Nurses rally at Texas Capitol building - page 2

Nurses rally at Texas Capitol building They devote their lives to helping patients, now they're asking for the state's help. Tuesday, dozens of nurses from across the state rallied at the State... Read More

  1. by   RN34TX
    Quote from psychrn03
    It was my understanding that Group 1 is in DFW only. Have they moved to Austin?
    I've only heard of them being in DFW as well, but I wouldn't doubt that if any pictures were shot of any DFW nurses involved, they will quickly be submitted to the Group One corporate office for immediate blacklisting!

    I meant that to be funny, but now that I think about it, that really wouldn't be too unrealistic or out of their league for them to do.
  2. by   RN34TX
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Yay for those Texas nurses!

    I'm in TX and heard nothing about it.
    I got something in the mail about it a while back from CNA (and their national affiliate) saying that they were coming to Texas for this rally.

    It peaked my interest so I started a thread here about it asking if anyone else got something in the mail or knew any more about it.

    The only Texas nurses who responded to my thread and knew about it shot it down right away and wanted nothing to do with it.
  3. by   UKRNinUSA
    Quote from lizz
    As for California hospital closures, that was happening long before the ratio law took effect ... mostly because of illegal immigrants.
    I beg to differ. I am an ER nurse, I'm on the front line (so to speak). The cause of hospital and ER closures is insufficient reimbursement for services rendered to the uninsured and underinsured. Hospitals are a business. If a business can't cover the cost of it's overheads (and make a profit) it closes down. It's always easy to blame the boogie man -the illegal alien- to divert the public's attention away from the real issue.

    I found the following report. "California's Emergency Services: A System In Crisis California Medical Association 2001

    "In 1999, California's emergency care system treated 9.3 million people at one of the 356 of 567
    licensed hospitals with emergency and/or trauma departments1. This system has evolved into the
    principal safety net for health care, providing universal access to emergency and acute medical
    care for all persons irrespective of their insurance coverage or lack thereof.
    The basis for this safety net philosophy is rooted in the ethics of the healing professions and the
    traditional view that emergency care is an essential public service.
    Under state and federal law, everyone who presents at an emergency department must be
    provided with emergency care, regardless of their ability to pay. These requirements exist
    without an adequate, dedicated funding stream, and with private, third-party payment marked by
    slow- and no-payment and inappropriate downcoding of service charges. Consequently,
    emergency services have become exploited and taken for granted, and California's system, once
    the envy of the world, has become overcrowded, overwhelmed, and in danger of collapse.
    The threat to the emergency system in this state is real. Across the state, patients are enduring
    long waits, ambulances are being diverted, on-call physicians are withdrawing from hospital
    backup rosters and facilities are downgrading, closing or are in danger of closing.
    Moreover, the HMO, “make it affordable and they will come,” model for reducing the number of
    uninsured has failed to make an appreciable dent in that number, currently holding around seven
    million. This means emergency care is and will continue to be the health care service in greatest
    demand by the public, whether insured or not.
    Policymakers, opinion leaders and the general public need to be made aware of the precarious
    status of the emergency medical care system in California. It is also critical to establish an
    "Essential Public Service" designation for the system and its participants. Only then can we
    marshal the effort sufficient to strengthen and consolidate EMS activities at the statewide level
    and establish a consistent, adequate, dedicated funding stream."

    http://www.cmanet.org/upload/ERWhitePaper.pdf


    Sounds like a call for universal health insurance to me.



    (Take that, Timothy:smiley_ab)
    Last edit by UKRNinUSA on Nov 19, '06
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RN34TX
    The only Texas nurses who responded to my thread and knew about it shot it down right away and wanted nothing to do with it.
    That's why I'm surprized 200 nurses showed up at that rally. From reading this board you'd think nobody would show. I'm not saying there's a groundswell of union support in Texas but, there does seem to be at least some interest.

    :typing
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from UKRNinUSA
    I beg to differ. I am an ER nurse, I'm on the front line (so to speak). The cause of hospital and ER closures is insufficient reimbursement for services rendered to the uninsured and underinsured. Hospitals are a business. If a business can't cover the cost of it's overheads (and make a profit) it closes down. It's always easy to blame the boogie man -the illegal alien- to divert the public's attention away from the real issue.
    I see your point here. The Hospital Association of Southern California pretty much says the same thing. The problem is not all related to illegals.

    Hospital Association of Southern California / Lott on Healthcare

    Still ... with 20 percent of the uninsured population being illegals ... certainly it would help the bottom line if you could reduce that uninsured population by 20 percent. It's not an inconsequential number either.

    :typing
  6. by   purplesdk
    Just read this post. I will have to read it again and look at the links when it is not so late. I agree that there needs to be a nurse patient ratio in the hospitals and the ER's, but everyone overlooks the nursing homes. There is a tremendous need for nurse patient ratios in these LTC facilities. There is often a 1 nurse to every 20-30 patients/residents(if not more residents) on the day and evening shifts, and many times there is only 1 nurse at night for the whole facility (depending on the number of patients/recidents). I worked at a facility (at night) where I was the only nurse in the whole facility where the patient census was 50+. Not only that, but there were a few nights where I only had 2 CNA's (one for the general population and one for the locked unit). There needs to be, no, must have a chainge in nurse patient ratios for ALL types of facilities (not just the chosen few). How would you like in the many years (or not so many years) to have to be in a LTC facility where there is only one or two nurses on the floor for the whole place. I here of the nurses complaining about having to take care of 12+ patients in a hospital. Try being the only nurse for a facility and having to not only take care of 50+ patients, but do all of the required paperwork, and handle any accidents or change in conditions and a resident has to be sent to the hospital. Remember you may only have two CNA's (three if you are lucky). That's at night. During the day and evening, your butt is probably covered. The day and evening shifts usually have 5-9 CNA's, the DON and the ADON in the building to help out if need be, as well as a 2nd nurse, and rehab in the building.

    THINK ABOUT IT!!!!!!!!
  7. by   OrlandoPat
    LTC Nurse do not speak up!
    Which is one of the significant problems!
    Did you know about the "Nursing Home Staffing Act 2005"
    Did you write your Senator ?
    Did you know administrative duties do not count in the patient ratio in LTC?
    But Medicaid Medicare Reimbursement is only if you have the minimum nurse staffing ratio which goes by the dailey online payroll log to the state.
    So do you really think your DON and ADON are there to help or punch in hours to the state for your work?
  8. by   OrlandoPat
    CMS=Medicaid/Medicare designated Health Care Administration to perform the Federal Survey on LTC to enforce Minimum direct nursing care Hours.
    Healthcare Administration stated they have solved this by providing State
    Agencies how to perform this duty. Call your state-They don't, they check if its adequate by 'Initiatives' Such as=did everyone get there Flu vacination.
    Its all online, free to the public, just time consuming
    This is how direct care is calculated, CNA's are counted as nurses
    30 pts 1 LPN +2CNA=24hrs in one 8 hr shiftx 3 =72 hrs in 24 hr day divide
    by census= 2.4 which is displayed as hprd 2.4
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from purplesdk
    Just read this post. I will have to read it again and look at the links when it is not so late. I agree that there needs to be a nurse patient ratio in the hospitals and the ER's, but everyone overlooks the nursing homes. There is a tremendous need for nurse patient ratios in these LTC facilities. There is often a 1 nurse to every 20-30 patients/residents(if not more residents) on the day and evening shifts, and many times there is only 1 nurse at night for the whole facility (depending on the number of patients/recidents). I worked at a facility (at night) where I was the only nurse in the whole facility where the patient census was 50+. Not only that, but there were a few nights where I only had 2 CNA's (one for the general population and one for the locked unit). There needs to be, no, must have a chainge in nurse patient ratios for ALL types of facilities (not just the chosen few). How would you like in the many years (or not so many years) to have to be in a LTC facility where there is only one or two nurses on the floor for the whole place. I here of the nurses complaining about having to take care of 12+ patients in a hospital. Try being the only nurse for a facility and having to not only take care of 50+ patients, but do all of the required paperwork, and handle any accidents or change in conditions and a resident has to be sent to the hospital. Remember you may only have two CNA's (three if you are lucky). That's at night. During the day and evening, your butt is probably covered. The day and evening shifts usually have 5-9 CNA's, the DON and the ADON in the building to help out if need be, as well as a 2nd nurse, and rehab in the building.

    THINK ABOUT IT!!!!!!!!
    No question about it ... there needs to be ratios in LTC.

    But, quite frankly, the reason it didn't happen in California was because there aren't many RN's employed in LTC. The union was representing RN's, not LVN's and, since RN's are mostly employed in the hospitals ... that's where they focused their efforts. It took ten years just to get hospital ratios accomplished.

    If LVN's ever organized they might get ratios passed also but, I've never heard of LVN's organizing to the extent that the RN's have ... at least in California.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 30, '06
  10. by   NRSKarenRN
    texas hospital patient protection act of 2007 meetings being held across state.

    my concern is why is this not being pushed by nurses from inside the state who have to live with day to day consequences of any law passed. it's they who should be up in arms over working conditions and try to improve patient and nursing safety.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Dec 30, '06
  11. by   banditrn
    Quote from lizz
    No question about it ... there needs to be ratios in LTC.

    But, quite frankly, the reason it didn't happen in California was because there aren't many RN's employed in LTC. The union was representing RN's, not LVN's and, since RN's are mostly employed in the hospitals ... that's where they focused their efforts. It took ten years just to get hospital ratios accomplished.

    If LVN's ever organized they might get ratios passed also but, I've never heard of LVN's organizing to the extent that the RN's have ... at least in California.

    :typing
    I'm at my second LTCF after many years at the hospital. I only work part-time, and recently learned that I'm only 1 of 2 working RN's in the building - by that I mean that the remaining RN's are in administration.

    How do you get these people to organize?! Everyone seems to afraid to speak up?
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from banditrn
    How do you get these people to organize?! Everyone seems to afraid to speak up?
    I have very limited experience with the organizing part of it but, I can tell you what happened with one hospital in my area of California. It's a very conservative area ... probably not as conservative as Texas, of course, but Republican all the way.

    What it takes, IMHO ... is something really bad to happen. In this case, the hospital decided to hire a VP at $500K a year to cut costs ... including RN wages ... instead of giving the RN's a raise.

    That, combined with poor patient care issues ... really ticked off even the most conservative RN's. The RN who started it all was actually a Republican in the ICU unit and it took off from there.

    It was a really nasty fight but, the union ended up getting more than 60 percent of the vote which, was pretty remarkable since the union usually doesn't get that much of a majority in more conservative areas of the state.

    A lot of the conservative RN's even voted union ... not so much because they liked the union ... they didn't ... but, they just couldn't imagine voting for management after what they did to them.

    Three years later, the old management is gone and they're now the best paying hospital in the area. Some of the RN's are still trying to throw out the union but, with the recent union negotiated pay raise, which was significantly better than the first contract, the dissent seems to be minimal.

    So, if this is any indication ... that's what it takes ... especially in conservative areas. Something really bad has to happen.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 30, '06
  13. by   oramar
    There is a big misinformation campaign by Hospital Association in California. It seeks to pin healthcare problems in California on nurse/patient ratio laws. I have seen articles to this effect in several places.

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