Nurses cope with increasing job pressures

  1. Nurses have a name for their problem of faster, more complicated work: complexity compression. Now they want to fix it.

    Star Tribune - Minnesota
    December 17, 2006
    H.J. Cummins


    Nurses cope with increasing job pressures

    :spin:
    Last edit by xptp29a on Dec 18, '06
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   xptp29a
    Paperwork and documentation taking upwards of 40% of a nurses time... Does that sound accurate for all of you? Is it more or less in a certain area of the country or is this pretty standard across the board? It sounds like it will only get worse before it gets any better.
  4. by   oramar
    40% is a very good estimate. It seems like every week there is a new form to fill out.
  5. by   RN BSN 2009
    :angryfire
  6. by   UM Review RN
    What's worse is, many of these required forms are so time-consuming that their existence creates a time crunch for the nurse to document nurse's notes.

    Ever notice that when a new form is generated, it is always blamed on JCHAO?

    Sometimes I feel like nurses are treated like hamsters on a wheel--faster, faster, faster!!

    People need to face the fact that no one person can possibly do all the things nurses are expected to do in one shift.
  7. by   nurseangel47
    Seems that SOMEONE would get a clue and make an entire living in streamlining standardized forms that JCHAO would approve. And/or software that has the stamp of approval if that is used widespread enough.
    And have mandatory clerical assistance ON THE UNIT 24/7 on all units that could be downloading, printing, and/or pulling, copying the needed forms you need upon transferring, discharging, sending out to the ED, etc. which would cut down some on the nurses's having to run around like a demon often leaving some other task hanging in the balance while she/he stops and gets this thing done. Can be sooo frustrating. The chance for changes for the BETTER are often ignored and it seems to fall on deaf ears when management (IF management, rather) comes to us for idea storming. Why don't they listen to the troops on the front line, anyway? I'm sure that most of us with the experience could streamline those annoying bits of paperwork and find a generic alternative and like I said, with proper clerical help, be more efficient and less frazzled at what we do.
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]in my hospital, every time someone identifies a problem, the answer is to throw more paperwork at it. we do our charting on-line, but often have dozens of paper forms in the chart in addition: a heparin protocol, a ventilator weaning bundle, a transport checklist, a pre-op checklist, checklists for each unit of blood we give (in a surgical unit!), transfer checklists -- even a checklist to make sure we have all the appropriate check lists in the chart! it's pretty damned overwhelming. i once suggested that when adding a new form for us to fill out, they needed to subtract an old one. you'd think i'd advocated euthanasia from the chewing out i got!

    hospitals are trying to save money by eliminating ancillary personnel, and that just adds task to the nurse's already busy day. having to clean the room between patients or run to the pharmacy three floors down and two buildings over for a missing med plus dealing with all the additional paperwork -- is it any wonder nurses are leaving? there is little time to actually be with the patients, yet we're evaluated on our patients' reviews. "do you feel that your nurse had enough time for you?" well, no, but . . .
  9. by   usyankee
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    What's worse is, many of these required forms are so time-consuming that their existence creates a time crunch for the nurse to document nurse's notes.

    Ever notice that when a new form is generated, it is always blamed on JCHAO?

    Sometimes I feel like nurses are treated like hamsters on a wheel--faster, faster, faster!!

    People need to face the fact that no one person can possibly do all the things nurses are expected to do in one shift.
    I have been in LTC for 18 years. When a patient falls, instead of having one paper to fill out, we now have 10. In the past, if the patient was oriented and could tell you they did not hit their head, you didn't have to do both V/S & neuros. Now, whether the patient is oriented or not, if you didn't see them fall, you have to do neuros, V/S etc/ And of course you didn't see them fall...you were probably pushing pills or doing paperwork.

    We also are required in the middle of our med pass to pass out dinner trays and feed. During dinner we have to go on a different floor to pick up the patients from the hairdressers. And many times she calls ahead of time, so you have to wait until she is done. In the middle of a med pass!

    If the CNA needs a different item to someone's diet, they don't call the kitchen...the nurse does. If we get Coumadin & PT/INR orders or other paperwork at that time, it has to wait. We have to observe all patient hoyer or 2 person tranfers. Still, all the while trying to do our med pass! Nursing duties are pushed aside constantly for our nonnursing duties.

    Years ago your med pass was sacred and inviolable. We used to have signs on our med carts: Do NOT disturb the nurse unless it's an emergency. NOW, they have NO respect...NONE of interrupting you constantly. It's a wonder there are not more med errors than there are!
    Last edit by usyankee on Nov 11, '07
  10. by   lindarn
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    What's worse is, many of these required forms are so time-consuming that their existence creates a time crunch for the nurse to document nurse's notes.

    Ever notice that when a new form is generated, it is always blamed on JCHAO?

    Sometimes I feel like nurses are treated like hamsters on a wheel--faster, faster, faster!!

    People need to face the fact that no one person can possibly do all the things nurses are expected to do in one shift.
    "We the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful.
    We have gone so long, with so little, that we are now qualified to do anything with nothing".

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  11. by   gennavieve
    Same as stated above (LTC) facility and now they want us to not only clear the tables and stack the dishes but also to rinse the dishes and put them in the crate so all the cook does is put the crate in the dishwasher. This is with 41 residents and one nurse and one cna. Of course, in the meantime we are answering the door aand phones, passing meds etc. Welcome to OUR WORLD. I stay because I love my residents. they are like my extended family sooooooo, you do what you have to for their sake not the cooperation, by any means !!!!! Thank you for listening, Gennavieve

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