Nurse Strangles Intruder With Bare Hands - page 5

What a story! Last night in Portland, Oregon a 56 year old nurse came home to find an intruder in her house. I think he had a hammer? She strangled him with her bare hands! He is dead. I'm sure... Read More

  1. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    I am so glad that she was able to kill him.

    I have no sympathy for a home invader. If it had been me, I would have pulled my .38 from my pocket, shot all 5 bullets into his head, reloaded, and held it on his body until the cops came. I have had my home broken into before. With me in it. This was before I carried a gun.

    I say more power to her. She's a very brave woman as well as a hero.
  2. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    I am absolutely stunned that so many "educated" people are referring to this as MURDER. No... murder was what HE might have had in mind. What she did was self-defense. She is not a murderer in any sense of the word. She is a hero, pure and simple. She saved her own life and probably those of future victims. This story might also cause criminals to think twice before breaking into the next house.

    I agree that what she's gone through has to be unbelievably traumatic. Those who have their doubts over her apparent calmness need to remember that shock can manifest itself in many ways. I know I would be in shock had that happened to me.

    God forbid, if anything like this ever happens to me, I hope I have the strength to do what this brave nurse did.
  3. by   medsurgnurse
    Hey remember we're nurses. A person in shock can appear very calm. The neighbor not knowing about shock states, interpreted it as calmness.
  4. by   MMARN
    Quote from catlady
    While I'm thrilled that the nurse is ok, I don't think this is anything to cheer about. The whole thing is scary and sad, and she's going to have to live with the fact that she took a life, regardless of how justified she might have been.
    I agree. I was a bit appalled at the response the story was getting. This is a horrible story. While she heals, she had to kill to survive. It's not exactly the best oxymoron. Terrible story.
    Last edit by MMARN on Sep 10, '06
  5. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from Daytonite
    While my first reaction to hearing this story was shock, then, good for this nurse, upon further thought I'm now thinking that this might not be such a good situation for all of nursing or this nurse in particular. The media is going to have a field day with this. This is going to be used to justify every bad thing the public has ever heard about nurses.

    I also feel very, very sorry for the nursing professional as a whole. This is not good publicity for us at all. We're supposed to be supporters of life, not takers of it, even when it happens accidentally through malpractice. Unfortunately, I think this poor sod is always going to be seen by the media as being right up there with Nurse Ratchet.
    First, this was not "malpractice". Malpractice does not even come in, here.

    Second, what is bad about this for nursing? Other than a sad death, it is a matter of dispute that it is "bad" for our image.

    I personally have gratitude that a fellow nurse was more than able to defend herself from a known and convicted criminal. There are threads here about nurses being afraid to have their full name on their badge, or address listed because they are afraid of retaliation by patients. There are stories of nurses being assaulted. And when one of us manages to defend herself, some see it as a "bad" thing for nurses.

    There are all these comments about how suspicious it is that she is calm and collected....would we say the same if she were a 210lb male paramedic or an MD?

    Since when is it better for nurses and their image to be hysterical or a victim, rather than a calm cool defender?
  6. by   augigi
    The point is, her being a nurse is irrelevant and I hardly think bad for the profession nor anything to do with malpractice or Nurse Ratchet...??!

    She defended herself against an intruder armed with a weapon in her house. He lost, she survived. Nothing to cheer about as a man is dead, but good for her for doing what she had to do in order to survive.

    This is not murder, as murder is a legal term requiring motive and intent. This appears to be self-defense, but I would be a lot of money that she will never see the inside of a police station, let alone a court.
  7. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from caroladybelle
    First, this was not "malpractice". Malpractice does not even come in, here.

    Second, what is bad about this for nursing? Other than a sad death, it is a matter of dispute that it is "bad" for our image.

    I personally have gratitude that a fellow nurse was more than able to defend herself from a known and convicted criminal. There are threads here about nurses being afraid to have their full name on their badge, or address listed because they are afraid of retaliation by patients. There are stories of nurses being assaulted. And when one of us manages to defend herself, some see it as a "bad" thing for nurses.

    There are all these comments about how suspicious it is that she is calm and collected....would we say the same if she were a 210lb male paramedic or an MD?

    Since when is it better for nurses and their image to be hysterical or a victim, rather than a calm cool defender?
    :yeahthat:
  8. by   casi
    Quote from Daytonite
    I do know one thing. If I had been in this nurses' shoes and survived this, I would have been shaking, crying and barely able to even crawl over to a neighbor's house.
    I'll say this, you don't know how you'll react to this kind of situation until your in it. At the sweet and innocent (smirk) age of 17 I happened to stumble across a body in the dumpster at work (turned out to be a passed out drunk thank god) by the shear and absolute shock I was in I managed to remain extremely calm as I walked back into work to tell my coworkers. I think it took a good 10 minutes for what I saw to sink in and for me to lose it. There's a good chance that she was calm because reality hadn't sunk in yet.

    I'm glad that this nurse didn't become just another victim. I do worry that taking a life in self defense may be hard for her to cope with, but at the end of the day she did what she had to do to protect herself.
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I worry about PTSD and its effect on her life and future, frankly. This situation will haunt her for years. I am glad she was able to defend herself, and lived to tell----but make no mistake, she will have problems with this for years to come, unless she gets help.
  10. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from tntrn
    But if that "intruder" is also armed with a deadly weapon with clear intentions of harming you, must you then retreat? What hogwash! Please, let me know what states have stupid laws like that and I'll make sure to never go there.
    Some states say that you can only use force in proportion to the one you're facing.

    i.e., for instance: You can't use deadly force if someone slaps you or verbally abuses you.


    As to this incident on hand:

    I applaud the nurse's decision to defend herself. I am sick and tired of being "advised" to bend over and take it everytime some two bit thug steals my cash, property or dignity.

    Yes, she was a nurse. But she's a human being first.
    Touch my property without my permission, you better be prepared to face the consequences.


    "Better be judged by 12 than be carried by 6"

    cheers,
  11. by   Maverick80
    PORTLAND, Oregon (AP) -- A nurse returning from work discovered an intruder armed with a hammer in her home and strangled him with her bare hands, police said.


    http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/09/08/nur...cnn_topstories
    Last edit by sirI on Sep 11, '06 : Reason: edited due to copyright law
  12. by   weetziebat
    Woo Hoo!!! We got us some strong, brave nurses here in Oregon!

    I cannot imagine strangling someone to death with my bare hands. Boy, the adrenaline must have been pumping. And to confront a man who already had a hammer by his side!? She either didn't stop to think, is extraordinarily brave or (hate to say it) dumb for doing such a thing.

    But have to say I sure am glad Mr. Haffey won't be around to continue his life of crime. Yes, 'Hurray for Susan'!!!
  13. by   nursemary9
    Hi

    I completely agree with Weetzie!!

    I have to say that when I first saw the Headline in our Chicago paper, & I had not yet read the nurses name, I immediately thought of our Weetzie!!

    Mary Ann

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