Nurses oppose measure meant to ease their burden - page 18

SPRINGFIELD -- The ever-increasing demands of routine patient care are swamping some nursing homes in the state, and the Illinois General Assembly is weighing a measure designed to help them. But... Read More

  1. by   sbic56
    Quote from Kalico
    Ok...one more question and then I will leave you alone. Do most CMA's really do as much as what this CMA does or is that a rare occurance?
    Seems she has more responsibility than I have been accsutomed to seeing, but there was a med aide from Indiana who posted here a few weeks back who did ALOT in the hosptal where he was employed. He appeared to be very qualified and had alot of training; he even started IV's. Job descriptions and duties vary alot state to state, apparently. Training varies from 24 hours to 6 months of training for various med aide positions. I think there should be some stricter standards since the use of these tech will become more commonplace. Lots to talk about for sure!
  2. by   Kalico
    Quote from sbic56
    Seems she has more responsibility than I have been accsutomed to seeing, but there was a med aide from Indiana who posted here a few weeks back who did ALOT in the hosptal where he was employed. He appeared to be very qualified and had alot of training; he even started IV's. Job descriptions and duties vary alot state to state, apparently. Training varies from 24 hours to 6 months of training for various med aide positions. I think there should be some stricter standards since the use of these tech will become more commonplace. Lots to talk about for sure!
    Thank you very much. I hope that you understand I was not trying to cause an argument but I was very curious about this. I'm very grateful you took the time to answer my questions.
  3. by   massagecarepdx
    When nurses administer medications they are also assessing and educating clients, not just giving drugs. Creating Med Techs is another way for the corporations running hospitals to avoid hiring more professional, well trained, well paid nurses. It is not a measure designed to improve nursing and patient care, it is designed to boost profit and it will harm patient care.
  4. by   sbic56
    Quote from Kalico
    Thank you very much. I hope that you understand I was not trying to cause an argument but I was very curious about this. I'm very grateful you took the time to answer my questions.
    I never thought you were being argumentative at all. Glad to give my
  5. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from massagecarepdx
    When nurses administer medications they are also assessing and educating clients, not just giving drugs. Creating Med Techs is another way for the corporations running hospitals to avoid hiring more professional, well trained, well paid nurses. It is not a measure designed to improve nursing and patient care, it is designed to boost profit and it will harm patient care.

    Exactamundo!!! Well said!!
  6. by   mercyteapot
    Uh... memo to Susan Duda-whoever (I forget and don't feel like scrolling again, lol!) Dispensing medication IS a duty that "requires (our)level of education, skill and professional abilities" !
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from massagecarepdx
    When nurses administer medications they are also assessing and educating clients, not just giving drugs. Creating Med Techs is another way for the corporations running hospitals to avoid hiring more professional, well trained, well paid nurses. It is not a measure designed to improve nursing and patient care, it is designed to boost profit and it will harm patient care.
    Yep I agree. I have said it enough. I only wish more nurses would take on these concerns and tackle them.
  8. by   RMA/CNA
    I'm a CNA working at an Assisted Living facility, we to have "med techs" who took a two week course, passed the state test; and got their certification. I am in my second year of nursing school; and whenever there is a med pass by a certain "med tech" I cringe, she doesn't lock her cart, is easily distracted by other residents asking questions, leaving meds on bedside tables, b/c the residents are sleeping and she doesn't want to disturb them, or busy talking to whomever on her cell phone, I have talked with the charge nurse and administrator about this several times to no avail. I have been a CNA for 15 years, when I went to school it was for 8 months, with 6 weeks of clinicals (vs. nurse aide training nowadays!). I also have my associates degree in Medical Assisting w/ 180 hours of pharmacology (classroom/clinicals); and have worked under a doctors supervision for two years to administer medication. I have been approached by the administrator several times on how I would make a great "med tech" my response "no thanks, when I finish my degree, I'll worry about passing medication correctly" then walk away. I'm not interested in taking that chance, as much experience as I have, I don't want to risk my future and ruin my chance at being an RN in two more years...the risk is just too great...
  9. by   arelle68
    If it will save them money, corporations will do it. They will be excited about saving payroll. They won't consider the risk to the patients until the lawsuits from harmed pts start to roll. It might save them enough to make it worth the risk to them, and just carry good insurance. Then, insurance companies will refuse to cover them unless they hire licensed nurses to administer meds. Finally, they will go back to hiring nurses, get irritated at the cost, start looking for ways to cut, and the cycle will begin again with something else.

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