fox pulled it for a reason?
    Last edit by UM Review RN on May 8, '08 : Reason: refers to above post
  4. by   SteveNNP
    No, the original link works....
    Last edit by UM Review RN on May 9, '08 : Reason: to correct header
  5. by   nelcoy4
    That's a shame. That manager should have had a heart.

    But on another note, the nurses were brave to help the lady out. When things happen to people out in public, I rarely put my hands on them. I was told in my CPR class that when a health professional puts their hands on somebody (off-duty) and helps them, they are liable. I'm SO scared of getting sued. If I do help, I don't tell anybody I'm a nurse. When the paramedics come around I usually fade into the crowd.
    Last edit by UM Review RN on May 9, '08 : Reason: to correct header
  6. by   RedhairedNurse
    That is really sad that the manager acted that way.

    A nurse cannot be sued for acting as a good samaritan. There is a law called the "good samaritan law" that protects us nurses. Actually, I've heard that we can be sued if we sit back and do nothing for a person in an emergency.
  7. by   RedhairedNurse
    Here is a good link that helps explain the Good Samartin Law

    http://medi-smart.com/gslaw.htm
  8. by   nelcoy4
    Quote from brealynn
    Here is a good link that helps explain the Good Samartin Law

    http://medi-smart.com/gslaw.htm
    Thank you. I'm glad you clarified this for me
  9. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from nelcoy4
    That's a shame. That manager should have had a heart.

    But on another note, the nurses were brave to help the lady out. When things happen to people out in public, I rarely put my hands on them. I was told in my CPR class that when a health professional puts their hands on somebody (off-duty) and helps them, they are liable. I'm SO scared of getting sued. If I do help, I don't tell anybody I'm a nurse. When the paramedics come around I usually fade into the crowd.
    In addition to the good samaritan law, the malpractice insurance that I and many other nurses have protects you in such situations. Also, who's to say that you have to give them your real name?:wink2:
  10. by   MarySunshine
    How do you get OJ into someone that's in a coma?
  11. by   tanthalas
    lol, wow.
  12. by   november17
    Quote from MarySunshine
    How do you get OJ into someone that's in a coma?
    Maybe one of them got creative and ran to the auto parts section for a funnel and some lube?
  13. by   MrsMommaRN
    how sad. thankfully those people were around to help.
  14. by   canoehead
    I think I would have told him to call the cops, and let them record it for posterity. For about $25 he avoided having a dead body to clean up- he saved money, and they should ask for compensation, lol.

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