Nurses rally at Texas Capitol building - page 6

Nurses rally at Texas Capitol building They devote their lives to helping patients, now they're asking for the state's help. Tuesday, dozens of nurses from across the state rallied at the State... Read More

  1. by   gauge14iv
    13,717 (7.4%) medical malpractice payment reports were made against physicians in Texas 1990-2003 (2003 Annual Report, National Practitioner Data Bank, US DHHS)

    20,562 (11.03%) medical malpractice payment reports were made against physicians in California 1990-2003 (2003 Annual Report, National Practitioner Data Bank, US DHHS)

    It appears that the raw number of claims payments against physicians overall is higher in CA, but I don't know how that translates to claims per million/pop etc. It also doesn't illustrate the number of claims against nurses. I am not finding a good source for that data - now I'm curious!
  2. by   gauge14iv
    http://www.npdb-hipdb.com/pubs/stats...ual_Report.pdf

    Page 67

    Maybe they just charge more here because people will pay it LOL
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from gauge14iv
    http://www.npdb-hipdb.com/pubs/stats...ual_Report.pdf

    Page 67

    Maybe they just charge more here because people will pay it LOL
    Am I reading this document right? Because it looks like Texas nurses have double the amount of malpractice payments versus California nurses. (p. 67)

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 18, '07
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    Total number of RNs in Texas as of September of 2006 was 180,137: ftp://www.bne.state.tx.us/06-co-rn.pdf

    The total number of RN licenses in California was 298,513 in April 2005: http://www.rn.ca.gov/forms/pdf/forecasts2005.pdf
  5. by   gauge14iv
    The way it read to me was that Texas nurses had 1/3 the risk that CA nurses had because CA nurses were more likely to be named in conjunction with a physician - but I could be wrong. I wish I could find real, raw numbers. Those would actually be more useful.

    But then again - if you never plan to work in Texas, and you like working in CA, This discussion probably isnt all that relevant.
  6. by   PMHNP10
    Quote from gauge14iv
    OR...

    Thats all you need in Texas because for nurses in Texas the risk has been traditionally pretty low.

    In addition - your home is protected in Texas by the homestead exemption - you can lose almost anything else, but you can't lose your home. That may have something to do with it too.
    Actually, that's not entirely accurate:

    Pretty much everything is protected except for liquid cash savings (e. g., if you win the lottery, your winnings could be used to pay for a settlement) and some savings plans.

    Here is the Texas Property Code that lists what is safe. I esp like number 10 which lets you keep 2 horses mules or donkeys and a saddle, blanket, and bridle for each; 12 head of cattle; 60 head of other types of livestock;; and 120 fowl.
    And my cat Sadie can sleep soundly throughout the day and night knowing that if my wife or myself boo-boo she's safe with us.
    http://tlo2.tlc.state.tx.us/statutes....htm#42.001.00


    As for the differences in premiums, I'm too am curious why there is such a difference. I know TX Auto insurance rates are second highest in US to only NY (I believe) because of the number of claims. So it's reasonable to believe Professional Liability Rates are higher in TX because of the same. In general, the greater the risk, the more you have to pay and the less you get covered with.
  7. by   Sheri257
    Quote from gauge14iv
    The way it read to me was that Texas nurses had 1/3 the risk that CA nurses had because CA nurses were more likely to be named in conjunction with a physician - but I could be wrong. I wish I could find real, raw numbers. Those would actually be more useful.

    But then again - if you never plan to work in Texas, and you like working in CA, This discussion probably isnt all that relevant.
    I was just looking at the number of nurse malpractice payments without the docs. There were 200 in California, 430 in Texas.

    It's not really a question of whether I want to work in Texas. I was just wondering if this is evidence of what some of the Texas nurses have been talking about with ratios, working conditions etc. on this board. Afterall, when nurses complain about lousy working conditions, they usually are also worried about putting their license at risk.

    And this might interest you: While you can only get $300,000 in coverage as a Texas floor nurse, you can get the $6 million coverage with NSO as a Texas NP. It does cost $400 more than California but ...

    Isn't it strange if NP's, who usually are a greater liability risk than floor nurses because they have more responsibility ... turn out to be less of a liability risk than floor nurses in Texas?

    Why wouldn't Texas floor nurses be able to get the $6 million in coverage if NP's can?

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 18, '07
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
  9. by   gauge14iv
    Im laughing at the HUGE turnout there LOL
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from psychrn03
    As for the differences in premiums, I'm too am curious why there is such a difference.
    I think I found at least part of the answer. The bottom line is that NSO must have been paying a lot of malpractice claims for Texas RN's. That's why the premiums are higher and the coverage is so limited there.

    I couldn't find data specifically on RN's but, this NP claims study shows that when amount of malpractice payments goes up, so do the premiums ... and, the amount of insurance coverage goes down.

    http://www.cna.com/cnaeportal/vcm_co...laimsStudy.pdf

    For example: in Florida, NSO had to pay more NP claims there than any other state (34). Whereas NP's in Texas and California only had 9 claims each.

    Therefore, NSO will only cover Florida NP's up to $750,000 while they'll cover California and Texas NP's up to $6 million. And, the premium rates are apparently driven by how much they pay on those claims.

    Even though California and Texas NP's had the same number of paid claims, NSO had to pay much more for Texas NP claims: $318,000 on average versus only $36,000 on average for California NP's.

    This is obviously why NP premiums cost $400 more in Texas than California.

    Based on this data, I can only conclude that Texas RN malpractice payments must be really high. Since NSO is charging them double the amount of premiums for a fraction of the coverage that RN's get in other states (only $300,000 versus $6 million elsewhere) ...

    The liability risk for Texas RN's has to be much higher.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 19, '07
  11. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from gauge14iv
    Im laughing at the HUGE turnout there LOL
    multiply it by at least 10 to get the number of other sympathizers.....Progressives are on the march (even in Texas)
  12. by   gauge14iv
    Depends on what you consider progressive now doesn't it?
  13. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from gauge14iv
    depends on what you consider progressive now doesn't it?
    progressive:
    http://www.americanprogress.org/aboutus

    <h2>what we believe

    as progressives we believe that america should be a country of boundless opportunity--where all people can better themselves through education, hard work, and the freedom to pursue their dreams. we believe this will only be achieved with an open and effective government that champions the common good over narrow self-interest, harnesses the strength of our diversity, and secures the rights and safety of its people.
    real progress will be achieved only through innovative solutions borne of open collaboration.
    to realize our vision we must:
    build an opportunity nation where every hard-working person, regardless of background, can realize their dreams through education, decent work and fair play.
    reawaken america's conscience, our sense of shared and personal responsibility, to build healthy, vibrant communities.
    reform government so that it is of, by and for the people: open, effective, and committed to the common good.
    use america's strength to bring the world together, not pull it apart.
    in other words government of the people for the people and by the people...not government of the corporation for the corporation and by the corporation</h2>

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