Nurse refused to give CPR - page 2

by flexiseal

55,745 Unique Views | 489 Comments

"Nurse refused to give CPR to elderly woman who later died" Have you guys seen this? It's quickly making national news. What would you do in this situation? Also, in your experience is it common for assisted living... Read More


  1. 0
    Just saw this on Good Morning America and while the 911 operator sounded frantic the nurse in question was cool as ice.

    Each time the 911 operator asked her to perform CPR the nurse said "no", when asked if she would find anyone else at the facility to perform CPR on the lady again the response was "no", and "we are not allowed to perform CPR on residents". The 911 operator grows increasingly fustrated and desparate asking if the nurse would pass the telephone to a passerby, anyone on the street, *anyone* that they could instruct on how to perform CPR to "keep this lady from dying" and again the response was "no".

    Nurse Refuses to Perform CPR on Dying Woman at Retirement Home | KTLA 5
  2. 4
    Quote from RNperdiem
    Until I know all the facts, it is hard to decide what to believe.
    There is more missing in this story than what is being told.
    Listen to the 911 call. The woman called herself a nurse (although we all know how that goes) and she literally refused multiples times to even hand the phone to a passer-by (there was one) who might have been willing to initiate CPR.

    For the "nurse's" sake, I hope she really doesn't have a license to lose.
    Not_A_Hat_Person, Orca, nrsang97, and 1 other like this.
  3. 4
    The Article stated the woman wasn't DNR. And if someone is not adequately breathing, starting CPR is the best outcome; breathing I adequately=lack of O2----> Start CPR per new AHA guidelines...100bpm per the tune of "Staying Alive".

    THIS is truly sticky, AND awful!!! The article had enough in it for me to surmise that the facility policy was in place, however, the nurses license would've protected her; she didn't want to lose her job, I'm guessing, but was hoping that they would get there in time. 911 had their hands tied, they could jump through the phone and save the lady.

    The policy is an awful one. I'm wondering what is to come from the aftermath of the investigation, from the state's health department.
    Lev <3, Orca, nrsang97, and 1 other like this.
  4. 10
    Yeah. But everybody calls themselves "nurse" these days. UAPs, secretaries, vet techs... so we'll have to see.
  5. 0
    Quote from roser13

    Listen to the 911 call. The woman called herself a nurse (although we all know how that goes) and she literally refused multiples times to even hand the phone to a passer-by (there was one) who might have been willing to initiate CPR.

    For the "nurse's" sake, I hope she really doesn't have a license to lose.
    Link for 911 call?
  6. 0
  7. 11
    The facilities' policy not to initiate CPR is unlawful under EMS law. Law trumps policy, facilities and nurses who don't understand this should be reported to the board and re-educated.
    miszsantiago, Orca, tewdles, and 8 others like this.
  8. 3
    Quote from ChristineN
    Link for 911 call?
    Posted a link to the 911 call above.

    The "nurse" on the telephone identified herself quite strongly as a *nurse* during the call even telling off the 911 operator with "I am a *NURSE* I know about CPR.....". Highly doubt this was another case of jumped up UAP or some such with a case of job inflation. Even those persons know when to cut bait and telling an emergency operator one is a professional nurse during such a situation without holding a license would land whomever in very hot water.

    Also since the facility is backing the nurse's account of things we can assume she is just that and was following the place's ghastly standards of practice for this sort of situation.
    Orca, VivaLasViejas, and Altra like this.
  9. 4
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Posted a link to the 911 call above.

    The "nurse" on the telephone identified herself quite strongly as a *nurse* during the call even telling off the 911 operator with "I am a *NURSE* I know about CPR.....". Highly doubt this was another case of jumped up UAP or some such with a case of job inflation. Even those persons know when to cut bait and telling an emergency operator one is a professional nurse during such a situation without holding a license would land whomever in very hot water.

    Also since the facility is backing the nurse's account of things we can assume she is just that and was following the place's ghastly standards of practice for this sort of situation.
    Who wants to bet that this person, nurse or not, will very quickly be looking for new employment? The sacrificial lamb, so to speak.
    Orca, herring_RN, Nascar nurse, and 1 other like this.
  10. 5
    Quote from morte
    If their clinetele know this rulel, and still sign on the dotted line, it is what it is. And you need to be asystolic and not breathing for CPR, yes?

    No, a person can have severe bradycardia to perform CPR. Also the person could be in v-fib or v-tach to perform CPR.


Top