Nurses face rising tide of violence; now a felony to assault a nurse in 38 states - page 4

by NRSKarenRN 7,074 Views | 36 Comments Admin

Philadelphia inquirer Sunday, November 27, 201 Nurses face rising tide of violence; It's now a felony to assault a nurse by Lauren Auty, RN, BSN Read more:... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from caregiver1977
    Not quite sure why it makes a difference that it is for a relative.
    Do you have any experience caring for non-relatives - with a patient/client with whom you have only a professional relationship?

    Do you think that there is a difference in interpersonal dynamics between family members and the dynamics between strangers?
  2. 0
    Okay, part of my thinking/questioning comes from some cases I have known of, some of them being local to the area I live.

    One that stands out in particular is an elderly man who was taking someone else's child to daycare one day. He worked at a local car dealership. I guess he was so used to his daily routine that he forgot to drop of the little child and went on to his job at the dealership. I live in central Mississippi and it was during the hottest part of the summer, which can be pretty hot and humid. The child suffocated to death in his little car seat.

    No charges were filed against this man because it was deemed a true mistake. But that didn't make the child any less dead, or the parents suffer any less. Why are some things like this excused and others not? If the same kind of law that was in the OP's post was applied to the man who accidently killed a child by leaving him in the car during a hot, Mississippi day for hours then he would be in jail for life, maybe even get the death penalty.

    I have also known of older people being excused from charges of crimes they commit (most I have heard of have been behind the wheel) because they were having a medical problem at the time. Sometimes people are excused when they are having a medical problem.

    If this somehow doesn't compare to the OP's post, then please understand that I am just trying to get some understanding, not offend or argue with anyone.
  3. 1
    Yeah, caregiver1977, your argument doesn't apply here. The article is about a law addressing violence towards nurses, not about sick elders running amok. The main thrust is that anyone who assaults a nurse should have to face the same consequences as someone who assaults anyone else. This has been an interesting side trip, but is not relevant to the original article.
    Altra likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from canigraduate
    Yeah, caregiver1977, your argument doesn't apply here. The article is about a law addressing violence towards nurses, not about sick elders running amok. The main thrust is that anyone who assaults a nurse should have to face the same consequences as someone who assaults anyone else. This
    has been an interesting side trip, but is not relevant to the original article.
    And sometimes there are no charges due to the circumstances when "anyone else" is assaulted. I am in no way supporting violence against nurses! I am only saying that felony charges may not always apply with every assault.

    OMG if I have to do this much explaining I think I will juat go wash clothes and pick pecans with the kids...
  5. 2
    No one is saying that it applies to ALL cases.

    But this idea that the public has (and many have it) that ALL of the perpetrators of this violence or even the majority are somehow not in their right mind or that merely being present in the hospital means that they are stressed unduly, and should be excused from criminal behavior because of it, is simply not true.

    Most people confronted by police are under stress at that time. However, if they assault an onduty officer, they will be charged. If they have dementia or overwhelming psych issues, they may have to get treatment but will be not guilty d/t that mental issue.

    What many of us ask is the same protection for nurses. And if the perpetrator of violence is found not guilty d/t mental disease or defect, this tends to require that they receive treatment and may push many into getting the treatment that they need.

    If we perpetually let these things go, those that need treatment rarely get it and those that are violent without mental issues, take it as a free pass to beat up on health care providers.

    As matter of note, even for overly "stressed" individuals or those with dementia that have violent tendencies, many will choose to act out on some individuals and not others. Picking out those that are less likely to defend themselves.
    RNfaster and caregiver1977 like this.
  6. 1
    The other issue, is that these articles often focus on the ER. And the public responds with, "what did you expect with working in the ER?". First, this violence occurs all over the hospital, not just the ER. Second, does anyone ever tell police, well, you were working in a bad neighborhood.....you should just expect this treatment and shut up and take it? You should work the good neighborhoods only.
    Altra likes this.
  7. 0
    I think it is important to keep in mind that you have to want the person to get arrested before it happens. Just like when someone shoplifts, they may, or may not, call the police to handle the situation.


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