Nurse posts brain surgery pics on Facebook - page 5

by student456

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  1. 0
    Seriously folks, I have seen a lot of responses to this issue, from the asinine to the sublime. But I have yet to see one response that directly answers my question, what direct harm was done in what that nurse did?
  2. 1
    Quote from workingforskies
    Seriously folks, I have seen a lot of responses to this issue, from the asinine to the sublime. But I have yet to see one response that directly answers my question, what direct harm was done in what that nurse did?
    The direct harm that the nurse did by posting these pictures to Facebook is that she violated that patients trust in health care workers. That patient came to the hospital and expected that while they were being treated all hospital workers would respect the patient's privacy, which would include not taking pictures of the patient and posting them on Facebook. It doesn't matter that the pictures were non-identifying it still means that the nurse personally violated that patient's right to privacy. In my opinion, had the nurse simply just asked the patient to be able to use pictures from the surgery to share with colleagues or educational purposes then this wouldn't be an issue (even if posting them to Facebook is in bad taste.)

    !Chris
    UTHSCSA-Hopeful likes this.
  3. 0
    Wow, four pages. Look, she did something stupid, was caught, and punished. End of story.
  4. 0
    Oh dear- that is appalling!!! How unprofessional. Unfortunately, we actually had a similar situation here in Phoenix, AZ. A doctor took a picture of a patients genitals during gallbladder surgery. See the story posted below:

    http://www.efluxmedia.com/news_Resid...als_12116.html
    Mayo Clinic Hospital CEO Denis Cortese posted a statement on the hospital’s official web site according to which dr. Adam Hansen, the resident surgeon, was “no longer practicing medicine at Mayo Clinic.” Lynn Closway, spokesman for the hospital, would not disclose whether the surgeon resigned or had been fired.
    Dr. Adam Hansen had previously admitted that on Dec.11, 2007, he took a photo with his cell phone of one of his patient’s tattooed penis, which could read: “Hot Rod”, while he was undergoing a gallbladder intervention and showed the photo to several of his colleagues.
    The Arizona Republic related the episode on Monday, after an anonymous source leaked information on the incident, together with the name of the patient: Sean Dubowik, a strip club owner, who later found out he was the center of a scandal upon receiving a phone call on behalf of clinic representatives.
    Dubownik told reporters that he “got a strange call after [my] surgery from a doctor who said there was a problem. He said Hansen was on the phone and would explain.” After that, Hansen reportedly confessed his deed, admitting he took the picture while inserting a catheter into the patient’s penis.
    “Now I feel violated, betrayed and disgusted […] The longer I sit here the angrier I get,” Dubownik added.
    Referring to both Dr. Hansen and the employee who reported the incident, Lynn Closway, clinic spokesman, said they committed “serious violations, not only of our policies, but the sacred trust Mayo Clinic holds with its patients to respect their privacy and their dignity.”
    Mayo Clinic representatives have previously announced they were trying to find out who was responsible for the press release of the story, but that puts them in a questionable light, as many concern they committed ethical violations upon starting the investigation.
  5. 0
    Quote from workingforskies
    Seriously folks, I have seen a lot of responses to this issue, from the asinine to the sublime. But I have yet to see one response that directly answers my question, what direct harm was done in what that nurse did?
    These rules exist so that our patients will continue to trust us. I'm sorry that you cannot see that.
  6. 0
    While I agree that HIPPA is a little ridiculous (or a lot) - without even bothering to think about rationalizations my gut tells me this was inappropriate.
  7. 0
    I think the most important issue is ...If this nurse was clowning around taking cell phone pictures... who was doing her job? When a person is unconsious with their brain exposed, I'm sure they would like to think that the OR staff are being professional, doing their jobs, as opposed to taking photos to post on Facebook.

    Also, as someone else stated, why did everyone else let this happen? I find it hard to believe that she was the ONLY person in the room, so why didn't anyone report it or tell her it was wrong? Why didn't the Dr. kick her out of the OR for acting so immaturely?
  8. 0
    don't know what the laws are like in sweden but they are apparently similar to hippa or there wouldn't be a big stink about it
    i have never worked in or but i have heard of surgeons requiring a tape [audio or video?] to protect themselves against trivial lawsuits..they do require a signed consent i am sure but if you are faced with a necessary surgery and the md says they will not do the surgery w/o the signed consent you will grab the pen and sign
    i agree that hippa has been stretched out shape. we had a tech here who wanted to get a nurse in trouble because in a conversation she had heard something that she felt was inappropriate
  9. 0
    Quote from PoeticDyme
    ...(theoretically)...if she was that close..then she was scrubbed in..so wouldn't whipping out the phone & leaning over open brain matter with it have totally *broken* sterile field and jeopardized pt health in a much more tangible way than privacy hooplah...hmm..
    Great Point here!! Which makes me think.... Is anybody sure that these are authentic pictures?? And if they are...

    Quote from workingforskies
    ...there was, utterly, no harm done to anyone.
    Seriously.
  10. 0
    For me, it's not about HIPAA, it's about having respect for your patients.


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