Nurse refused to give CPR - page 3

by flexiseal

63,081 Views | 489 Comments

"Nurse refused to give CPR to elderly woman who later died" Have you guys seen this? It's quickly making national news. What would you do in this situation? Also, in your experience is it common for assisted living... Read More


  1. 4
    I'm speechless.
    LDRNMOMMY, Isitpossible, nrsang97, and 1 other like this.
  2. 2
    Here's the deal so far:

    Apparently this complex houses two different sorts of facilities. One is Glenwood Gardens Skilled Nursing Facility, the other is Glenwood Gardents "Retirement" community which is an independent living facility. The difference is the former offers skilled nursing care whilst the latter does not. The elderly woman who passed on lived in the independent living building that did not provide medical care and according to managment she and her family were aware of that fact when she became a resident.

    The question is, and the one *not* being answered is why the nurse in question was in the non-nursing building? Management has refused to say nor provide a written copy to the media of their policies regarding these sort of situations.

    IMHO two likely reasons for this "nurse" to have been where she was is either she was summoned by someone who saw the woman in distress, or she simply happened to be in the building/area for personal or other reasons when things went down.
    Dramatic 911 tape reveals dispatcher’s fight to save patient; nurse refuses to help; Link here to hear the tape | KGET TV 17
    netglow and Altra like this.
  3. 1
    I was just talking to my husband yesterday about a case that occurred on the new series Monday Mornings. There was a 15 year old girl who needed pericardialcentesis. Both she and the parents refused it due to religious beliefs even though the girl will die. The Doctor did it anyway. I turned to my husband and said "You know how I always say you never really know what you would do in a situation until you're in it. Well I would like to think that I would attempt to save the persons life even if it meant I could lose my job or license." Same thing in this case.I might think 'maybe God made me a nurse so that I would be in this situation and help save this life when someone else might have refused to.' But who knows what I'd really do in that situation.
    herring_RN likes this.
  4. 6
    The 911 operator was really aggravated by this! She sounded more caring than the nurse!! I understand that it is policy not to perform CPR but this nurse was so cold! She should have handed the phone to someone else at least!
    SopranoKris, Orca, nrsang97, and 3 others like this.
  5. 6
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Here's the deal so far:

    Apparently this complex houses two different sorts of facilities. One is Glenwood Gardens Skilled Nursing Facility, the other is Glenwood Gardents "Retirement" community which is an independent living facility. The difference is the former offers skilled nursing care whilst the latter does not. The elderly woman who passed on lived in the independent living building that did not provide medical care and according to managment she and her family were aware of that fact when she became a resident.

    The question is, and the one *not* being answered is why the nurse in question was in the non-nursing building? Management has refused to say nor provide a written copy to the media of their policies regarding these sort of situations.

    IMHO two likely reasons for this "nurse" to have been where she was is either she was summoned by someone who saw the woman in distress, or she simply happened to be in the building/area for personal or other reasons when things went down.
    Dramatic 911 tape reveals dispatcher’s fight to save patient; nurse refuses to help; Link here to hear the tape | KGET TV 17
    I don't really care why she was where she was. Simply as a human being, to stand there and refuse to come to the aid of another human being, perhaps out of fear of job loss, just renders me speechless.

    And if it turns out she actually IS a nurse, well then, shame on her. She doesn't deserve to call herself a nurse.
    miszsantiago, Orca, herring_RN, and 3 others like this.
  6. 4
    Quote from dishes
    The facilities' policy not to initiate CPR is unlawful under EMS law. Law trumps policy, facilities and nurses who don't understand this should be reported to the board and re-educated.
    There is no "EMS" law. It is the bystanders right to refuse to perform CPR, for any reason. Is it morally and ethically right? In my opinion no.

    I can't comment on the Nurse refusing to do CPR and standing by that refusal by saying it is her facilities policy. I can only say what I would do. The Nurse involved is going to have deal with the consequences, whether it is through legal ramifications due to her license and the State Practice Act or through moral and personal convictions.
  7. 11
    There is more to this story. This article from USnews Nurse refuses to perform CPR despite 911 dispatcher's plea - U.S. News states the daughter is a nurse and is satisfied with the care that her mother received. They asked the CEO and he stated that there this is a non nursing residential facility and there are NO nurses available to provide this kind of care and the all families are aware of this policy.

    I am very curious what the outcome will be....but as usual we will probably never know. I doubt it was a "real nurse" and I am curious about residential facilities regulations and obligations. I wwonder how they prevent CPR when a passer by can perform CPR.....this is not the whole story and I doubt this person is a real nurse.
    Orca, Skips, llg, and 8 others like this.
  8. 6
    Holding a nursing license does not require someone to be currently (or ever) certified in BLS, to my knowledge. While this point is unlikely to be explained to the general public in the media coverage, I doubt there are any grounds for this nurse to be disciplined by the BON.
    psu_213, Orca, AZMOMO2, and 3 others like this.
  9. 1
    I agree with you healthstar, " she should have handed the phone to someone else" as anyone can perform CPR and the nurse obstructed the law when she refused to hand the phone over to a" passer by or gardener, anyone", as the 911 operator prompted. My guess is the 911 operator and first responders will file complaints to the BON, the facility policies will be reviewed by a lawyer and staff will be re-educated regarding their legal obligations.
    jadelpn likes this.
  10. 2
    altra you do not need to be certified in BLS to do CPR, a 911 operator can talk anyone through it, that is why the operator kept asking the nurse to hand the phone off to a passerby, the gardener, anyone.
    nrsang97 and roser13 like this.


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