Nurse refused to give CPR - page 5

"Nurse refused to give CPR to elderly woman who later died" Have you guys seen this? It's quickly making national news. What would you do in this situation? Also, in your experience is it... Read More

  1. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    1
    If you listen to the whole thing the facility says they DO NOT EMPLOY NURSES so why is everyone insisting this lady is a nurse and WHY did she identify herself that way?????

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
    nrsang97 likes this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  barbyann profile page
    2
    It seems the policy is to call 911 for emergent situations. Why call 911 and then not use their advice? Makes no sense to not help EMS by doing whatever they ask. I know of places that have the 911 rule, and these facilities do that to avoid paying for training (CPR) the staff. The rule is call 911 and do what they say till EMS arrives. I can't imagine a no CPR rule....
    nrsang97 and dishes like this.
  4. Visit  jmll1765 profile page
    0
    Quote from barbyann
    It seems the policy is to call 911 for emergent situations. Why call 911 and then not use their advice? Makes no sense to not help EMS by doing whatever they ask. I know of places that have the 911 rule, and these facilities do that to avoid paying for training (CPR) the staff. The rule is call 911 and do what they say till EMS arrives. I can't imagine a no CPR rule....

    Yes..what she said! Why would she even identify herself as a nurse if she wasn't going to do anything? And do you think for one minute when the poo hits the fan that this facility will stand behind this nurse? Policy or no..they will let her burn and odds are that she will have a very difficult time finding another job. She will forever be known as the nurse who refused to do CPR.
    Last edit by jmll1765 on Mar 3, '13
  5. Visit  Creamsoda profile page
    3
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    We assisted-living nurse are caught between a rock and a hard place. Many companies, including the one I work for, have the no-CPR rule in place, supposedly for the nurse's protection as well as theirs. I'd probably lose my job if I were to perform CPR while waiting for the EMTs to arrive. But when it comes down to brass tacks, failure to rescue is a serious matter that the state BON does not view favorably, and frankly if I were in that situation, my training and moral code would dictate that I start CPR. It's not even a question in my mind. Far better to lose a job than a life that could have been saved with early CPR and advanced care.
    OK so you call 911, the 911 operator has taken over now, they are instructing you to do CPR, they are now liable. Why wouldnt you do CPR? I am actually truly amazed at how many of you on this board actually think twice about this! This is an asinine policy. What if the groundskeeper, or the "nurse" that worked there suddenly dropped dead, im sure someone would be doing CPR on her. I hope the facility gets investigated and that nurse fired. Even if she did get fired had she done CPR, I can bet you could take legal action over that "policy".

    The lady was a DNR, not breathing, you do what the operator tells you to do. Start the darn CPR.

    Ugg, I hate society. No one has brains anymore.
    iheartcats, Hygiene Queen, and dishes like this.
  6. Visit  netglow profile page
    7
    Calling 911 in no way suggests that the caller wants to participate in hands on medical care. It just means that they called to bring EMS to the sick/injured person - that EMS will handle the medical situation. This IS helping as far as lay people are concerned.

    Now, makes no sense to us, but we are medical professionals. Not every person out there wants to get that involved - I don't see this as shocking at all. It's not an abnormal response, at all. I would like to think that there are more people who would do the hands on if instructed, than those who would not choose to. But hey, I'm all about reality...
  7. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    2
    If facility policy is not to initiate BLS or ALS then the staff did precisely the correct thing.
    psu_213 and elkpark like this.
  8. Visit  Rachelj1222 profile page
    0
    I dont understand how somebody can work for a facility like that. Disgusting.
  9. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    In an hour of googling, I found cpr for pedi only.
  10. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    8
    Quote from netglow
    I agree. Really most of the time, it doesn't matter who actually was involved, they will call that person "a nurse". Could have been a housekeeper for all we know.
    *** The called self identifies as a nurse. She says "I'm a nurse". She had better be an LVN or RN or she could get in trouble.
    psu_213, Lev <3, nrsang97, and 5 others like this.
  11. Visit  roser13 profile page
    3
    Quote from dishes
    You don't have to be in medical facility to receive CPR, if this lady (the deceased) had been in a restaurant, public building, a shopping mall she would have received CPR as instructed by the 911 operator.
    THIS!!
    nrsang97, Fuzzy, and Creamsoda like this.
  12. Visit  Mulan profile page
    17
    I don't see a tragedy here, as someone stated.

    The woman was 87 years old.

    The daughter, a nurse, had no problem with it, probably realizing that it was her time to die. We all have to die sometime.

    The dispatcher, "if you've got any sitting citizens there, I'll have them do it", what is she going to do, talk another resident, another 80 year old, through doing CPR?
    16weeks, WeepingAngel, psu_213, and 14 others like this.
  13. Visit  roser13 profile page
    1
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    We assisted-living nurse are caught between a rock and a hard place. Many companies, including the one I work for, have the no-CPR rule in place, supposedly for the nurse's protection as well as theirs. I'd probably lose my job if I were to perform CPR while waiting for the EMTs to arrive. But when it comes down to brass tacks, failure to rescue is a serious matter that the state BON does not view favorably, and frankly if I were in that situation, my training and moral code would dictate that I start CPR. It's not even a question in my mind. Far better to lose a job than a life that could have been saved with early CPR and advanced care.
    For those of us without ALF experience, could you shed some light on the thought process behind a "no CPR" rule?
    nrsang97 likes this.
  14. Visit  mwrizRN profile page
    0
    Clearly this is an upsetting story, but this is not an uncommon practice at these specific type of facilities.. These company's are doing away with mandating CPR certification for its staff d/t the cost and liabilities that ensue.
    I'm sure that this situation wasn't easy for the nurse involved to just sit there and watch this women suffer but she also works for a company and per this companies policy she was restricted to perform her duty as an RN and attempt to save her life d/t the possibility of losing her job.
    It's a scary situation when you can't even perform CPR on a resident or civilian without the fear of being sued or fired....sad sad situation.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top