Nurses Embracing iPhones - page 3

by JRP1120, RN

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By Debra Wood, RN, contributor June 23, 2011 - Long a physician favorite, iPhones are making their mark as helpful nursing tools as well. Nurses are embracing the iPhone and its ability to improve communication and access... Read More


  1. 0
    My iPhone, Davey, is the best! I unlocked and jailbroke this baby. <-super proud about that. And honestly I can't survive without it. I have a dictionary on mine because my spelling is horrible. Plus notes, a daily check list of things I need to do, alarms for different times when meds are due, etc. It's funny the other day we went to a presentation and I was typing my notes on my iPhone and my boss kept giving me funny looks. When we finished and were walking back he saw that I was still typing on it and asked if someone was texting me so I showed him my notes. He commended me for being tech savvy.
    Davey and I will be together forever...or until I buy a new version of Davey!
  2. 0
    I can see in the near future the use of ipads and other technology to bring better nursing to the bedside. Desktop computers are nice but cumbersome. Hospitals should realize this is the future for bedside nursing and embrace it. I have been having a difficult time with my hospital to open up the WiFi they have installed here. It is open to patients, visitors and MDs who request it. Employees are left out looking in. I know they have a concern on abusing the system amd I concur they do have a concern, but what difference is there when they use one of the desktops. They are using the WiFi as a gateway to the internet and not downloading malware, spyware or viruses on hospital controled devices. Nurses have the oppurtunity to access large amounts of information to not only help patients but also to make them better nurses.
  3. 0
    It took me a while, but I've embraced the whole "iPhone at work" thing. I have one whole page dedicated to work apps...

    Shift worker, Calculator, iMIMS, Lab Tests, Med Abbreviations, Eponyms, Unit Conversions, ICU Pearls, ALS Study, Epocrates, Medscape, ECG Guide, Pedi STAT, Flashcards, Contraction timer, Hangman (ok, that last one is just for fun, its based on medical terminology)

    Wish we had access to the wi-fi network, because the only thing that stops me from using it sometimes is the amount of data i know I'll consume. Considering we now don't even have access to the internet, just the intranet, it's nice to access sources that are more efficient and reliable than what big brother says I can look at.

    Yay for technology!
  4. 0
    Quote from SkipBeat
    Management: No phones allowed!

    Nurse: But I use epocrates so I can look up meds I don't know!

    Management: No phones allowed. Use the computer that is never available because we didn't buy enough. Or that outdated drug book at the reference desk that won't have that new drug your looking for.

    Nurse: ?????

    That's kinda how the conversation went when I wanted to use my droid phone to look up meds.
    LMAO

    When it comes to "texting on the job", our manager is the biggest culprit.
  5. 0
    Quote from parko
    It took me a while, but I've embraced the whole "iPhone at work" thing. I have one whole page dedicated to work apps...

    Shift worker, Calculator, iMIMS, Lab Tests, Med Abbreviations, Eponyms, Unit Conversions, ICU Pearls, ALS Study, Epocrates, Medscape, ECG Guide, Pedi STAT, Flashcards, Contraction timer, Hangman (ok, that last one is just for fun, its based on medical terminology)

    Wish we had access to the wi-fi network, because the only thing that stops me from using it sometimes is the amount of data i know I'll consume. Considering we now don't even have access to the internet, just the intranet, it's nice to access sources that are more efficient and reliable than what big brother says I can look at.

    Yay for technology!
    I've only had my (probably obsolete by now) notebook computer for six months, having been dragged, kicking and screaming, away from my paper-and-pen. I still miss the library's index/reference card system ( now THERE'S a hotbed for germs, eh?). Anyway, your 2nd paragraph made my eyes whirl around and my brain spin!!!! If I ever 'get' even half of that I'll consider myself quite accomplished. It's a whole new language!
  6. 0
    Been a PDA geek for ages (see also: PalmPilot Professional, 1997), and now carry an iPod Touch. I'll probably wind up migrating to an iPhone as soon as I reach my mobile provider's renewal/upgrade date. (Our management is generally pretty decent about letting you use a smartphone as a PDA, they just don't want you texting or goofing off on Facebook during shift hours.) Lots of our younger nurses, and a few of the "old hands," have already gone the iPhone/Android route. It's incredibly useful to be able to whip fifteen different references out of your pocket at a second's notice. (Case in point: Lexi-Comp's IV compatibility checker has saved me untold headaches. If I'm in the middle of a resus, and I have five or six IV push meds and four drips to hang on two PIVs, I don't have time to be hunting through MicroMedex or haggling on the phone with Pharmacy.)

    Clinical stuff I have loaded: Lexi-Comp (drug books and IV compatibility), Skyscape (5MCC, Harriet Lane, Detroit Receiving EM Handbook, Anesthesia Quick Reference), Pedi STAT, ECG Guide, and the Fast Facts series (Critical Care, Peds Critical, Trauma Care).
  7. 0
    I liked to see my doctor whip out his iphone and battery extending case and look something up at my bedside. He didn't know and he didn't guess he found out right there. It was great.

    I hope my new facility allows me to utilize either my Samsung Galaxy Tab and/or my iPhone as they can both be quiet helpful.
  8. 0
    Smart phones on the floor are great! You can look up meds, do calculations, all kinds of stuff!
    What they actually get used for? Facebook and texting gossip.
    Most nurses I work with look at a drug book, use a calculator or use the hospital computer for any research they need.
  9. 0
    I've pulled out my Droid at a patient's bedside to look up the answer to their question. They don't seem to mind. Better to have a nurse look up the answer than guess. Unfortunately we have a new policy forbidding use of phones on the floor so I guess I won't be able to do that anymore.
  10. 0
    Old Rules + New Technology= this prediction----one day hospitals will realize that it would be to their advantage to allow nurses to use the cellphone apps that are coming out faster than we can blink; thay still won't trust personnel not to tweet, take 'secret' photos or whatever other mischief one can get into, so they will issue 'closed-system' apps that piggy-back onto house pagers, and the whole thing will be ungainly and obsolete a week before everyone figures out how to use them. Then there will be a period of time in which some techie is called in to tweak and fine-tune; after wasting two-and-a-half years on this, the ban on cell/smart-phones will be rescinded, but by then the NEWER technology uses your watch and an earpiece, so THOSE items will be banned ,since no one will be able to tell if you're working or watching the new WATCH-FLIX movie app.......and on + on & on.......


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