Nurse refused to give CPR - page 46

"Nurse refused to give CPR to elderly woman who later died" Have you guys seen this? It's quickly making national news. What would you do in this situation? Also, in your experience is it... Read More

  1. Visit  QuietRiot profile page
    0
    Why would she impede others from helping the resident? If she didn't want to perform CPR that's her business, but to hinder others from doing so is deplorable!!
  2. Visit  QuietRiot profile page
    1
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Assisted living facilities ARE NOT LICENSED to provide nursing care in most states; they can provide personal care assistance only: bathing, grooming, dressing, meals, assist mobility, housekeeping. Home care agencies are often called in when resident needs wound care, new colostomy, multiple falls, post hospital stay, etc.

    Per Assisted Living Federation of America:

    I can make a strong argument that CPR is not exclusively "nursing care" or "medical care" As anyone (regardless of background) that completes a 2hr course and pays $40 can become certified in CPR. People who are in non healthcare related fields perform CPR under the first-aid umbrella until professional help arrives.
    Fuzzy likes this.
  3. Visit  Fuzzy profile page
    0
    I have to be trained in both animal and human CPR as a requirement for my current position. I'm a veterinary technician.
    Fuzzy
  4. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    1
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Assisted living facilities ARE NOT LICENSED to provide nursing care in most states; they can provide personal care assistance only: bathing, grooming, dressing, meals, assist mobility, housekeeping. Home care agencies are often called in when resident needs wound care, new colostomy, multiple falls, post hospital stay, etc.

    Per Assisted Living Federation of America:
    I get your argument, but bystander CPR is not "nursing care". By definition it's an intervention that requires no specific level of experience or license.
    QuietRiot likes this.
  5. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    3
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I've never worked in long term care and I know nothing about the legalities of "code" vs "no code" facilities. What I do know is having both a mother and a mother-in-law with advanced dementia. I've had four blood uncles, a grandmother, a great-grandfather and a mother with Alzheimer's. If there is such a thing as a "no code" facility, THAT'S where I would put my relatives. My mother and my uncles watched their grandfather die of what is remarkably similar to what Alzheimer's looks like. They, and I watched my grandmother go through it and I have watched my mother and four of her six (the other two died before the age of 50) brothers die by inches of Alzheimer's. Not one of them wanted to LIVE with the disease after they realized what was happening to them. Not one them would want to be coded.

    I have also watched my father, his father and mother and his grandfather die of various cancers . . . not one of them would want to be coded as well. If there is such a thing as a "no code" facility, I'd applaud it. The only reservation I have about the facility described is that the nurses would call 911 and hope like hell they arrived before the resident had the chance to die peacefully in his or her bed.
    I completely agree so long as it's consistent; don't call someone else to perform CPR but not start it yourself, effectively just delaying CPR. This only creates a situation where the patient may physically survive but with ever worse neurological functioning.

    Either start CPR right away or never start it, one or the other.
    Christy1019, heron, and SquishyRN like this.

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