Nurses rally at Texas Capitol building - page 5

Nurses rally at Texas Capitol building They devote their lives to helping patients, now they're asking for the state's help. Tuesday, dozens of nurses from across the state rallied at the State... Read More

  1. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from purplemania
    Every time I see this headline I get furious. This event was backed by a union from CALIFORNIA. The issues they raised are already part of the Texas Nurse Practice Act - which means someone did not take time to read it. Texas already has a whistleblower act, a safe harbor act, a safe patient handling act (first state to have it) and other issues. The lack of professionalism on the part of these outsiders indicates to me they are interested more in union dues than nurses. For one thing, they bill calls for changes made for SOME nurses, not all. I find this unethical. The right thing is the right thing. Thank goodness Texas is a right to work state. Even if a union were to get into my hospital I would not have to join. BTW, if this was such a great idea for nursing why aren't they picketing every capital instead of the state with such a large population of nurses?
    Precisely and thank you.

    I have never heard of anyone having a 13 patient assignment - the worst I EVER had on a med surg floor at the same time on a REALLY bad day was 8. And I had techs and a unit clerk! In the ICU I never had more than two, in the transition unit 3-4. That said - nothing is perfect - but niether are things with the ratios.

    Unions - go home.

    If you don't like Texas, go work in California.
  2. by   PrettyPillz
    Quote from spacenurse
    Nurses rally at Texas Capitol building

    They devote their lives to helping patients, now they're asking for the state's help. Tuesday, dozens of nurses from across the state rallied at the State Capitol.

    News for Austin, Texas | kvue.com | Local News
    -----------------------------------

    Link to video from TV news - keyetv.com - Registered Nurses Rally At State Capitol
    Nov 14, 2006 10:39
    Registered Nurses Rally At State Capitol

    (CBS 42) AUSTIN Hundreds of registered nurses converged on the State Capitol Tuesday morning.

    They introduced the Texas Hospital Patient Protection Act of 2007. It would set minimum nurse-to-patient staffing ratios in hospitals and emergency rooms.

    It would also give nurses the legal right to serve as patient advocates and provide protection for nurses who blow the whistle to expose unsafe conditions.

    ( MMVI, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)
    keyetv.com - Registered Nurses Rally At State Capitol
    As a Texas nurse residing in North Texas, I can definatly speak on nurse patient ratios. I worked in a Rehab hospital where it was the norm to get 9 to 15 patients. When I complained to management I was told to "get used to it". But you can have 5 patients that sounds cute on paper....They don't consider acuity at all. Whistleblower protection we have in place with Safe Harbor is toothless. While they were there I wish they mentioned disbanding Group One,The most abusive entity next to HCA ever created for Texas nurses. Texas nurses are afraid of unions. But something must be done in this state to get better conditions. We all suffer with poor patient outcomes.:angryfire
  3. by   NURSJADED
    I have never heard of anyone having a 13 patient assignment - the worst I EVER had on a med surg floor at the same time on a REALLY bad day was 8. And I had techs and a unit clerk! In the ICU I never had more than two, in the transition unit 3-4. That said - nothing is perfect - but niether are things with the ratios.

    Unions - go home.

    If you don't like Texas, go work in California.

    Don't worry. You'll be feeling the crunch very soon. We recently voted in the union in our facility in Florida and not a moment too soon. Our ratios here are 10-13 in med-surg, they're taking 7-8 on PCU and our norm in ICU is 3 pts regardless of the acuity. During one of the union meetings our nurse manager was asked to produce the criteria they use for nurse/patient ratios.. her answer? "We lost it." Needless to say, the bargaining has been very difficult. Honestly, if they say strike, I'm for it. I'm so tired of going to work everyday and putting my hard earned license on the line and having the administration tell me, "if you don't like it you can leave". So when we do get our ratios passed, and a lot of the nurses leave Texas for Florida and California.. what do you think your facilities will do? Let you keep those low ratios?
  4. by   NURSJADED
    I have never heard of anyone having a 13 patient assignment - the worst I EVER had on a med surg floor at the same time on a REALLY bad day was 8. And I had techs and a unit clerk! In the ICU I never had more than two, in the transition unit 3-4. That said - nothing is perfect - but niether are things with the ratios.

    Unions - go home.

    Wait a second... I just noticed that you speak in the past tense, like maybe you haven't been on the floor recently? Because its been in the last two years that the nurse/pt ratios have gotten completely out of hand. Are you still on the floor? Because maybe you need to go back and visit again if not. Things have changed.
  5. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from woundhealer2
    Amen to that! Texas is notoriously an employer state. You can be fired just because. And I was. I feel I was wrongly terminated and allegations arose from rumor and innuendo and guess who got canned? ME!
    I can't do a thing about it and I've spoken with several employment law attorneys that were kind enough to tell me unless you want to throw your money away and give it to me, go ahead and I'll take on your case.
    It's pitiful here how we are being walked all over and have no rights because an employer can terminate you just because. And guess what.......when the workforce commission for unemployment benefits called my HR director and read her the definition of misconduct, she could not say, yes , she had to tell her NO................I was NOT terminated for misconduct ...so now I'm collecting unemployment benefits and trying like crazy to fix my head and my heart that is completely broken over all of this. I feel so violated. So yeah bring on the unions and sign me up so no one ever has to go through the pain, heart ache and PTSD I have!!!
    Sorry off topic but thanks for letting me vent!
    Sign me,
    still in shock in TX.......actually I've gone through that stage of grief and now I'm on............well I don't know where I am in my 5 stages of grief.....maybe ANGER??!
    You have my sympathy, I too was fired, but due to reporting illegal/unethical practices to the state. I am now involved in a law suit and thank God I was protected under a GOOD state whistleblower retaliation law, and have EXCELLENT lawyers who took my case upon contingency of winning. Until there are huge labor reforms, nurses are downright FOOLISH to work without a union, I know it cant be helped now, but I think because of all the success that the CNA has had their reputation will bring back the union nation wide, its been too many years of employers having unfettered rule over the employee, time to take back some power.Vote wisley in 2008.
    Last edit by Simplepleasures on Mar 12, '07
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from PrettyPillz
    But you can have 5 patients that sounds cute on paper....They don't consider acuity at all.
    True, that can happen even with California ratios ... although there are regulations where they are supposed to take acuity into account. But, if they don't, there are other remedies for that also ... at least in California.

    You can protest the assignment as unsafe and file an incident report which, then puts the liability on the hospital, not you if something goes wrong.

    You can also give them notice that you're refusing the assignment and, if they don't remedy the problem within four hours, you can't be charged with patient abandonment after giving them that four hours notice.

    So, ratios aren't the only protections that nurses have here and I think we can give the union a lot of credit for it.

    BTW: California ratios for med surg, etc. are going down to four patients next year. So, I'm really grateful for the union getting that law passed.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 12, '07
  7. by   Nancyebg
    Funny how this is getting minimal play over at the Texas Nurses page; and here ....those keeping this going are from California, Florida, Wisconsin, etc.

    As far as Texas is concerned.......Texans know best.
    Gauge and Purplemania said it best. Can't improve on that!
  8. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from Nancyebg
    Funny how this is getting minimal play over at the Texas Nurses page; and here ....those keeping this going are from California, Florida, Wisconsin, etc.

    As far as Texas is concerned.......Texans know best.
    Gauge and Purplemania said it best. Can't improve on that!
    You noticed that too eh? :roll

    As for past tense- I visit the floors daily - it ain't changed!
  9. by   Sheri257
    I have a question for some of the Texas nurses. I've always agreed that if you guys don't want unions, that's fine. But if working conditions, nurse protections, etc. are really good in Texas, I was just wondering if you could explain something to me.

    I was just looking at NSO's nurse liability insurance rates, and something really weird is happening with Texas. Do the insurance companies know something you guys don't?

    For $100, give or take, you can buy $6 million of nurse liability coverage in states like California, New York and Florida.

    But if you're a nurse in Texas, not only does the insurance cost more ($230) but they'll only give you $300,000 in liability coverage ... maximum.

    That's only 5 percent of the liability coverage you can get if you're a nurse in other states. Why won't the insurance companies cover you at the same levels they do with nurses in other states?

    Seems like the insurance companies are saying that if you're a Texas nurse, there might be a lot more risk involved.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 18, '07
  10. by   gauge14iv
    OR...

    Thats all you need in Texas because for nurses in Texas the risk has been traditionally pretty low.

    In addition - your home is protected in Texas by the homestead exemption - you can lose almost anything else, but you can't lose your home. That may have something to do with it too.
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from gauge14iv
    OR...

    Thats all you need in Texas because for nurses in Texas the risk has been traditionally pretty low.

    In addition - your home is protected in Texas by the homestead exemption - you can lose almost anything else, but you can't lose your home. That may have something to do with it too.
    Yeah but, don't they have the homestead exemption in Florida too? And they'll give you $6 million worth of coverage in Florida ... not just $300,000.

    In my experience, insurance companies limit coverage when there's more liability exposure ... not the other way around.

    :typing
  12. by   gauge14iv
    In what experience?

    I worked for 5 years in property and casualty insurance, and I can assure you there is MUCH more to rate and limits than that.
    Last edit by gauge14iv on Mar 18, '07
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from gauge14iv
    In what experience?
    When I've bought insurance in the past. When there's more risk, they'll limit the coverage and/or charge more premiums.

    For example, my husband has diabetes. So when we bought a life insurance policy they were only willing to give him $150,000 of coverage versus $300K with the standard policy because he's at risk for dying sooner than somebody who doesn't have diabetes.

    Same when we lived in a mountain area which was high risk for fires. The premiums were higher and I couldn't get the same amount of coverage as areas that had less fires.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 18, '07

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